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Actuarial survival of a large Canadian cohort of preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172012
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2005;5:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Huw P Jones
Stella Karuri
Catherine M G Cronin
Arne Ohlsson
Abraham Peliowski
Anne Synnes
Shoo K Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, St Mary's Hospital, Portsmouth, UK. joneshuw@doctors.org.uk
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2005;5:40
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Age Factors
Birth weight
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Multiple Birth Offspring - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The increased survival of preterm and very low birth weight infants in recent years has been well documented but continued surveillance is required in order to monitor the effects of new therapeutic interventions. Gestation and birth weight specific survival rates most accurately reflect the outcome of perinatal care. Our aims were to determine survival to discharge for a large Canadian cohort of preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to examine the effect of gender on survival and the effect of increasing postnatal age on predicted survival.
Outcomes for all 19,507 infants admitted to 17 NICUs throughout Canada between January 1996 and October 1997 were collected prospectively. Babies with congenital anomalies were excluded from the study population. Gestation and birth weight specific survival for all infants with birth weight
Notes
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PubMed ID
16280080 View in PubMed
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Advanced pubertal growth spurt in subjects born preterm: the Helsinki study of very low birth weight adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138699
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Petteri Hovi
Leo Dunkel
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, Mannerheimintie 164, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. karoliina.wehkalampi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
Male
Menarche - physiology
Parents
Pregnancy
Puberty - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Voice - physiology
Abstract
Among people born at term, low birth weight is associated with early puberty. Early maturation may be on the pathway linking low birth weight with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW;
PubMed ID
21147886 View in PubMed
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Advanced sleep-wake rhythm in adults born prematurely: confirmation by actigraphy-based assessment in the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262758
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Johan Björkqvist
Juulia Paavonen
Sture Andersson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Johan Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Petteri Hovi
Eero Kajantie
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested a propensity towards morningness in teenagers and adults born preterm. We set out to study sleep in a subsample from The Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults cohort, with emphasis on sleep timing, duration, and quality. We compared young adults who were born prematurely at very low birth weight (VLBW;?
PubMed ID
24980065 View in PubMed
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Alberta's infant mortality rate: the effect of the registration of live newborns weighing less than 500 grams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205198
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 May-Jun;89(3):188-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L W Svenson
D P Schopflocher
R S Sauve
C M Robertson
Author Affiliation
Health Surveillance Branch, Alberta Health, Edmonton. svensl@mail.health.gov.ab.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 May-Jun;89(3):188-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Registries
PubMed ID
9654805 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambulatory blood pressure in young adults with very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148247
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Petteri Hovi
Sture Andersson
Katri Räikkönen
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Riikka Pyhälä
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. petteri.hovi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
We hypothesized that, as compared with a matched control group born at term, young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW
PubMed ID
19796771 View in PubMed
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Anthropometry of Malawian live births between 35 and 41 weeks of gestation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58108
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2005 Sep-Oct;32(5):639-49
Publication Type
Article
Author
B F Kalanda
S. van Buuren
F H Verhoeff
B J Brabin
Author Affiliation
Child and Reproductive Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK.
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2005 Sep-Oct;32(5):639-49
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Arm
Birth weight
Body Height
Cephalometry
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Malawi
Male
Pregnancy
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this analysis was to construct cross-sectional gestational age specific percentile curves for birthweight, length, head and mid-arm circumference for Malawian babies, and to compare these percentiles with reference values for babies born to women with normal pregnancies, from a developed country. A cross-sectional study which enrolled pregnant women attending two study hospitals between March 1993 and July 1994 was undertaken. Data on maternal socio-economic status, newborn anthropometry, previous obstetric history and current pregnancy were collected. Smoothed percentile values were derived using the LMS method. Malawian reference percentiles were constructed for fetal growth from 35 weeks' gestation for singleton births. Mean birthweight, length and head circumference were lower at all gestational ages for Malawian compared with Swedish newborns. Fetal growth per completed gestational week was higher by 60 g in weight, 0.5 cm in length and 0.2 cm in head circumference in Swedish compared with Malawian babies. Growth restriction was present from 35 to 41 weeks' gestation. The pattern for the 10th percentile suggested that this was occurring from well before 35 weeks' gestation in a proportion of babies.
PubMed ID
16316919 View in PubMed
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Are very low birthweight births among American Indians and Alaska Natives underregistered?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6772
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Dec;28(6):1096-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
K E Heck
K C Schoendorf
J. Parker
Author Affiliation
National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Dec;28(6):1096-101
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Educational Status
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Survival Rate
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: International infant mortality rates vary widely. This variation has been attributed to many factors, including differential reporting. In the US, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), who generally have low socioeconomic status, have a low neonatal mortality rate. One possible explanation is underregistration of very low birthweight (VLBW,
PubMed ID
10661653 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arginine supplementation prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in the premature infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190223
Source
J Pediatr. 2002 Apr;140(4):425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Harish J Amin
Samuel A Zamora
Douglas D McMillan
Gordon H Fick
J Decker Butzner
Howard G Parsons
R Brent Scott
Author Affiliation
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 2002 Apr;140(4):425-31
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arginine - blood - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Enterocolitis, Necrotizing - blood - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Gestational Age
Glutamine - blood
Humans
Incidence
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine whether supplementation with L -arginine reduces the incidence of all stages of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants with birth weight
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2002 Apr;140(4):389-9112006949
PubMed ID
12006956 View in PubMed
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Assessing the feasibility and acceptability of an intervention to reduce anxiety and enhance sensitivity among mothers of very low birth-weight infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154928
Source
Adv Neonatal Care. 2008 Oct;8(5):276-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Nancy Feeley
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Lyne Charbonneau
Carole Cormier
Annie Lacroix
Chantal Ste Marie
Apostolos Papageorgiou
Author Affiliation
Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. nancy.feeley@mcgill.ca
Source
Adv Neonatal Care. 2008 Oct;8(5):276-84
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - prevention & control
Cognitive Therapy
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Intervention Studies
Maternal Behavior
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Pilot Projects
Quebec
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Abstract
A pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an intervention program for mothers of very low birth-weight infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
Thirty-three mothers of infants born weighing less than 1500 g.
A single-group, pretest-posttest design was used.
Preintervention mothers completed self-report questionnaires and their interaction with their infant was observed. Mothers then received the intervention program. Mothers were assessed twice postintervention, first when the infant was 1/2 months old and again at 6 months. At the postintervention assessments, mothers completed the same questionnaires and interaction was observed.
Mothers completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the revised Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, the NICU Parental Beliefs Scale, and the Perinatal PTSD Questionnaire. Interactions between mothers and infants were rated by trained research staff using the Index of Parental Behaviour in the NICU. Postintervention mothers also responded to a questionnaire that assessed their perceptions of the intervention program.
It was feasible to enroll mothers because 62% of eligible mothers agreed to participate. However, 39% of mothers who enrolled withdrew. Most of the mothers who withdrew did so before even beginning the intervention, and many of these women were mothers of multiples. It was also feasible to provide the intervention because more than 80% of mothers who began the intervention received all 6 teaching sessions. Mothers found both the content and the format of the program to be acceptable. There were nonetheless several challenges in conducting an intervention study with mothers early in the NICU hospitalization.
The results of this pilot study are encouraging. It was found to be both feasible and acceptable to provide the intervention program to mothers during the NICU hospitalization. The effectiveness of this program needs to be assessed in a randomized controlled trial.
PubMed ID
18827517 View in PubMed
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252 records – page 1 of 26.