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12-year data on skin diseases in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases II: Risk occupations with special reference to allergic contact dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311035
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):343-349
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Kirsi Koskela
Maria Pesonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH), Occupational Health Unit, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):343-349
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acrylates - adverse effects
Barbering - statistics & numerical data
Construction Industry - statistics & numerical data
Cooking - statistics & numerical data
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Epoxy Compounds - adverse effects
Farmers - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Housekeeping - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Manufacturing Industry - statistics & numerical data
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Abstract
Detailed epidemiological studies on occupational skin diseases (OSDs) are scarce.
To analyze risk occupations for OSDs in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD).
We retrieved numbers of OSD cases (excluding skin infections) for different occupations from the FROD in 2005-2016. In the FROD, Finnish ISCO-08-based classification of occupations was used since 2011, and the preceding ISCO-88-based version until 2010. We combined cases from the earlier and the later period using conversion tables provided by Statistics Finland. We included occupations with at least five cases and analyzed them in detail. We calculated incidence rates for OSDs and separately for allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in different risk occupations using national labor force statistics. We also studied causes of ACD in these occupations.
Risk occupations with the largest number of OSD cases included farmers, hairdressers, assistant nurses, cooks, cleaners, machinists, and nurses. Occupations with the highest incidences of OSDs comprised spray painters (23.8/10?000 person years), bakers (20.4), and dental technicians (19.0). Epoxy compounds and acrylates were prominent causes of ACD in occupations with the highest incidences of ACD.
Uniform use of International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO) would facilitate comparisons of OSD figures in different countries.
PubMed ID
32144776 View in PubMed
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[An assessment of epidemic outbreaks of salmonellosis connected with poultry plant production].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225422
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Nov;(11):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
V I Sergevnin
L V Kovalevskaia
R A Mikhaeleva
V I Frizen
V A Petrov
N D Pozdeeva
T V Kovaleva
G A Dobrokhotova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Nov;(11):27-30
Date
Nov-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chickens - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Disease Vectors
Eggs - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Meat-Packing Industry - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Poultry Products - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Salmonella enteritidis
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
The causes of the simultaneous rise of salmonellosis morbidity induced by S. enteritidis among the population of three towns in the Perm region were studied. The study revealed the leading role of eggs and chicken meat as factors contributing to the transfer of this infection to the population of different territories, commonly supplied with the products of one poultry plant. The contamination of eggs and chickens with S. enteritidis occurred at the plant due to Salmonella infection of chickens, parallel with the use of nonbalanced mixed fodder, originally intended for feeding swine. Analysis of the epidemic and epizootic processes of Salmonella infection in this epidemic situation made it possible to reliably establish the factors contributing to the transfer of the infective agent and the site of contamination.
PubMed ID
1839812 View in PubMed
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[An evaluation of the scope of the circulation of Salmonella among the workers of commercial poultry- and meat-packing enterprises based on serological study data in the PHA test].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224456
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1992 Feb;(2):51-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
V I Sergevnin
R Kh Khasanov
K T Parfenova
V V Vorob'eva
S D Novgorodova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1992 Feb;(2):51-4
Date
Feb-1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Carrier State - epidemiology - immunology
Hemagglutination Tests
Humans
Meat-Packing Industry - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
Poultry Products
Russia - epidemiology
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Salmonella enteritidis - immunology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Serum samples from 641 workers of large poultry and meat-packing plants were studied in the passive hemagglutination test with the use of Salmonella complex and serogroup diagnostica. A specific increase in the level of anti-Salmonella antibodies in 60.7% of poultry plant workers and in 9.8% of meat-packing plant workers was established. Among the workers of the poultry plants the most pronounced immune shifts were detected in persons having contacts with sick poultry and pathological material and among the employees of the meat-packing plant, in those who ate raw sausage meat. A high level of antibodies in the professional groups under study was observed as early as in the first year of work at the plant and persisted over the whole period of this work. Under the conditions of constant contamination of the workers of poultry and meat-packing plants with small doses of salmonellae specific immunity to this infection was seemingly induced, which inhibited the development of the manifest forms of infection, but did not prevent the formation of chronic carrier state.
