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Adjusting to being a father to an infant born prematurely: experiences from Swedish fathers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86951
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Lindberg Birgitta
Axelsson Karin
Ohrling Kerstin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. birgitta.lindberg@ltu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Gender Identity
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care, Neonatal - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Narration
Neonatal Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of being a father to a prematurely born infant. Eight fathers of prematurely born children were interviewed using a narrative approach, and a thematic content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The fathers described that the preterm birth gave them the chance to get to know their infant as they had to spend time at the intensive care unit. They also felt better educated by professionals who helped them take care of their infant. Their feelings and attachment for their infant increased over time and the fathers felt that they had a stronger bond with their child compared with friends who had babies born at term. As time passed, they became more confident as a father. In spite of the strain, the experience made them change as a person and they expressed having different values. The relationship with their partner was strengthened as they handled this situation together as a couple. However, the fathers felt fortunate despite everything and described having managed a prematurely born infant rather well. Although there are similarities between being a father to a child born at term and to one born preterm, it is significant to gain further knowledge about the specific experiences of fathers of prematurely born infants. The results of this study have implications for nurses working with families who have children born prematurely.
PubMed ID
18269426 View in PubMed
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Behavioural symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in preterm and term children born small and appropriate for gestational age: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138618
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kati Heinonen
Katri Räikkönen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Johan G Eriksson
Dieter Wolke
Aulikki Lano
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioral Science, P.O. Box 9, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. kati.heinonen@helsinki.fi
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:91
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
It remains unclear whether it is more detrimental to be born too early or too small in relation to symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Thus, we tested whether preterm birth and small body size at birth adjusted for gestational age are independently associated with symptoms of ADHD in children.
A longitudinal regional birth cohort study comprising 1535 live-born infants between 03/15/1985 and 03/14/1986 admitted to the neonatal wards and 658 randomly recruited non-admitted infants, in Finland. The present study sample comprised 828 children followed up to 56 months. The association between birth status and parent-rated ADHD symptoms of the child was analysed with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses.
Neither prematurity (birth
Notes
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PubMed ID
21159164 View in PubMed
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Clinging to closeness: The parental view on developing a close bond with their infants in a NICU.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295267
Source
Midwifery. 2018 Jul; 62:183-188
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Heli Mäkelä
Anna Axelin
Nancy Feeley
Hannakaisa Niela-Vilén
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland; Satakunta Hospital District, 28500 Pori, Finland. Electronic address: heli.makela@satshp.fi.
Source
Midwifery. 2018 Jul; 62:183-188
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - organization & administration
Male
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Qualitative Research
Smartphone
Abstract
To identify and understand how parents develop a close bond to their infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
A qualitative descriptive study; closeness and separation stories recorded in a smartphone application by the parents were analyzed using thematic analysis.
Twenty-three parents of nineteen infants who were taken care of in a level III NICU in Finland.
Bonding moments and a disrupted dyadic parent-infant relationship continuously alternated as in a rollercoaster ride during the hospital stay. Transitions from closeness to separation and vice versa were the most emotional stages on the journey. Parents had a natural desire to be close and create a bond with their infants; however, they accepted the separation as part of NICU care.
The findings indicate that closeness with their infant was the power that parents stored and that led them through unavoidable separation to normal parenthood.
Bonding and attachment will occur naturally if parents are close to their infants and permitted privacy and time with their infants. NICU staff should create a peaceful and calming environment that enables and supports this bonding process.
PubMed ID
29684798 View in PubMed
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Cognitive outcome at 2 years of age in Finnish infants with very low birth weight born between 2001 and 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147391
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2010 Mar;99(3):359-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
P. Munck
L. Haataja
J. Maunu
R. Parkkola
H. Rikalainen
H. Lapinleimu
L. Lehtonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. petmun@utu.fi
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2010 Mar;99(3):359-66
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - psychology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To study cognitive outcome of premature, very low birth weight (VLBW) infants in relation to parental education and neonatal data.
A regional cohort of 182 VLBW infants born between 2001 and 2006 was followed up. Brain ultrasounds (US) were examined serially until term age and brain magnetic resonance imaging at term age. Neurological status was examined systematically. Cognitive development was assessed using the Mental Developmental Index (MDI) of Bayley Scales at 2 years of corrected age. A total of 192 healthy full-term (FT) controls were assessed with the MDI at 2 years of age.
