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A 14-year follow-up of children with normal and abnormal birth weight for their gestational age. A population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239462
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
P. Rantakallio
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child Development
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Mortality
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Mortality, major neurological handicaps--including mental retardation, cerebral palsy and epilepsy--educational subnormality and height at 14 years of age were studied by birth weight percentiles in a birth cohort of 12 000 children from northern Finland. Infant mortality was significantly higher below the mean -2 SD, 10th and 25th percentiles, than in the median class, from 25th to 75th percentiles, but mortality from one to 14 years only in the lowest weight class. Educational subnormality, including mental retardation +/- some other handicap, was highly significantly more frequent in all the percentile classes lower than the median class but showed no significant tendency to be less frequent in the percentiles over the median. It was also highly significantly more frequent among the preterm than the term infant. The number of children with a major neurological handicap but normal school performance did not vary significantly by birth weight percentiles or by gestational age. Height at 14 years increased significantly by birth weight percentiles. The height of the boys with birth weight mean - and +2 SD was nevertheless within the 25th-75th percentiles for height at 14 years in general, while the height of the girls came close to these percentile limits. The preterm infants were significantly shorter than the term infants at 14 years.
PubMed ID
3984729 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin levels measured in dried blood spot samples from neonates born small and appropriate for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162263
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
A. Klamer
K. Skogstrand
D M Hougaard
B. Nørgaard-Petersen
A. Juul
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology (section 5021), National University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. anja.klamer@rh.dk
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Cross Reactions - physiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - blood
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - blood
Male
Maternal Age
Abstract
Adiponectin levels measured in neonatal dried blood spot samples (DBSS) might be affected by both prematurity and being born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of the study was to measure adiponectin levels in routinely collected neonatal DBSS taken on day 5 (range 3-12) postnatal from infants.
A retrospective case-control study.
One hundred and twenty-two infants: 62 very premature (34 SGA) and 60 mature infants (27 SGA). Adiponectin concentrations were determined in stored neonatal DBSS using a sandwich immunoassay based on flow metric Luminex xMap technology.
Adiponectin was measurable in all samples, and repeated measurements correlated significantly (r = 0.94). Adiponectin concentrations were negatively associated with both SGA (B = -0.283, P = 0.04) and prematurity (B = -2.194, P
PubMed ID
17656597 View in PubMed
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Advanced maternal age and the outcomes of preterm neonates: a social paradox?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131136
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Oct;118(4):872-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Jaideep Kanungo
Andrew James
Douglas McMillan
Abhay Lodha
Daniel Faucher
Shoo K Lee
Prakesh S Shah
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Oct;118(4):872-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Chorioamnionitis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Steroids - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the effect of maternal age on survival free of major morbidity among preterm newborns younger than 33 weeks of gestation at birth.
Data from a retrospective cohort of preterm newborns younger than 33 weeks of gestation admitted to Canadian neonatal intensive care units between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary outcome was survival without major morbidity (defined as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3 or 4, periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity stage 3, 4 or 5, or necrotizing enterocolitis stage 2 or 3). Trends in outcomes in relation to maternal age groups were examined using a multivariable analysis that controlled for confounders.
Baseline comparison for the 12,326 eligible newborns revealed no differences in sex, small-for-gestational-age status, and chorioamnionitis among different maternal age groups. Higher rates of cesarean delivery, use of prenatal steroids, maternal hypertension, and diabetes were noted as maternal age increased (P
PubMed ID
21934451 View in PubMed
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Advanced sleep-wake rhythm in adults born prematurely: confirmation by actigraphy-based assessment in the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262758
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Johan Björkqvist
Juulia Paavonen
Sture Andersson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Johan Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Petteri Hovi
Eero Kajantie
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested a propensity towards morningness in teenagers and adults born preterm. We set out to study sleep in a subsample from The Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults cohort, with emphasis on sleep timing, duration, and quality. We compared young adults who were born prematurely at very low birth weight (VLBW;?
