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743 records – page 1 of 75.

A 1-year follow-up of low birth weight infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia: health, growth, clinical lung disease, cardiovascular and neurological sequelae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59584
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1992 Sep;30(2):109-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992

A 12-year cohort study on adverse pregnancy outcomes in Eastern Townships of Canada: impact of endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256963
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Aziz Aris
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Clinical Research Centre of Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre , Sherbrooke, Quebec , Canada.
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Peritoneal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide a temporal-spatial reference of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) and examine whether endometriosis promotes APO in the same population. Among the 31?068 women who had a pregnancy between 1997 and 2008 in Eastern Townships of Canada, 6749 (21.7%) had APO. These APO increased significantly with maternal age and over time (r(2?)=?0.522, p?=?0.008); and were dominated by preterm birth (9.3%), pregnancy-induced hypertension (8.3%) including gestational hypertension (6.5%), low birth weight (6.3%), gestational diabetes (3.4%), pregnancy loss (2.2%) including spontaneous abortion (1.5%) and stillbirth (0.6%), intrauterine growth restriction (2.1%) and preeclampsia (1.8%). Among the 31?068 pregnancies, 784 (2.5%) had endometriosis and 183 (23.3%) had both endometriosis and APO. Endometriosis has been shown to increase the incidence of fetal loss (OR?=?2.03; 95% CI?=?1.42-2.90, p?
PubMed ID
24134807 View in PubMed
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Access to intensive neonatal care and neonatal survival in low birthweight infants: a population study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60131
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1987 Apr;1(1):33-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
J F Forbes
K E Larssen
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Social Paediatric and Obstetric Research Unit, University of Glasgow, Scotland.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1987 Apr;1(1):33-42
Date
Apr-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Norway
Prenatal Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This study evaluates the impact of regional differences in access to intensive neonatal care on neonatal survival in geographically defined populations of 4,692 low birthweight births in Norway 1979-81. For infants weighting 1,250 to 2,499 g our results are consistent with the existence of a dose-response association between neonatal survival and the level of immediate access to intensive neonatal care. Although not statistically significant, there was a clear gradient in the risk of mortality within 24 hours. A similar pattern of survival could not be consistently demonstrated for infants weighing less than 1,250 g.
PubMed ID
3506188 View in PubMed
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Addison's disease in women is a risk factor for an adverse pregnancy outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140577
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5249-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Sigridur Björnsdottir
Sven Cnattingius
Lena Brandt
Anna Nordenström
Anders Ekbom
Olle Kämpe
Sophie Bensing
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. Sigridur.Bjornsdottir@karolinska.se
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5249-57
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Addison Disease - complications - epidemiology - immunology - mortality
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Diseases - complications
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) tends to affect young and middle-aged women. It is not known whether the existence of undiagnosed or diagnosed AAD influences the outcome of pregnancy.
The aim of the study was to compare the number of children and pregnancy outcomes in individuals with AAD and controls.
We conducted a population-based historical cohort study in Sweden.
Through the Swedish National Patient Register and the Total Population Register, we identified 1,188 women with AAD and 11,879 age-matched controls who delivered infants between 1973 and 2006.
We measured parity and pregnancy outcome.
Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for infants born to mothers with deliveries 3 yr or less before the diagnosis of AAD were 2.40 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-4.53] for preterm birth (=37 wk), 3.50 (95% CI, 1.83-6.67) for low birth weight (
PubMed ID
20861125 View in PubMed
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Address unknown--or at least uncertain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206146
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):585-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1998
Author
J J McGurran
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):585-6
Date
Mar-10-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Data Collection - methods
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Vital statistics
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 1;157(5):535-419294392
Comment On: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 1;157(5):549-519294395
PubMed ID
9526467 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight among the poor in Washington State and British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218009
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
S J Katz
R W Armstrong
J P LoGerfo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Medicaid
National Health Programs
Odds Ratio
Parity
Poverty
Prenatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Risk factors
United States
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine differences in adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight between low-income women with Medicaid in Washington State and low-income women with Canadian provincial health insurance in British Columbia.
A population-based cross-sectional study was done by using linked birth certificates and claims data.
Overall, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate prenatal care in Washington (comparing women with Medicaid with those with private insurance) was 3.2. However, the risk varied by time of Medicaid enrollment relative to pregnancy (2.0, 1.0, 2.7, 6.3; for women who enrolled prior to pregnancy, during the first trimester, during the second trimester, or during the third trimester, respectively). In British Columbia, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate care (comparing women receiving a health premium subsidy with those receiving no subsidy) was 1.5 for women receiving a 100% subsidy and 1.2 for women receiving a 95% subsidy. The risk for low birthweight followed a similar trend in both regions, but there was no association with enrollment period in Washington.
Overall, the risk for inadequate prenatal care among poor women was much greater in Washington than in British Columbia. Most of the difference was due to Washington women's delayed enrollment in Medicaid. In both regions, the poor were at similar risk for low birthweight relative to their more affluent counterparts.
Notes
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Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1989 May-Jun;5(3):157-632663051
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1989 Summer;10(4):1-1510313273
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Nov 7;264(17):2219-232214099
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1990 Sep-Oct;105(5):533-52120734
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Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 1987 Summer;12(2):221-353302000
Cites: Fam Plann Perspect. 1991 May-Jun;23(3):123-81860478
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jan 6;269(1):87-918416413
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Sep;70(9):964-737406096
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Jan 3;255(1):48-523940304
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(1):41-93805233
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Aug;81(8):1013-61853992
PubMed ID
8203697 View in PubMed
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Adult glucose metabolism in extremely birthweight-discordant monozygotic twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120924
Source
Diabetologia. 2012 Dec;55(12):3204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
M. Frost
I. Petersen
K. Brixen
H. Beck-Nielsen
J J Holst
L. Christiansen
K. Højlund
K. Christensen
Author Affiliation
The Danish Twin Registry, Department of Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, JB Winsløvsvej 9, Odense C, Denmark. frostnielsen@yahoo.com
Source
Diabetologia. 2012 Dec;55(12):3204-12
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Birth weight
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility - blood - epidemiology
Female
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Insulin Resistance
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Low birthweight (BW) is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We compared glucose metabolism in adult BW-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins, thereby controlling for genetic factors and rearing environment.