PubMed ID
1441814 View in PubMed
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[A new methodological procedure for studying the health status of the population of industrial cities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49319
Source
Lik Sprava. 1992 Oct;(10):23-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
N I Khizhniak
A S Nekrasova
A D Moiseenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 1992 Oct;(10):23-5
Date
Oct-1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Environmental Health - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Health status
Humans
Industry - statistics & numerical data
Ukraine
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Investigation and evaluation of the population health depending on the environment are realized in two directions. One of them are values characterizing separate indices of the health status. The other direction is based on a study of nosological entities observed in separate systems of the body, evaluation of the functional state of these systems in the whole body and determination of their dependence on environmental factors.
PubMed ID
1485438 View in PubMed
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An investigation of the adjustment of retrospective noise exposure for use of hearing protection devices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144810
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2010 Apr;54(3):329-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Hind Sbihi
Kay Teschke
Ying C MacNab
Hugh W Davies
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. sbhi@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2010 Apr;54(3):329-39
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Ear Protective Devices - utilization
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiologic Methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hearing Tests
Humans
Industry - statistics & numerical data
Male
Noise, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
To account for use of hearing protection devices (HPDs) in retrospective noise exposure assessment, adjust noise exposure estimates accordingly, and validate the adjusted estimates.
A previous study in the same working population showed a stronger relation for noise and acute myocardial infarction among those who did not wear HPD. Because accurate noise exposure assessment is complicated by the use of HPD, we previously developed a multilevel model of the likelihood of HPD use for British Columbia (Canada) lumber mill workers. Historical estimates of noise exposure can be adjusted according to models predictions and a reduction in misclassifying workers, exposure is expected.
Work history and exposure information were obtained for 13,147 lumber mill workers followed from 1909 until 1998. Audiometric data for the cohort, including hearing threshold levels at several pure tone frequencies, were obtained from the local regulatory agency for the period from 1978 to 2003. Following the modeling of HPD use, noise estimates were adjusted according to models predictions and attenuation factors based on existing research and standards. Adjusted and unadjusted noise metrics were compared by investigating their ability to predict noise-induced hearing loss.
We showed a 4-fold increase in the noise exposure and hearing loss slope, after adjusting for HPD use, while controlling for gender, age, race, as well as medical and non-occupational confounding variables.
While the relative difference before and after adjustment for use of HPD is considerable, we observed a subtle absolute magnitude of the effect. Using noise-induced hearing loss as a 'gold standard' for testing the assessment of retrospective noise exposure estimates should continue to be investigated.
PubMed ID
20237208 View in PubMed
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Are subjective health complaints a result of modern civilization?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70895
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(2):122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hege R Eriksen
Brit Hellesnes
Peer Staff
Holger Ursin
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, N-5000, Norway. hege.eriksen@psych.uib.no
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(2):122-5
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnology
Female
Humans
Industry - statistics & numerical data
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Philippines
Sick Role
Social Isolation
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Urbanization
Abstract
Subjective health complaints without or with minimal somatic findings (pain, fatigue) are common and frequent reasons for encounter with the general practitioner and for long-term sickness leave and disability. The complaints are often attributed to the stressors of modern life. Is this true? We interviewed 120 Aborigine Mangyans (native population, M age = 33.5 years, 72.5% women) living under primitive conditions in the jungle of Mindoro, an island in the Philippines, and 101 persons living in a small coastal town on the same island (coastal population, M age = 33.8 years, 60.4% women). Both groups had more musculoskeletal complaints, fatigue, mood changes, and gastrointestinal complaints than a representative sample from the Norwegian population (N = 1,243). Our common subjective health complaints, therefore, are not specific for industrialized societies.