The mean MDI in VLBW infants was 101.7 (SD 15.4), which was lower compared with FT controls (109.8, SD 11.7, p
PubMed ID
19912142 View in PubMed
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Dental behavioural management problems and dental caries prevalence in 3- to 6-year-old Swedish children born preterm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91968
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2008 Sep;18(5):341-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Brogårdh-Roth Susanne
Stjernqvist Karin
Matsson Lars
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. susanne.brogardh@od.mah.se
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2008 Sep;18(5):341-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dental Audit
Dental Care for Children - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Prevalence
Reference Values
Survivors - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Refusal - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND:Today, most children born preterm survive without major impairments. But high frequencies of cognitive and behavioural difficulties arise. Studies on dental behavioural management problems (DBMP) in these children are lacking. In addition, studies on caries prevalence are few and inconclusive.AIM:This study aims to compare the frequency of behavioural problems and poor compliance with dental treatment in preschool children born preterm with those born full-term. The prevalence of caries was also studied.METHODS:The study group included 187 children born between 23 and 32 weeks of gestation. The control group constituted full-term children matched by age, sex, immigrant background, and dental operator. DBMP, number of dental visits, missed appointments, and caries between ages 3 and 6 were noted.RESULTS:At age 3, but not at age 6, the prevalence of DBMP at clinical examinations was significantly higher in preterm children compared with the control group. Of the children who received dental treatments during preschool years, preterm children displayed significantly more DBMP. No significant difference in dental visits or in caries prevalence was found. Preterm children, however, missed significantly more dental appointments.CONCLUSION:Children born preterm display a higher prevalence of DBMP at dental examinations and treatments during preschool years.
PubMed ID
18802992 View in PubMed
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From distance toward proximity: fathers lived experience of caring for their preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87524
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2007 Dec;22(6):490-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Lundqvist Pia
Westas Lena Hellström
Hallström Inger
Author Affiliation
Neonatal Unit, Children's Hospital, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. pia_x.lundqvist@med.lu.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2007 Dec;22(6):490-7
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude to Health
Empathy
Family Nursing
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - education - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care, Neonatal - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Neonatal Nursing
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Object Attachment
Patient-Centered Care
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Open interviews with 13 fathers were performed, using a hermeneutic phenomenological method, to illuminate their lived experience of caring for their preterm infant. Their lived experience was expressed as a process moving from initial feelings of distance toward feelings of proximity. The process was described as a pendulum that was easily disturbed. Feelings of distance included experiences of living beside reality, becoming an outsider, and living with worry. Feelings of proximity included experiences of returning to reality, becoming a family, and facing the future. Illumination of the father-infant interaction adds to the family-centered body of knowledge in neonatal nursing.
PubMed ID
18036470 View in PubMed
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[Health for everyone by the year 2000--challenges in the newborn period].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206876
Source
Katilolehti. 1997 Oct;102(5):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997

Individual neuropsychological profiles at age 5½ years in children born preterm in relation to medical risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126498
Source
Child Neuropsychol. 2013;19(3):313-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Aiko Lundequist
Birgitta Böhm
Ann-Charlotte Smedler
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. aiko.lundequist@ki.se
Source
Child Neuropsychol. 2013;19(3):313-31
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Development
Cluster analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Follow-up studies of preterm children have reported a range of cognitive deficits, particularly in executive functions, visuospatial abilities, and learning. However, few researchers have adopted a person-oriented approach, exploring individual neuropsychological profiles. The aim of this study was to identify typical neuropsychological profiles among preterm children and control children, respectively. A second aim was to investigate if neuropsychological profiles at age 5½ might be associated with perinatal medical risk factors. As part of the longitudinal Stockholm Neonatal Project, NEPSY for 4- to 7-year-old children ( Korkman, 1990 ), WPPSI-R, and Movement ABC were administered at age 5½ years to 145 preterm (mean gestational age 28 weeks) and 117 control children born at term. For the present study, the NEPSY results of each child were transformed into summary z scores for each of 5 neuropsychological domains: attention, memory, sensory-motor, verbal, and visuospatial functions. Subsequently, Ward's cluster analysis was performed for the preterm and control groups separately, identifying 5 neuropsychological profiles in both groups explaining around 56% and 57% of the variance, respectively. Overall, preterm children had lower neuropsychological results but also more diverging profiles compared to controls. The variability in outcome could not be sufficiently explained by birth weight, gestational age, or medical risks. The results suggest that prematurity interacts dynamically with genetic, medical, and environmental factors in neuropsychological development.
PubMed ID
22384932 View in PubMed
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Low birth weight and parenting stress during early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208302
Source
J Pediatr Psychol. 1997 Jun;22(3):297-311
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A L Robson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, UWO, London, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Psychol. 1997 Jun;22(3):297-311
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Family Health
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Identified factors associated with parenting stress among the parents of low birth weight children participating in a prospective longitudinal study. The child's development status and the quality of the infant-parent relationship contributed to early childhood parenting stress beyond the contribution of neonatal medical risk, which was a significant predictor until the concurrent measure of child development status was entered in the regression analysis. Results are consistent with a model of processes underlying the experiences of parents of medically vulnerable infants presented by the Goldberg and Marcovitch (1986) model. Replication of these findings among parents of specific subgroups of low birth weight children represents a direction for future research.
PubMed ID
9212549 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.