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The acrylamide intake via some common baby food for children in Sweden during their first year of life--an improved method for analysis of acrylamide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29785
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
P. Fohgelberg
J. Rosén
K-E Hellenäs
L. Abramsson-Zetterberg
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Toxicology Division, Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Chromatography, Liquid
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Milk - chemistry
Milk, human - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Sweden
Abstract
The acrylamide levels in breast milk and the main categories of Swedish baby food products, i.e. breast milk substitute (infant formula), gruel, porridge and canned baby food, have been analysed. Furthermore, the acrylamide intake from these products by children up to one year of age has been estimated. Other kind of foods e.g. biscuits, are not included. Because of the expected low concentrations of acrylamide, a new sample extraction method for detection by liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry, was developed and validated. The lower limit of quantification was 0.5 microg kg(-1) for liquid samples and 2 microg kg(-1) for other samples. The average levels found for gruel, porridge and canned baby food, all ready to eat, were 1.4, 26, and 7.8 microg/kg respectively. We found great variations in the acrylamide levels between and in different food categories,
PubMed ID
15811575 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Aug;96(7):10-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
W. Wong
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Aug;96(7):10-1
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic
Breast Feeding
Canada
Female
Health Promotion - standards
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Organizational Policy
World Health Organization
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Oct;96(9):811865510
PubMed ID
11865518 View in PubMed
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Age at the introduction of solid foods during the first year and allergic sensitization at age 5 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146877
Source
Pediatrics. 2010 Jan;125(1):50-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Bright I Nwaru
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Suvi Ahonen
Minna Kaila
Anna-Maija Haapala
Carina Kronberg-Kippilä
Raili Salmelin
Riitta Veijola
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland. bright.nwaru@uta.fi
Source
Pediatrics. 2010 Jan;125(1):50-9
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Feeding
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Hypersensitivity - immunology - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - immunology
Infant
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Odds Ratio
Probability
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Abstract
The goal was to examine the relationship between age at the introduction of solid foods during the first year of life and allergic sensitization in 5-year-old children.
We analyzed data from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention nutrition study, a prospective, birth cohort study. We studied 994 children with HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes mellitus for whom information on breastfeeding, age at the introduction of solid foods, and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E levels at 5 years was available. The association between age at the introduction of solid foods and allergic sensitization was analyzed by using logistic regression.
The median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was 1.8 months (range: 0-10 months). After adjustment for potential confounders, late introduction of potatoes (>4 months), oats (>5 months), rye (>7 months), wheat (>6 months), meat (>5.5 months), fish (>8.2 months), and eggs (>10.5 months) was significantly directly associated with sensitization to food allergens. Late introduction of potatoes, rye, meat, and fish was significantly associated with sensitization to any inhalant allergen. In models that included all solid foods that were significantly related to the end points, eggs, oats, and wheat remained the most important foods related to sensitization to food allergens, whereas potatoes and fish were the most important foods associated with inhalant allergic sensitization. We found no evidence of reverse causality, taking into account parental allergic rhinitis and asthma.
Late introduction of solid foods was associated with increased risk of allergic sensitization to food and inhalant allergens.
PubMed ID
19969611 View in PubMed
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Allergic symptoms up to 4-6 years of age in children given cow milk neonatally. A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36696
Source
Allergy. 1992 Jun;47(3):207-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
A T Lindfors
L. Danielsson
E. Enocksson
S G Johansson
S. Westin
Author Affiliation
Dept of Pediatrics, Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1992 Jun;47(3):207-11
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Incidence
Infant
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Milk - immunology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a previously published prospective study, we followed the development of allergic symptoms in term infants with a slightly reduced birthweight (-1 SD to -2 SD). These children received, according to local routine, early feeding with cow milk formula in order to diminish such neonatal problems as hypoglycemia and hyperbilirubinemia. Of 216 infants 207 were observed for allergic symptoms up to 18 months of age. One group (F) received cow milk formula during the first days of life before the mother's breastmilk production started and was then breastfed; the other (B) was not given any formula before normal breastfeeding started. Unexpectedly, we found fewer allergic symptoms, in particular allergic skin problems, in the group fed cow milk, the difference being concentrated to children with a family history of allergic symptoms. At 5 years of age 183 of the 207 children have been reinvestigated. Mild symptoms of allergy (suspected and obvious) were found in 22% (F) and 27% (B) respectively (NS). Moderate and severe symptoms of allergy (obvious) were found in 4.2% (F) and 4.5% (B). In the subgroup with a double family history of allergic symptoms, 28% (7/25, F) and 59% (10/17, B) had symptoms of allergy (p less than 0.05). This difference was even more pronounced when laboratory tests in favour of atopic diagnosis were included, 14% (F) and 53% (B) respectively (p less than 0.05). Thus at 5 years we still find a significantly lower frequency of allergic symptoms in the subgroup fed cow milk formula early with a family history of allergic symptoms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1510232 View in PubMed
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Alternaria toxins alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in grain foods in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119610
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter M Scott
Wendy Zhao
Sherry Feng
Benjamin P-Y Lau
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Food Research Division, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 Canada. Peter_Scott@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alternaria - chemistry
Canada
Cereals - chemistry
Chromatography, Liquid
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Lactones - analysis
Limit of Detection
Methanol
Solid Phase Extraction
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Alternaria alternata has been reported to be the most common fungus on Canadian Western wheat. The Alternaria toxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) are mutagenic in vitro and there is also limited evidence for carcinogenic properties. They have been found in wheat from Europe, Argentina, China and Australia, but they have not been looked for in Canadian grains or grain foods. In the present study, 83 samples of grain-based food sold in Canada, including flour, bran, breakfast cereals, infant cereals and bread, were analysed for AOH and AME using extraction with methanol, clean-up on combined aminopropyl/C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and liquid chromatography (LC) with tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) determination. The overall average recoveries of AOH and AME from a variety of spiked cereal foods (n?=?13) were 45?±?9% and 53?±?9%, which could be attributed mainly to MS matrix effects The instrumental limits of detection (LOD) were 0.34 ng/g and 0.13 ng/g for AOH and AME, respectively, and the instrumental limits of quantitation (LOQ) were 1.1 and 0.43 ng/g. Of 83 samples analysed, 70 were positive for AOH (up to 63 ng/g, in a soft wheat bran) and 64 contained AME (up to 12 ng/g in a bran-based breakfast cereal). Of particular interest was the presence of AOH and/or AME in 27 out of 30 infant foods (up to 4.4 ng/g and 9.0 ng/g, respectively, in a sample of multigrain cereal).
