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23 records – page 1 of 3.

[A medical controversy: increasing occurrence of celiac disease--for good or bad? Infant food should not cause disease. Early discovery prevents complications]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59719
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 12;88(24):2248-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1991

Are weaning foods causing impaired iron and zinc status in 1-year-old Swedish infants? A cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58965
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1998 Jun;87(6):618-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
L A Persson
M. Lundström
B. Lönnerdal
O. Hernell
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1998 Jun;87(6):618-22
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Analysis of Variance
Blood Chemical Analysis
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Deficiency Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Ferritin - blood - deficiency
Food, Fortified
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Infant, Newborn
Iron - blood - deficiency
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Weaning
Zinc - blood - deficiency
Abstract
We analysed whether 12-month-old Swedish infants who have been fed iron-fortified and relatively zinc-rich foods, according to current recommendations, have adequate iron and zinc status. A cohort of 76 healthy, full term Swedish infants was followed regarding feeding habits and growth from birth to 12 months of age, when haemoglobin, iron and zinc status were evaluated. Twenty-six percent of the infants had low (
PubMed ID
9686651 View in PubMed
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Atopy prevention in childhood: the role of diet. Prospective 5-year follow-up of high-risk infants with six months exclusive breastfeeding and solid food elimination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219534
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 1994;5(6 Suppl):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Source
Lancet. 1994 Jul 30;344(8918):341-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-1994
Author
L. Stenhammar
Source
Lancet. 1994 Jul 30;344(8918):341-2
Date
Jul-30-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Celiac Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 1994 May 28;343(8909):13727910367
PubMed ID
7914290 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lancet. 1994 Jul 30;344(8918):340-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-1994
Author
H. Ascher
B. Kristiansson
Source
Lancet. 1994 Jul 30;344(8918):340-1
Date
Jul-30-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Celiac Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 1994 May 28;343(8909):13727910367
PubMed ID
7914289 View in PubMed
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[Complication with feeding of infant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60557
Source
Vardfacket. 1980 Nov 13;4(20):50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-13-1980

