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The acrylamide intake via some common baby food for children in Sweden during their first year of life--an improved method for analysis of acrylamide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29785
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
P. Fohgelberg
J. Rosén
K-E Hellenäs
L. Abramsson-Zetterberg
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Toxicology Division, Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Chromatography, Liquid
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Milk - chemistry
Milk, human - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Sweden
Abstract
The acrylamide levels in breast milk and the main categories of Swedish baby food products, i.e. breast milk substitute (infant formula), gruel, porridge and canned baby food, have been analysed. Furthermore, the acrylamide intake from these products by children up to one year of age has been estimated. Other kind of foods e.g. biscuits, are not included. Because of the expected low concentrations of acrylamide, a new sample extraction method for detection by liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry, was developed and validated. The lower limit of quantification was 0.5 microg kg(-1) for liquid samples and 2 microg kg(-1) for other samples. The average levels found for gruel, porridge and canned baby food, all ready to eat, were 1.4, 26, and 7.8 microg/kg respectively. We found great variations in the acrylamide levels between and in different food categories,
PubMed ID
15811575 View in PubMed
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Alternaria toxins alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in grain foods in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119610
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter M Scott
Wendy Zhao
Sherry Feng
Benjamin P-Y Lau
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Food Research Division, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 Canada. Peter_Scott@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alternaria - chemistry
Canada
Cereals - chemistry
Chromatography, Liquid
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Lactones - analysis
Limit of Detection
Methanol
Solid Phase Extraction
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Alternaria alternata has been reported to be the most common fungus on Canadian Western wheat. The Alternaria toxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) are mutagenic in vitro and there is also limited evidence for carcinogenic properties. They have been found in wheat from Europe, Argentina, China and Australia, but they have not been looked for in Canadian grains or grain foods. In the present study, 83 samples of grain-based food sold in Canada, including flour, bran, breakfast cereals, infant cereals and bread, were analysed for AOH and AME using extraction with methanol, clean-up on combined aminopropyl/C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and liquid chromatography (LC) with tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) determination. The overall average recoveries of AOH and AME from a variety of spiked cereal foods (n?=?13) were 45?±?9% and 53?±?9%, which could be attributed mainly to MS matrix effects The instrumental limits of detection (LOD) were 0.34 ng/g and 0.13 ng/g for AOH and AME, respectively, and the instrumental limits of quantitation (LOQ) were 1.1 and 0.43 ng/g. Of 83 samples analysed, 70 were positive for AOH (up to 63 ng/g, in a soft wheat bran) and 64 contained AME (up to 12 ng/g in a bran-based breakfast cereal). Of particular interest was the presence of AOH and/or AME in 27 out of 30 infant foods (up to 4.4 ng/g and 9.0 ng/g, respectively, in a sample of multigrain cereal).
Notes
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Sep 8;58(17):9622-3020687560
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Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2000 Jul;48(7):2920-410898645
Cites: Toxicol Pathol. 2001 Jul-Aug;29(4):492-711560255
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Apr;53(4):441-5118727009
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Cites: Toxicol Lett. 2006 Jul 14;164(3):221-3016464542
Cites: J Food Prot. 2008 Jun;71(6):1262-518592757
Cites: J AOAC Int. 2001 Nov-Dec;84(6):1809-1711767150
PubMed ID
23087499 View in PubMed
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Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Norwegian milk and infant formulas for ochratoxin A.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33228
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1999 Feb;16(2):75-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
M A Skaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Agriculture and Natural Science, Hedmark College, Ridabu, Norway.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1999 Feb;16(2):75-8
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carcinogens - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Food Contamination
Health Food - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Milk - chemistry
Mycotoxins - analysis
Norway
Ochratoxins - analysis
Abstract
Samples of organic cow's milk, conventional cow's milk, and cow's milk-based infant formulas were analysed for the occurrence of ochratoxin A by means of an HPLC method. The detection limit was 10 ng/l. Ochratoxin A was detected in 6 out of 40 conventional cow's milk samples (range 11-58 ng/l), and in 5 out of 47 organic milk samples (range 15-28 ng/l). No ochratoxin A was detected in any of the 20 infant formula samples. The ochratoxin A levels in cow's milk found in this investigation are sufficient to cause a higher intake of ochratoxin A than the suggested TDI of 5 ng/kg bw/day, e.g. in small children who consume large quantities of milk.
