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Acupuncture reduces crying in infants with infantile colic: a randomised, controlled, blind clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139981
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kajsa Landgren
Nina Kvorning
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Kajsa.Landgren@med.lu.se
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Points
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Colic - therapy
Crying
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant Care - methods
Infant, Newborn
Male
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To investigate whether acupuncture reduces the duration and intensity of crying in infants with colic. Patients and methods 90 otherwise healthy infants, 2-8 weeks old, with infantile colic were randomised in this controlled blind study. 81 completed a structured programme consisting of six visits during 3 weeks to an acupuncture clinic in Sweden. Parents blinded to the allocation of their children met a blinded nurse. The infant was subsequently given to another nurse in a separate room, who handled all infants similarly except that infants allocated to receive acupuncture were given minimal, standardised acupuncture for 2 s in LI4.
There was a difference (p=0.034) favouring the acupuncture group in the time which passed from inclusion until the infant no longer met the criteria for colic. The duration of fussing was lower in the acupuncture group the first (74 vs 129 min; p=0.029) and second week (71 vs 102 min; p=0.047) as well as the duration of colicky crying in the second intervention week (9 vs 13 min; p=0.046) was lower in the acupuncture group. The total duration of fussing, crying and colicky crying (TC) was lower in the acupuncture group during the first (193 vs 225 min; p=0.025) and the second intervention week (164 vs 188 min; p=0.016). The relative difference from baseline throughout the intervention weeks showed differences between groups for fussing in the first week (22 vs 6 min; p=0.028), for colicky crying in the second week (92 vs 73 min; p=0.041) and for TC in the second week (44 vs 29 min; p=0.024), demonstrating favour towards the acupuncture group.
Minimal acupuncture shortened the duration and reduced the intensity of crying in infants with colic. Further research using different acupuncture points, needle techniques and intervals between treatments is required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20959312 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of pain sensitivity in neonates with surgical pathology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101737
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2011 Jan-Feb;(1):50-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
N I Mel'nikova
E Iu Dzemeshko
I A Strogonov
V V Vorob'ev
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2011 Jan-Feb;(1):50-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, General
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - psychology - surgery
Pain Measurement - methods
Pain Threshold - physiology
Respiration, Artificial
Surgical Procedures, Operative - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Definition of pain in newborns with surgical pathology in the traditional way (change the child's behavior, skin color, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, body temperature, blood gas parameters) is subjective. The "Med-Storm" pain stress detector, manufactured by "Med-Storm Innovation AS" (Norway) allows the quantification of pain during and after surgery in infants. For a small sample, specificity was 76%, sensitivity--89%. Important indicator was the peak skin conductance. The change in the area under the curve was less often, but indicated the need of analgesia dose change.
PubMed ID
21513070 View in PubMed
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Association between sudden infant death syndrome and prone sleep position, bed sharing, and sleeping outside an infant crib in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4513
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):923-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
B D Gessner
G C Ives
K A Perham-Hester
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. brad_gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):923-7
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Beds - utilization
Cause of Death
Child of Impaired Parents - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant Care - methods
Infant Equipment - utilization
Infant mortality
Maternal Age
Parents - psychology
Prone Position - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sleep - physiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sudden Infant Death - epidemiology
Supine Position - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the contribution of prone sleeping, bed sharing, and sleeping outside an infant crib to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of all SIDS cases in Alaska from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 1997. Reviewed data sources included maternal and infant medical records, autopsy reports, birth and death certificates, police and state trooper death scene investigations, and occasionally home interviews. RESULTS: The death certificate identified SIDS as a cause of death for 130 infants (cause-specific infant mortality rate: 2.0 per 1000 live births). Among infants for whom this information was known, 113 (98%) of 115 were found in the prone position, sleeping outside an infant crib, or sleeping with another person. By contrast, 2 (1.7%) were found alone and supine in their crib (1 of whom was found with a blanket wrapped around his face). Of 40 infants who slept with a parent at the time of death, only 1 infant who slept supine with a non-drug-using parent on an adult nonwater mattress was identified. CONCLUSION: Almost all SIDS deaths in Alaska occurred in association with prone sleeping, bed sharing, or sleeping outside a crib. In the absence of other risk factors, SIDS deaths associated with parental bed sharing were rare.