PubMed ID
24980065 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of antidepressant use in pregnancy: an evaluation of fetal growth and preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149046
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2010;27(1):35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
A. Einarson
J. Choi
T R Einarson
G. Koren
Author Affiliation
The Motherisk Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. einarson@sickkids.ca
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2010;27(1):35-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced - epidemiology
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnancy outcome
Risk
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
To compare the rates of low birth weight, preterm delivery and small for gestational age (SGA), in pregnancy outcomes among women who were exposed and nonexposed to antidepressants during pregnancy.
At The Motherisk Program, we analyzed pregnancy outcomes of 1,243 women in our database who took various antidepressants during their pregnancy. Nine hundred and twenty-eight of these women and 928 nonexposed women who delivered a live born infant were matched for age, (+/-2 years), smoking and alcohol use and specific pregnancy outcomes were compared between the two groups.
There were 82 (8.8%) preterm deliveries in the antidepressant group and 50 (5.4%) in the comparison group. OR: 1.7 (95% CI: 1.18-2.45). There were 89 (9.6%) in the antidepressant group and 76 (8.2%) in the comparison group who delivered babies evaluated as SGA; OR: 1.19 (95% CI: 0.86-1.64). The mean birth weight in the antidepressant group was 3,449+/-591 g and 3,455+/-515 g in the comparison group (P=.8).
The use of antidepressants in pregnancy appears to be associated with a small, but statistically significant increased rate in the incidence of preterm births, confirming results from several other studies. It is difficult to ascertain whether this small increased rate of preterm births is confounded by depression, antidepressants, or both. However, we did not find a statistically significant difference in the incidence of SGA or lower birth weight. This information adds to limited data available in the literature regarding these outcomes following the use of antidepressants in pregnancy.
PubMed ID
19691030 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes related to advanced maternal age compared with smoking and being overweight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105162
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):104-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Ulla Waldenström
Vigdis Aasheim
Anne Britt Vika Nilsen
Svein Rasmussen
Hans Järnbert Pettersson
Erica Schytt
Erica Shytt
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, and the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset (KI SÖS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, and the Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Falun, Sweden; and the Center for Evidence Based Practice, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bergen University College, and the Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):104-12
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association between advanced maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcomes and to compare the risks related to advanced maternal age with those related to smoking and being overweight or obese.
A population-based register study including all nulliparous women aged 25 years and older with singleton pregnancies at 22 weeks of gestation or greater who gave birth in Sweden and Norway from 1990 to 2010; 955,804 women were analyzed. In each national sample, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of very preterm birth, moderately preterm birth, small for gestational age, low Apgar score, fetal death, and neonatal death in women aged 30-34 years (n=319,057), 35-39 years (n=94,789), and 40 years or older (n=15,413) were compared with those of women aged 25-29 years (n=526,545). In the Swedish sample, the number of additional cases of each outcome associated with maternal age 30 years or older, smoking, and overweight or obesity, respectively, was estimated in relation to a low-risk group of nonsmokers of normal weight and aged 25-29 years.
The adjusted OR of all outcomes increased by maternal age in a similar way in Sweden and Norway; and the risk of fetal death was increased even in the 30- to 34-year-old age group (Sweden n=826, adjusted OR 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.37; Norway n=472, adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.12-1.41). Maternal age 30 years or older was associated with the same number of additional cases of fetal deaths (n=251) as overweight or obesity (n=251).
For the individual woman, the absolute risk for each of the outcomes was small, but for society, it may be significant as a result of the large number of women who give birth after the age of 30 years.
II.