PubMed ID
10435076 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2003 May;69(5):286-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Steven M Levy
Author Affiliation
College of Dentistry, University of Iowa, Preventive and Community Dentistry, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA. steven-levy@uiowa.edu
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2003 May;69(5):286-91
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dentifrices - chemistry
Dietary Supplements
Esthetics, Dental
Fluoridation - adverse effects
Fluorides - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Fluorosis, Dental - epidemiology - etiology
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Iowa - epidemiology
Mouthwashes - chemistry
United States
Abstract
Decisions concerning use of fluoride in its many forms for caries prevention are more complicated now than in the past because of the need to balance these benefits with the risks of dental fluorosis. This article reviews pertinent literature concerning dental fluorosis (definition, appearance, prevalence), pre- and post-eruptive use of fluoride, esthetic perceptions of dental fluorosis, fluoride levels of beverages and foods, the Iowa Fluoride Study, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "Recommendations for Using Fluoride to Prevent and Control Dental Caries in the United States." Water fluoridation and use of fluoride dentifrice are the most efficient and cost-effective ways to prevent dental caries; other modalities should be targeted toward high-risk individuals.
PubMed ID
12734021 View in PubMed
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Bisphenol a in baby food products in glass jars with metal lids from Canadian markets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150825
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Jun 24;57(12):5345-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-2009
Author
Xu-Liang Cao
Jeannette Corriveau
Svetlana Popovic
Genevieve Clement
Franca Beraldin
Guy Dufresne
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. xu-liang_cao@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Jun 24;57(12):5345-51
Date
Jun-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzhydryl Compounds
Canada
Food contamination - analysis
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry - methods
Humans
Infant Food - analysis
Phenols - analysis
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
A method based on solid phase extraction and derivatization with acetic anhydride followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was validated for the determination of bisphenol A (BPA) in baby foods. The average method detection limit (MDL) was 0.18 ng/g for a 5 g sample. Method repeatability was demonstrated with the replicate analyses of various different types of baby foods; relative standard deviations (RSD) ranged from 1.2 to 16.1% with an average of 8.7%. Extraction recoveries ranged from 93.5 to 102.5% for different types of baby foods spiked at levels of 1-8 ng/g. This method was used to analyze 122 baby food products of 7 brands in glass jars with metal lids for BPA. The presence of BPA could not be confirmed and quantified for 23 of the 122 products due to interference from sample matrices. For the other 99 products, 15% had BPA levels of less than the average MDL, about 70% had BPA levels of less than 1 ng/g, and the average BPA levels in all 99 products was 1.1 ng/g. The average BPA level in the baby food products from brand E (3.9 ng/g) is higher than the average BPA levels in the products from the other brands (0.54-1.1 ng/g). The highest level of BPA, 7.2 ng/g, was found in two products from brand E as well. The average BPA level in the fruit products from all brands (0.60 ng/g) is lower than those in the mixed-dish products (1.1 ng/g) and the vegetable products (1.2 ng/g).
PubMed ID
19459630 View in PubMed
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Computed and chemically determined nutrient content of foods in Greece. The Foods and Nutrients Working Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210738
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 1996 Nov;47(6):507-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
C. Boulous
A. Kanellou
A. Trichopoulou
Author Affiliation
National Nutrition Centre, Athens School of Public Health, Greece.
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 1996 Nov;47(6):507-11
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cheese - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Energy intake
Fabaceae - chemistry
Food Analysis - methods
Food Contamination
Greece
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Meat - analysis
Nutrition Assessment
Pesticides - analysis
Plants, Medicinal
Sheep
Abstract
Energy-generating nutrients and total energy were computed and analytically determined for four widely used foods in Greece (mousaka, bean soup, infant food, and feta cheese), as well as for the individual food items necessary for their preparation. Standard procedures were used for chemical analyses, whereas computed values were generated through the Unilever Dietary Analysis Program--UNIDAP (Barrow et al., 1988) on the basis of the British food composition tables. Pesticides and pesticide residues were also determined in the studied samples. A very good agreement was noted with respect to the nutrient composition of the four prepared foods, whereas the agreement was somewhat weaker for the individual food items used for the preparation of the composite foods. It is concluded that the UNIDAP program generates reliable nutrient composition data for composite foods and for time integrated dietary intakes in Greece. The concentrations of several of the determined pesticides were towards the higher end of the spectrum of levels reported in the literature. This project has demonstrated the value of collaboration between academic institutions, industry, and state laboratories towards the development and validation of food composition databases.
