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Low birth weight and psychiatric morbidity; stability and change between adolescence and young adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127087
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2012 Aug;88(8):623-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Line K Lund
Torstein Vik
Jon Skranes
Stian Lydersen
Ann-Mari Brubakk
Marit S Indredavik
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. line.k.lund@ntnu.no
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2012 Aug;88(8):623-9
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Morbidity
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Being born with low birth weight is a risk factor for psychiatric morbidity. Few longitudinal studies have included diagnostic assessment and followed subjects into adulthood.
To assess stability and change in psychiatric morbidity between adolescence and young adulthood in low birth weight subjects, and explore whether screening in adolescence can predict subsequent psychopathology in these groups.
Prospective geographically based follow-up study of two low birth weight groups and a control group born between 1986 and 1988, assessed at 14 (T1) and 20 (T2) years of age.
Thirty eight subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW: =1500g), 43 born at term but small for gestational age (SGA:
PubMed ID
22325843 View in PubMed
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Mental health, quality of life and social relations in young adults born with low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118369
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:146
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Line K Lund
Torstein Vik
Stian Lydersen
Gro C C Løhaugen
Jon Skranes
Ann-Mari Brubakk
Marit S Indredavik
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. line.k.lund@ntnu.no
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:146
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - psychology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Norway - epidemiology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Being born with low birth weight may have an impact on different aspects of mental health, psychosocial functioning and well-being; however results from studies in young adulthood have so far yielded mixed findings. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term impact in young adulthood on self-reported mental health, health-related quality of life, self-esteem and social relations by investigating differences between two low birth weight groups and a control group.
In a follow-up at 20 years of age, 43 preterm VLBW (birth weight = 1500 g), 55 term SGA (birth weight
Notes
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PubMed ID
23216805 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychiatric Disorders and General Functioning in Low Birth Weight Adults: A Longitudinal Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283534
Source
Pediatrics. 2017 Feb;139(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017

Psychiatric symptoms in low birth weight adolescents, assessed by screening questionnaires.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29638
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;14(4):226-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Marit S Indredavik
Torstein Vik
Sonja Heyerdahl
Siri Kulseng
Ann-Mari Brubakk
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7489 Trondheim, Norway. marit.s.indredavik@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;14(4):226-36
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Interview, Psychological
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric symptoms in low birth weight adolescents, and the usefulness of questionnaires compared with psychiatric interview. DESIGN/STUDY GROUPS: A population-based follow-up study of 56 very low birth weight (VLBW), 60 term small for gestational age (SGA) and 83 control adolescents at 14 years of age was made. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) were rated by adolescents, parents and teachers. The results were compared with diagnostic assessment based on the semi-structured interview, Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children (K-SADS). RESULTS: VLBW adolescents had more psychiatric symptoms than controls, especially attention deficit, emotional, behavioural, social and also academic problems. Although less consistent, the SGA group had more emotional, conduct and attention deficit symptoms than controls. Results remained essentially the same when adolescents with low estimated IQ were excluded, and persisted after controlling for possible confounders. The sensitivity and specificity of ASEBA and SDQ differed between informants and groups. CONCLUSION: VLBW adolescents are at risk of developing psychiatric symptoms, and reduced social and academic skills by the age of 14. Term SGA adolescents may have discrete emotional, behavioural and attention deficit symptoms. ASEBA and SDQ provide a useful supplement to psychiatric interview.
PubMed ID
15981134 View in PubMed
Less detail