Notes
Erratum In: Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Mar;123(3):669Shytt, Erica [corrected to Schytt, Erica]
PubMed ID
24463670 View in PubMed
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[A follow-up study of children with birth weights below 1,500g. A multicenter study of children born in Health region 2 during the period October 1, 1981-September 30, 1983]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38407
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1988 Sep 30;108(27):2254-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1988

An analysis of birth weight by gestational age in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231373
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Jan 15;140(2):157-60, 165
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1989
Author
T E Arbuckle
G J Sherman
Author Affiliation
Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Jan 15;140(2):157-60, 165
Date
Jan-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Canada
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - prevention & control
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Pregnancy
Reference Standards
Sex Factors
Twins
Abstract
Birth-weight-gestational-age standards help to identify infants in need of special care and to determine causes and means for preventing retardation of intrauterine growth. Previously published standards either were based on small samples, data several decades old or characteristics of subpopulations in the United States or they were not specific for type of birth and sex. We compared the data for live births in 1972 with those in 1986 to develop current Canadian standards for type of birth (singleton or twin) and sex. We found that the 10th, 50th and 90th percentile figures for weight were slightly higher in 1986 than in 1972 for term deliveries (at 37 weeks' gestation or later), but the figures were virtually unchanged for preterm deliveries. The availability of reliable population-based standards should enhance the clinician's ability to identify true cases of retardation or acceleration of intrauterine growth.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Apr 20;251(15):1978-826700100
Cites: J Pediatr. 1969 Jun;74(6):901-105781799
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1969 May 10;100(18):842-55770707
Cites: Pediatrics. 1963 Nov;32:793-80014075621
Cites: Biol Neonate. 1972;20(3):175-885071656
Cites: Semin Perinatol. 1984 Jan;8(1):5-146710174
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Br Commonw. 1974 Dec;81(12):956-674452923
Cites: Pediatrics. 1970 Jun;45(6):937-445422116
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Jan 15;130(2):133-406692192
Cites: Early Hum Dev. 1983 Oct;8(3-4):189-936641564
Cites: South Med J. 1983 Nov;76(11):1401-66635732
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1976 Nov 1;126(5):555-64984126
Comment In: CMAJ. 1989 Sep 1;141(5):375-62766172
PubMed ID
2597238 View in PubMed
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Angiogenic factors in maternal circulation and preeclampsia with or without fetal growth restriction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121745
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1388-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Lars J Vatten
Bjørn O Åsvold
Anne Eskild
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1388-94
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Birth weight
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Norway
Pre-Eclampsia - blood
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Proteins - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 - blood
Abstract
To study associations of placental growth factor (PlGF) and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) in maternal circulation with the risk of preeclampsia with and without fetal growth restriction.
Nested case-control study.
A cohort of 29 948 pregnant women in Norway.
Cases were identified through linkage to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We selected 69 preterm and 36 term preeclampsia cases with delivery of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant, 83 preterm and 154 term preeclampsia cases without SGA delivery, and 384 normotensive controls.
We measured PlGF and sFlt-1 in maternal serum samples from each trimester.
Odds ratios of preeclampsia subtypes by tertile categories of PlGF and sFlt-1.
Low (lowest third) PlGF and sFlt-1 levels in the first trimester, and low (lowest third) increase in PlGF and strong (highest third) increase in sFlt-1 from first to second trimester were associated with increased risk of preterm preeclampsia, both with and without SGA offspring. For term preeclampsia with SGA offspring, the associations were similar to the findings for preterm preeclampsia. For term preeclampsia without SGA offspring, low increase in PlGF from first to second trimester and high sFlt-1 in the third trimester were associated with increased risk.
Low PlGF and high sFlt-1 levels in maternal circulation are associated with subsequent development of preeclampsia, regardless of whether fetal growth is affected or not. For term preeclampsia without fetal growth restriction, the imbalance in angiogenic factors seems to appear later in pregnancy than for preterm preeclampsia.
PubMed ID
22882089 View in PubMed
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An increase of the plasma N-terminal peptide of proatrial natriuretic peptide in preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59084
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 May;89(5 Pt 1):747-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A M Pouta
O J Vuolteenaho
T J Laatikainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 May;89(5 Pt 1):747-53
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypertension - metabolism - ultrasonography
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Pre-Eclampsia - metabolism - ultrasonography
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - metabolism - ultrasonography
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Protein Precursors - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether increased concentrations of the N-terminal peptide of proatrial natriuretic peptide and of atrial natriuretic peptide are related to the severity of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 70 healthy pregnant women, 48 women with preeclampsia, and 19 women with gestational hypertension in the third trimester. We used a specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) method suitable for the determination of the plasma N-terminal peptide of proatrial natriuretic peptide in unextracted plasma. The atrial natriuretic peptide was measured by RIA from Sep-Pak C18-extracted plasma. RESULTS: The N-terminal peptide of proatrial natriuretic peptide levels were significantly higher in preeclamptic women than in healthy pregnant controls (median 571 [range 189-2000] versus 266 pmol/L [80-634], P
PubMed ID
9166314 View in PubMed
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429 records – page 1 of 43.