PubMed ID
8933205 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of bisphenol A in the composite food samples from the 2008 Canadian total diet study in Quebec City and dietary intake estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134088
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):791-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
X-L Cao
C. Perez-Locas
G. Dufresne
G. Clement
S. Popovic
F. Beraldin
R W Dabeka
M. Feeley
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Canada, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Xu-Liang.Cao@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):791-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Canada
Child
Cooking
Databases, Factual
Diet
Diet Surveys
Endocrine Disruptors - administration & dosage - analysis - isolation & purification
Fast Foods - analysis - standards
Female
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Food, Preserved - analysis - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis - standards
Legislation, Food
Male
Phenols - administration & dosage - analysis - isolation & purification
Quebec
Abstract
A total of 154 food composite samples from the 2008 total diet study in Quebec City were analysed for bisphenol A (BPA), and BPA was detected in less than half (36%, or 55 samples) of the samples tested. High concentrations of BPA were found mostly in the composite samples containing canned foods, with the highest BPA level being observed in canned fish (106 ng g(-1)), followed by canned corn (83.7 ng g(-1)), canned soups (22.2-44.4 ng g(-1)), canned baked beans (23.5 ng g(-1)), canned peas (16.8 ng g(-1)), canned evaporated milk (15.3 ng g(-1)), and canned luncheon meats (10.5 ng g(-1)). BPA levels in baby food composite samples were low, with 2.75 ng g(-1) in canned liquid infant formula, and 0.84-2.46 ng g(-1) in jarred baby foods. BPA was also detected in some foods that are not canned or in jars, such as yeast (8.52 ng g(-1)), baking powder (0.64 ng g(-1)), some cheeses (0.68-2.24 ng g(-1)), breads and some cereals (0.40-1.73 ng g(-1)), and fast foods (1.1-10.9 ng g(-1)). Dietary intakes of BPA were low for all age-sex groups, with 0.17-0.33 µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for infants, 0.082-0.23 µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for children aged from 1 to 19 years, and 0.052-0.081 µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for adults, well below the established regulatory limits. BPA intakes from 19 of the 55 samples account for more than 95% of the total dietary intakes, and most of the 19 samples were either canned or in jars. Intakes of BPA from non-canned foods are low.
Notes
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2001 Jan;18(1):69-7511212549
Cites: J Nutr. 2001 Feb;131(2):409S-20S11160571
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2002 Aug;19(8):796-80212227943
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2003 Jun;20(6):596-60612881134
Cites: J AOAC Int. 1993 Jan-Feb;76(1):14-258448438
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2005 Jan;22(1):65-7215895613
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(21-22):1327-3520077204
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Mar 26;56(6):2041-718284199
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Sep 10;56(17):7919-2418702469
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2009 Feb;47(2):506-1019121362
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Feb 25;57(4):1307-1119170636
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Jun 24;57(12):5345-5119459630
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2007 Jan;24(1):103-1217164221
PubMed ID
21623504 View in PubMed
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Dental fluorosis in the primary and the permanent dentition in fluoridated areas with consumption of either powdered milk or natural cow's milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38503
Source
J Dent Res. 1988 May;67(5):822-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
M J Larsen
F. Senderovitz
E. Kirkegaard
S. Poulsen
O. Fejerskov
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Anatomy, Dental Pathology and Operative Dentistry, Royal Dental College, Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
J Dent Res. 1988 May;67(5):822-5
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark
Fluorides - administration & dosage - analysis
Fluorosis, Dental - epidemiology
Food Habits
Greenland
Humans
Infant Food - analysis
Milk - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tooth Calcification
Tooth, Deciduous
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to describe the patterns of dental fluorosis in the primary and the permanent dentition of children born and reared in two different fluoridated areas, one in which powdered milk suspended in tap water was commonly used (Narssaq, Greenland: 1.1 ppm fluoride in the water) and one in which cow's milk was provided (Vordingborg, Denmark: 1.4-1.6 ppm fluoride in the water). Dental fluorosis was recorded by Thylstrup and Fejerskov's classification. In both locations, the prevalence of dental fluorosis increased the later in life the tooth type was formed. The prevalence of dental fluorosis in the earliest formed teeth was higher in the area where powdered milk was suspended in fluoride-containing tap water than where pasteurized cow's milk was used. In the first permanent molars, the maxillary incisors, and the canines, the prevalence was rather similar in the two areas. In the latest formed teeth, the premolars, the level of fluorosis was higher in Vordingborg. The pattern of dental fluorosis suggests that when powdered milk was used frequently, the children were exposed to a higher fluoride intake earlier in life than were those consuming cow's milk during infancy and childhood.
PubMed ID
3163350 View in PubMed
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[Detection of bacteria of the genus Erwinia in sanitary- microbiological control of dry milk products for infants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226416
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1991 May-Jun;(3):42-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
N R Karlikanova
S A Sheveleva
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1991 May-Jun;(3):42-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Erwinia - classification - growth & development - isolation & purification
Food Inspection - methods
Food Microbiology - standards
Freeze Drying
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis - standards
Milk - microbiology
Moscow
Abstract
The possibility of identification of Erwinia bacteria was established during the microbiological analysis of child nutrition products, containing vegetable components, for the presence of coliform bacteria. Biochemical and cultural-physiological properties differentiating Erwinia herbicola from Enterobacter agglomerans were studied, and the most significant differential-diagnostic tests for bacteria identification were determined. To identify Erwinia bacteria that do not belong to coliform bacteria the following additional tests are recommended for practical use at the sanitary-bacteriological laboratories: the presence of yellow or brown pigment during the growth in Endo medium; inoculation into nutrient agar medium with saccharose; inoculation into gelatin -containing medium.
PubMed ID
1926816 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.