Among 77,885 twins in the Danish Twin Registry, 155 of the most BW-discordant MZ twin pairs (median BW difference 0.5 kg) were assessed using a 2 h oral glucose tolerance test with sampling of plasma (p-)glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1. HOMA for beta cell function (HOMA-ß) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and also insulin sensitivity index (BIGTT-SI) and acute insulin response (BIGTT-AIR), were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed in those with: (1) double verification of BW difference; (2) difference in BW >0.5 kg; and (3) no overt metabolic disease (type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidaemia or thyroid disease).
No intra-pair differences in p-glucose, insulin, C-peptide, incretin hormones, HOMA-ß, HOMA-IR or BIGTT-SI were identified. p-Glucose at 120 min was higher in the twins with the highest BW without metabolic disease, and BIGTT-AIR was higher in those with the highest BW although not in pairs with a BW difference of >0.5 kg.
BW-discordant MZ twins provide no evidence for a detrimental effect of low BW on glucose metabolism in adulthood once genetic factors and rearing environment are controlled for.
PubMed ID
22955993 View in PubMed
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Advanced Maternal Age and the Risk of Low Birth Weight and Preterm Delivery: a Within-Family Analysis Using Finnish Population Registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287605
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 01;186(11):1219-1226
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Alice Goisis
Hanna Remes
Kieron Barclay
Pekka Martikainen
Mikko Myrskylä
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 01;186(11):1219-1226
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Certificates
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Siblings
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
Advanced maternal age at birth is considered a major risk factor for birth outcomes. It is unclear to what extent this association is confounded by maternal characteristics. To test whether advanced maternal age at birth independently increases the risk of low birth weight (
PubMed ID
29206985 View in PubMed
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Adverse birth outcomes associated with open dumpsites in Alaska Native Villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81448
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Sep 15;164(6):518-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2006
Author
Gilbreath Susan
Kass Philip H
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Sep 15;164(6):518-28
Date
Sep-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Arctic Regions
Birth weight
Chi-Square Distribution
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Hazardous Waste - adverse effects
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Inuits
Logistic Models
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Refuse Disposal
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This retrospective cohort study evaluated adverse birth outcomes in infants whose birth records indicated maternal residence in villages containing dumpsites potentially hazardous to health and environment. Birth records from 1997 to 2001 identified 10,073 eligible infants born to mothers in 197 Alaska Native villages. Outcomes included low or very low birth weight, preterm birth, and intrauterine growth retardation. Infants from mothers in villages with intermediate (odds ratio (OR) = 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 2.84) and high (OR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.28, 3.32) hazard dumpsites had a higher proportion of low birth weight infants than did infants from mothers in the referent category. More infants born to mothers from intermediate (OR = 4.38, 95% CI: 2.20, 8.77) and high (OR = 3.98, 95% CI: 1.93, 8.21) hazard villages suffered from intrauterine growth retardation. On average, infants weighed 36 g less (95% CI: -71.2, -0.8) and 55.4 g less (95% CI: -95.3, -15.6) when born to highly exposed mothers than did infants in the intermediate and low exposure groups, respectively, an effect even larger in births to Alaska Native mothers only. No differences in incidence were detected across exposure levels for other outcomes. This is the first study to evaluate adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with open dumpsites in Alaska Native villages.
PubMed ID
16840520 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of antidepressant use in pregnancy: an evaluation of fetal growth and preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149046
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2010;27(1):35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
A. Einarson
J. Choi
T R Einarson
G. Koren
Author Affiliation
The Motherisk Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. einarson@sickkids.ca
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2010;27(1):35-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced - epidemiology
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnancy outcome
Risk
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
To compare the rates of low birth weight, preterm delivery and small for gestational age (SGA), in pregnancy outcomes among women who were exposed and nonexposed to antidepressants during pregnancy.
At The Motherisk Program, we analyzed pregnancy outcomes of 1,243 women in our database who took various antidepressants during their pregnancy. Nine hundred and twenty-eight of these women and 928 nonexposed women who delivered a live born infant were matched for age, (+/-2 years), smoking and alcohol use and specific pregnancy outcomes were compared between the two groups.
There were 82 (8.8%) preterm deliveries in the antidepressant group and 50 (5.4%) in the comparison group. OR: 1.7 (95% CI: 1.18-2.45). There were 89 (9.6%) in the antidepressant group and 76 (8.2%) in the comparison group who delivered babies evaluated as SGA; OR: 1.19 (95% CI: 0.86-1.64). The mean birth weight in the antidepressant group was 3,449+/-591 g and 3,455+/-515 g in the comparison group (P=.8).
The use of antidepressants in pregnancy appears to be associated with a small, but statistically significant increased rate in the incidence of preterm births, confirming results from several other studies. It is difficult to ascertain whether this small increased rate of preterm births is confounded by depression, antidepressants, or both. However, we did not find a statistically significant difference in the incidence of SGA or lower birth weight. This information adds to limited data available in the literature regarding these outcomes following the use of antidepressants in pregnancy.
PubMed ID
19691030 View in PubMed
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743 records – page 1 of 75.