Cow's milk allergy, incidence and pathogenetic role of early exposure to cow's milk formula.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16253
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1979 May;68(3):383-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979
Author
G. Stintzing
R. Zetterström
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1979 May;68(3):383-7
Date
May-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Asthma - etiology
Breast Feeding
Cattle
Diarrhea, Infantile - etiology
Eczema - etiology
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Infant Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Milk - adverse effects
Rhinitis - etiology
Sweden
Urticaria - etiology
Vomiting - etiology
Abstract
A study was performed in infants under the age of 12 months born during 1974 and admitted to St. Göran's Children's Hospital with symptoms suggestive of cow's milk allergy (CMA). The aims of the study were to determine the role of early exposure to cow's milk formulas as a predisposing factor to CMA and to estimate the incidence of CMA in infancy. Twenty-five infants fulfilled the criteria for CMA. Available records were reviewed and a careful history was obtained from the mothers on two occasions. The patient group was compared with a control group. Sixteen of the 25 infants were exposed to cow's milk protein during their first week in the nursery for newborns, 6 were exposed before the end of the fourth week of life, and 3 infants were apparently not exposed. All infants were breast fed 3 to 26 weeks before re-exposure and occurrence of symptoms. Infants with CMA were given cow's milk formulas during their first 4 weeks of life significantly more often than infants in the control group (p less than 0.01). The incidence of CMA was approximately 1 : 200. The first 4 weeks after birth seem to be a particularly vulnerable period. Hence, in order to prevent CMA, infant formula should not be given--even occasionally--during this period.
PubMed ID
571665 View in PubMed
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Cow's milk formula feeding induces primary immunization to insulin in infants at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201661
Source
Diabetes. 1999 Jul;48(7):1389-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
O. Vaarala
M. Knip
J. Paronen
A M Hämäläinen
P. Muona
M. Väätäinen
J. Ilonen
O. Simell
H K Akerblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. outi.vaarala@ktl.fi
Source
Diabetes. 1999 Jul;48(7):1389-94
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigen-Antibody Reactions
Autoantibodies - immunology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics - immunology - physiopathology
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Immunization
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - immunology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Insulin autoantibodies (IAAs) often appear as the first sign of islet cell autoimmunity in prediabetic children. Because cow's milk contains bovine insulin, we followed the development of insulin-binding antibodies in children fed with cow's milk formula. Bovine insulin- and human insulin-binding antibodies by enzyme immunoassay and IAA by radioimmunoassay were analyzed in 200 infants carrying HLA-DQB1*0302 but no protective alleles who participated in a Finnish population-based birth-cohort study. Based on the prospectively registered information, the first 100 infants enrolled in the study who were exposed to cow's milk formula before age 12 weeks and the first 100 infants enrolled in the study who were exclusively breast-fed for longer than their first 12 weeks of life were selected for the present study. Also, 11 children from the birth cohort who developed at least two diabetes-associated autoantibodies, 98 children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, and 92 healthy children were studied. We found that the amount of IgG-antibodies binding to bovine insulin was higher at age 3 months in infants who were exposed to cow's milk formula than in infants who were exclusively breast-fed at that age (median 0.521 vs. 0.190; P
PubMed ID
10389843 View in PubMed
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Criteria for labelling infant formulas as "hypoallergenic". Allergy Section, Canadian Pediatric Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218591
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):883-4, 887-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1994
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):883-4, 887-8
Date
Mar-15-1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology
Food Inspection - standards
Food Labeling - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Pediatrics
Societies, Medical
Notes
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1971 Jan;29(1):1-75170581
Cites: Allergy Proc. 1991 Jul-Aug;12(4):239-441936972
Cites: Clin Exp Immunol. 1978 May;32(2):263-71668201
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand. 1978 Jul;67(4):497-504676736
Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 Oct;93(4):561-4568172
Cites: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1982;1(1):23-86892249
Cites: Anal Biochem. 1983 Sep;133(2):288-916638494
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1985 Aug;60(8):727-354037856
Cites: Clin Allergy. 1985 Nov;15(6):517-224075514
Cites: Pediatrics. 1987 May;79(5):683-83575022
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1989 Apr;62(4):333-52705659
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1989 Jul;84(1):72-892754147
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1989 Aug;84(2):2722760363
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1989 Aug;63(2):102-62669565
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1990 Jan;85(1 Pt 1):108-152299096
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Jan;118(1):71-41986102
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Jan;118(1):74-71986103
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Apr;118(4 Pt 1):520-52007924
Cites: Allergy. 1978 Feb;33(1):3-1477135
PubMed ID
8131121 View in PubMed
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Early nutrition and later diabetes risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173065
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2005;569:142-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Mikael Knip
Hans K Akerblom
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 281, FI-00029 HUCH, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2005;569:142-50
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Milk Proteins - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Milk, Human - immunology
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Early feeding may modify the risk of both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life. The information generated so far is, however, controversial. When evaluating studies on the impact of early feeding on risk of later diabetes, the data have to be assessed critically and possible confounding factors have to be considered. The study design may induce biases and there are considerable differences in early feeding practices across various countries and cultures. Accordingly it may not be possible to generalise observations based on one population. Long breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding in particular, and supplementation with vitamin D in infancy have been reported to confer partial protection against beta-cell autoimmunity and TID. In contrast, early exposure to cow's milk proteins and cereals and heavy weight in infancy have been implicated as risk factors for T1D. Long breastfeeding has also been observed to protect against T2D in aboriginal populations. Poor fetal nutrition resulting in low birth weight has been identified as a factor contributing to later insulin resistance and T2D. Recent data indicate that current overweight and obesity are stronger determinants of insulin resistance than birth weight among preschool children. High-nutrient diet and rapid growth in early infancy have been reported to adversely programme the principal components of the metabolic syndrome including insulin resistance and T2D. It is an important scientific and public-health objective to define protective and predisposing effects of early nutrition on the development of diabetes, since early feeding can potentially be modified to minimise the risk of later chronic diseases.
PubMed ID
16137119 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.