Notes
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Sep 8;58(17):9622-3020687560
Cites: Prikl Biokhim Mikrobiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;47(1):79-8321442923
Cites: Fungal Biol. 2012 Feb;116(2):249-6022289771
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2000 Jul;48(7):2920-410898645
Cites: Toxicol Pathol. 2001 Jul-Aug;29(4):492-711560255
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Apr;53(4):441-5118727009
Cites: Chin Med J (Engl). 1992 May;105(5):394-4001499370
Cites: Biochem J. 1953 Oct;55(3):421-3313105649
Cites: Toxicol Lett. 2006 Jul 14;164(3):221-3016464542
Cites: J Food Prot. 2008 Jun;71(6):1262-518592757
Cites: J AOAC Int. 2001 Nov-Dec;84(6):1809-1711767150
PubMed ID
23087499 View in PubMed
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Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
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[A medical controversy: increasing occurrence of celiac disease--for good or bad? Infant food should not cause disease. Early discovery prevents complications]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59719
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 12;88(24):2248-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1991

American Academy of Pediatrics. Nutrition Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society and the Committee on Nutrition of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Breast-feeding. A commentary in celebration of the International Year of the Child, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248226
Source
Pediatrics. 1978 Oct;62(4):591-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1978
Source
Pediatrics. 1978 Oct;62(4):591-601
Date
Oct-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Canada
Cholesterol - metabolism
Dietary Proteins - metabolism
Humans
Infant Food
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Iron - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism
Milk, Human - immunology - metabolism - physiology
Obesity - etiology
Pediatrics
Societies, Medical
United States
Abstract
1. Full-term newborn infants should be breastfed, except if there are specific contraindications or when breast-feeding is unsuccessful. 2. Education about breast-feeding should be provided in schools for all children, and better education about breast-feeding and infant nutrition should be provided in the curriculum of physicians and nurses. Information about breast-feeding should also be presented in public communications media. 3. Prenatal instruction should include both theoretical and practical information about breast-feeding. 4. Attitudes and practices in prenatal clinics and in maternity wards should encourage a climate which favors breast-feeding. The staff should include nurses and other personnel who are not only favorably disposed toward breast-feeding but also knowledgeable and skilled in the art. 5. Consultation between maternity services and agencies committed to breast-feeding should be strengthened. 6. Studies should be conducted on the feasibility of breast-feeding infants at day nurseries adjacent to places of work subsequent to an appropriate leave of absence following the birth of an infant.
PubMed ID
362368 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Norwegian milk and infant formulas for ochratoxin A.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33228
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1999 Feb;16(2):75-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
M A Skaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Agriculture and Natural Science, Hedmark College, Ridabu, Norway.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1999 Feb;16(2):75-8
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carcinogens - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Food Contamination
Health Food - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Milk - chemistry
Mycotoxins - analysis
Norway
Ochratoxins - analysis
Abstract
Samples of organic cow's milk, conventional cow's milk, and cow's milk-based infant formulas were analysed for the occurrence of ochratoxin A by means of an HPLC method. The detection limit was 10 ng/l. Ochratoxin A was detected in 6 out of 40 conventional cow's milk samples (range 11-58 ng/l), and in 5 out of 47 organic milk samples (range 15-28 ng/l). No ochratoxin A was detected in any of the 20 infant formula samples. The ochratoxin A levels in cow's milk found in this investigation are sufficient to cause a higher intake of ochratoxin A than the suggested TDI of 5 ng/kg bw/day, e.g. in small children who consume large quantities of milk.
PubMed ID
10435076 View in PubMed
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An anthroposophic lifestyle and intestinal microflora in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31230
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Dec;13(6):402-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Johan S Alm
Jackie Swartz
Bengt Björkstén
Lars Engstrand
Johan Engström
Inger Kühn
Gunnar Lilja
Roland Möllby
Elisabeth Norin
Göran Pershagen
Claudia Reinders
Karin Wreiber
Annika Scheynius
Author Affiliation
Sachs' Children's Clinic, Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Johan.Alm@sos.ki.se
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Dec;13(6):402-11
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anthroposophy - psychology
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Colony Count, Microbial
Comparative Study
Family Health
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - diagnosis - microbiology - therapy
Infant
Infant Food - microbiology
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Intestines - microbiology
Life Style
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The intestinal flora is considered to have an impact on the development of the immune system. In the anthroposophic lifestyle, a diet comprising vegetables spontaneously fermented by lactobacilli, and a restrictive use of antibiotics, anti-pyretics and vaccinations, is typical. The aim of this study was to assess the gut flora in infants in relation to certain lifestyle characteristics associated with anthroposophy. Sixty-nine children
PubMed ID
12485315 View in PubMed
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273 records – page 1 of 28.