PubMed ID
11581445 View in PubMed
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Caregiving and early infant crying in a danish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58281
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2004 Apr;25(2):91-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Marissa Alvarez
Author Affiliation
University of Copenhagen, Department of Psychology, Copenhagen, Denmark. Marissa.Alvarez@psy.ku.dk
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2004 Apr;25(2):91-8
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - psychology
Crying - physiology - psychology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Maternal caregiving and fussing/crying in Danish infants at 3, 6, and 12 weeks were examined using self-report scales and 24-hour behavior diaries. Mothers reported practices commonly associated with responsive caregiving: frequent feeding, prompt response to infant cries, and considerable time holding the infant. Fuss/cry durations peaked in the first 2 months, were highest in evenings, and decreased approximately 50% by 12 weeks. Fussing was the majority behavior, and 9.2% of the infants fussed and cried more than 3 hours per day. In contrast with other Western studies, 24-hour fuss/cry durations were lower, and fussing accounted for up to 80% of total distress. Danish caregiving practices may partially explain the lower durations of infant distress and the lower ratio of cry to fuss. However, some infants fuss/cry a great deal despite sensitive care, which may reflect individual differences in infant maturation of behavior regulation.
PubMed ID
15083130 View in PubMed
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Computerized motion analysis of videotaped neonatal seizures of epileptic origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58160
Source
Epilepsia. 2005 Jun;46(6):901-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Nicolaos B Karayiannis
Guozhi Tao
Yaohua Xiong
Abdul Sami
Bindu Varughese
James D Frost
Merrill S Wise
Eli M Mizrahi
Author Affiliation
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005, USA. Karayiannis@UH.EDU
Source
Epilepsia. 2005 Jun;46(6):901-17
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - physiopathology
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation - methods
Dyskinesias - diagnosis - physiopathology
Electroencephalography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Epilepsy - diagnosis - physiopathology
Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - organization & administration
Motor Activity - physiology
Movement - physiology
Neural Networks (Computer)
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Seizures - classification - diagnosis - physiopathology
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Videotape Recording - methods
Abstract
PURPOSE: The main objective of this research is the development of automated video processing and analysis procedures aimed at the recognition and characterization of the types of neonatal seizures. The long-term goal of this research is the integration of these computational procedures into the development of a stand-alone automated system that could be used as a supplement in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to provide 24-h per day noninvasive monitoring of infants at risk for seizures. METHODS: We developed and evaluated a variety of computational tools and procedures that may be used to carry out the three essential tasks involved in the development of a seizure recognition and characterization system: the extraction of quantitative motion information from video recordings of neonatal seizures in the form of motion-strength and motor-activity signals, the selection of quantitative features that convey some unique behavioral characteristics of neonatal seizures, and the training of artificial neural networks to distinguish neonatal seizures from random infant behaviors and to differentiate between myoclonic and focal clonic seizures. RESULTS: The methods were tested on a set of 240 video recordings of 43 patients exhibiting myoclonic seizures (80 cases), focal clonic seizures (80 cases), and random infant movements (80 cases). The outcome of the experiments verified that optical- flow methods are promising computational tools for quantifying neonatal seizures from video recordings in the form of motion-strength signals. The experimental results also verified that the robust motion trackers developed in this study outperformed considerably the motion trackers based on predictive block matching in terms of both reliability and accuracy. The quantitative features selected from motion-strength and motor-activity signals constitute a satisfactory representation of neonatal seizures and random infant movements and seem to be complementary. Such features lead to trained neural networks that exhibit performance levels exceeding the initial goals of this study, the sensitivity goal being >or=80% and the specificity goal being >or=90%. CONCLUSIONS: The outcome of this experimental study provides strong evidence that it is feasible to develop an automated system for the recognition and characterization of the types of neonatal seizures based on video recordings. This will be accomplished by enhancing the accuracy and improving the reliability of the computational tools and methods developed during the course of the study outlined here.
PubMed ID
15946330 View in PubMed
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Early physical contact between a mother and her NICU-infant in two university hospitals in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262006
Source
Midwifery. 2013 Dec;29(12):1321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Hannakaisa Niela-Vilén
Anna Axelin
Sanna Salanterä
Liisa Lehtonen
Outi Tammela
Raili Salmelin
Reija Latva
Source
Midwifery. 2013 Dec;29(12):1321-30
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - methods - psychology
Data Collection
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - psychology - therapy
Infant, Premature - physiology - psychology
Intensive Care, Neonatal - methods - psychology
Maternal Behavior - physiology - psychology
Mother-Child Relations
Quality Improvement
Questionnaires
Abstract
the first aim of this two-phase study was to describe and compare, between two university hospitals, the early physical contact of mothers and their preterm or sick newborn infants in the delivery room. Secondly, the staff's perceptions of factors facilitating and promoting or impeding this contact were evaluated. Thirdly, the association between early physical contact and the initiation of breast feeding was examined.
a structured survey was conducted between November 2008 and March 2009 in two university hospitals in Finland.
in phase I, the sample consisted of all preterm or sick infants who needed NICU care and whose questionnaires were completed by labour ward staff (hospital A, n=178/185, hospital B, n=203/235). In phase II, a subsample of these infants (A, n=76, B, n=94) and their mothers who completed their questionnaires participated in the study.
structured questionnaires developed for this study were used.
the implementation of early physical contact differed between the study hospitals. The infants had physical contact with their mothers more often in hospital A than in hospital B whether they were sick full-term (83% versus 58%, p
PubMed ID
23434024 View in PubMed
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How are social-emotional and behavioral competences and problems at age 1 year associated with infant motor development? A general population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297415
Source
Infant Behav Dev. 2018 05; 51:1-14
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Susanna Kovaniemi
Jaana Alakortes
Alice S Carter
Anneli Yliherva
Risto Bloigu
Leena O Joskitt
Irma K Moilanen
Hanna E Ebeling
Author Affiliation
PEDEGO Research Unit, Clinic of Child Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Electronic address: susanna.kovaniemi@student.oulu.fi.
Source
Infant Behav Dev. 2018 05; 51:1-14
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Autism Spectrum Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Development - physiology
Emotions - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology - psychology
Male
Motor Skills - physiology
Parents - psychology
Population Surveillance - methods
Problem Behavior - psychology
Random Allocation
Social Skills
Abstract
Based on limitations in previous research evidence, we concluded that more research is needed for deeper understanding of how social-emotional and behavioral (SEB) outcomes among infant-toddler-aged children in the general population are associated with early motor development. In this study, we investigated associations between early competencies and problems, as measured by the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA), and the timing of achievement of the main gross and fine motor milestones usually attained during the first year of life in a general population context. The study sample consisted of 515 infants (mean age 12.9 [SD 0.9] months) and their parents (514 mothers, 434 fathers), who were recruited in child health centers in Northern Finland. The infants were divided into two groups, based on their BITSEA screen status, and motor milestone achievement ages were compared across BITSEA screen status No Concern and Of-Concern infants. An Of-Concern screen status on the maternal and paternal Competence scale and Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) item cluster was associated with later infant achievement ages for gross motor milestones. By contrast, infants who were screened to be in the Of-Concern range on the maternal Problem scale achieved gross motor milestones earlier than infants with the corresponding No Concern screen status. No significant associations were found between the paternal Problem scale screen status and infant motor development. In further analyses, the strongest associations were found between an Of-Concern screen status on the paternal Competence scale and ASD item cluster and infant motor development. The findings indicate that the inclusion of infant motor developmental information may assist early identification and the clinical interpretation of parental reports of early SEB problems. Clinical implications of the current findings are discussed in the paper.
PubMed ID
29500960 View in PubMed
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Indicators of pain in neonates at risk for neurological impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153989
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Feb;65(2):285-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Bonnie Stevens
Patrick McGrath
Annie Dupuis
Sharyn Gibbins
Joseph Beyene
Lynn Breau
Carol Camfield
Gordon Allen Finley
Linda S Franck
Alexandra Howlett
Celeste Johnston
Patricia McKeever
Karel O'Brien
Arne Ohlsson
Janet Yamada
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. b.stevens@utoronto.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Feb;65(2):285-96
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Facial Expression
Humans
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Nervous System Diseases - diagnosis
Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Pain Measurement - methods - standards
Risk factors
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study to compare the importance and usefulness ratings of physiological and behavioural indicators of pain in neonates at risk for neurological impairment by nurse clinicians and pain researchers.
Neonates at risk for neurological impairment have not been systematically included in neonatal pain measure development and how clinicians and researchers view pain indicators in these infants is unknown.
Data triangulation was undertaken in three Canadian Neonatal Intensive Care Units using data from: (a) 149 neonates at high, moderate and low risk for neurological impairment, (b) 95 nurse clinicians from the three units where infant data were collected and (c) 14 international pain researchers. Thirteen indicators were assessed following heel lance in neonates and 39 indicators generated from nurse clinicians and pain researchers were assessed for importance and accuracy. Data were collected between 2004 and 2005.
Across risk groups, indicators with the highest accuracy for discriminating 'pain' among neonates were: brow bulge (77-83%), eye squeeze (75-84%), nasolabial furrow (79-81%), and total facial expression (78-83%). Correlations between nurse ratings and neonatal accuracy scores ranged from moderate to none (mild risk r = 0.52, P = 0.07; moderate r = 0.43, P = 0.15; high r = -0.12, P = 0.69). Researchers demonstrated a better understanding of the importance of pain indicators (mild risk, r = 0.91, P
PubMed ID
19040693 View in PubMed
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Infant attachment and toddlers' sleep assessed by maternal reports and actigraphy: different measurement methods yield different relations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116146
Source
J Pediatr Psychol. 2013 Jun;38(5):473-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Valérie Simard
Annie Bernier
Marie-Ève Bélanger
Julie Carrier
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université de Sherbrooke (campus Longueuil), 150 place Charles-Le Moyne, Bureau 200, Longueuil, QC, Canada, J4K 0A8. valerie.simard@usherbrooke.ca
Source
J Pediatr Psychol. 2013 Jun;38(5):473-83
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - methods
Canada
Child Behavior - physiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Mothers
Object Attachment
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sleep - physiology
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate relations between children's attachment and sleep, using objective and subjective sleep measures. Secondarily, to identify the most accurate actigraphy algorithm for toddlers.
55 mother-child dyads took part in the Strange Situation Procedure (18 months) to assess attachment. At 2 years, children wore an Actiwatch for a 72-hr period, and their mothers completed a sleep diary.
The high sensitivity (80) and smoothed actigraphy algorithms provided the most plausible sleep data. Maternal diaries yielded longer estimated sleep duration and shorter wake duration at night and showed poor agreement with actigraphy. More resistant attachment behavior was not associated with actigraphy-assessed sleep, but was associated with longer nocturnal wake duration as estimated by mothers, and with a reduced actigraphy-diary discrepancy.
Mothers of children with resistant attachment are more aware of their child's nocturnal awakenings. Researchers and clinicians should select the best sleep measurement method for their specific needs.
PubMed ID
23428653 View in PubMed
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Parallel incidences of sudden infant death syndrome and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: a common cause?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58594
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):E70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
S. Persson
A. Ekbom
F. Granath
A. Nordenskjöld
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):E70
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gastric Emptying - physiology
Hospital Records - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypertrophy - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Posture - physiology
Prone Position - physiology
Pyloric Stenosis - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Pylorus - surgery
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep - physiology
Stomach - radiography
Sudden Infant Death - epidemiology - etiology
Supine Position - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there was a correlation between the incidence of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) and the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) during the period 1970 to 1997 and to discuss different causative factors that could be influencing the changing trend in incidence. METHODS: We compared the incidence of IHPS in the Stockholm Health Care Region with the incidence of SIDS in Sweden each year between 1970 and 1997. First, the relation was assessed by calculation of a correlation coefficient; second, the relative linear decrease was estimated for the time period 1990 to 1997. RESULTS: The incidence of IHPS increased steadily during the 1970s, from 0.5 per 1000 live births in 1970 to 2.7 in 1979. During the 1980s, the average incidence was 2.8. During the 1990s, there was a significant decrease in the number of IHPS cases in Stockholm. The incidence rate of IHPS parallels the incidence of SIDS during the study period (r = 0.58). The incidence of SIDS dropped after the risk-reduction campaign in the beginning of the 1990s, which recommended that infants sleep on their back. We could not identify any other changes of behavioral risk factors in early exposures that could explain the temporal trends. CONCLUSIONS: The statistical findings suggest that IHPS and SIDS have causative factors in common. We suggest that prone sleeping is one of those factors.
PubMed ID
11581478 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.