PubMed ID
15456682 View in PubMed
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A Bayesian network for assessing the collision induced risk of an oil accident in the Gulf of Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268276
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5301-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-5-2015
Author
Annukka Lehikoinen
Maria Hänninen
Jenni Storgård
Emilia Luoma
Samu Mäntyniemi
Sakari Kuikka
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5301-9
Date
May-5-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Bayes Theorem
Estonia
Finland
Models, Theoretical
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Russia
Ships
Abstract
The growth of maritime oil transportation in the Gulf of Finland (GoF), North-Eastern Baltic Sea, increases environmental risks by increasing the probability of oil accidents. By integrating the work of a multidisciplinary research team and information from several sources, we have developed a probabilistic risk assessment application that considers the likely future development of maritime traffic and oil transportation in the area and the resulting risk of environmental pollution. This metamodel is used to compare the effects of two preventative management actions on the tanker collision probabilities and the consequent risk. The resulting risk is evaluated from four different perspectives. Bayesian networks enable large amounts of information about causalities to be integrated and utilized in probabilistic inference. Compared with the baseline period of 2007-2008, the worst-case scenario is that the risk level increases 4-fold by the year 2015. The management measures are evaluated and found to decrease the risk by 4-13%, but the utility gained by their joint implementation would be less than the sum of their independent effects. In addition to the results concerning the varying risk levels, the application provides interesting information about the relationships between the different elements of the system.
PubMed ID
25780862 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer risk associated with residential proximity to industrial plants in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135269
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2011 May;53(5):522-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Sai Yi Pan
Howard Morrison
Laurie Gibbons
Jia Zhou
Shi Wu Wen
Marie DesMeules
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sai.yi.pan@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2011 May;53(5):522-9
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Industry - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship between breast cancer risk and residential proximity to paper mills, pulp mills, petroleum refineries, steel mills, thermal power plants, alum smelters, nickel smelters, lead smelters, copper smelters, and zinc smelters was assessed.
We conducted a population-based case-control study of 2343 cases with breast cancer and 2467 controls using residential proximity at some time between 1960 and 5 years before the completion of questionnaire in Canada.
Adjusted odds ratios were statistically significantly increased for residing near steel mills (0.8 to 3.2 km) and thermal power plants (
PubMed ID
21494158 View in PubMed
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Bronchial responsiveness in bakery workers: relation to airway symptoms, IgE sensitization, nasal indices of inflammation, flour dust exposure and smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83708
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2007 Sep;27(5):327-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Storaas Torgeir
Irgens Agot
Florvaag Erik
Steinsvåg Sverre K
Ardal Laila
Do Thien Van
Greiff Lennart
Aasen Tor B
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. torgeir.storaas@helse-bergen.no
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2007 Sep;27(5):327-34
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstrictor Agents
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust
Eosinophils - immunology
Flour - adverse effects
Food-Processing Industry - statistics & numerical data
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Interviews
Methacholine Chloride
Middle Aged
Nasal Lavage Fluid - cytology - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Rhinitis - complications - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is common in bakery workers. The relation between bronchial responsiveness measured with a tidal breathing method and smoking, airway symptoms, IgE-sensitization, nasal indices of inflammation and flour dust exposure have been studied with bronchial responsiveness expressed as a continuous outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bakery workers (n = 197) were subjected to interviews, questionnaires, allergy tests, workplace dust measurements and bronchial metacholine provocation. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and alpha(2)-macroglobulin were measured in nasal lavage. Bronchial responsiveness was expressed as slope(conc), a measurement based on regressing the per cent reduction in FEV(1) at each provocation step. RESULTS: BHR expressed as slope(conc) was associated with smoking (P = 0.009), asthma symptoms at work (P = 0.001), and occupational IgE sensitization (P = 0.048). After adjusting for baseline lung function the association between BHR and IgE sensitization was no longer present. We demonstrated an association between nasal ECP and BHR (slope(conc)
PubMed ID
17697030 View in PubMed
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A cancer incidence and mortality study of Dow Chemical Canada Inc. manufacturing sites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172800
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2005 Dec;55(8):618-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Carol Burns
Ken Harrison
Brenda Jammer
Dores Zuccarini
Bryan Lafrance
Author Affiliation
The Dow Chemical Company-Epidemiology, 1803 Building, Midland, MI 48674, USA. cburns@dow.com
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2005 Dec;55(8):618-24
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestos - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Chemical Industry - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Abstract
Previously, the mortality was reported in a cohort of male workers at an Ontario chemical plant.
To expand the cohort and to investigate the mortality and cancer incidence risk among chemical manufacturing sites.
We followed 5277 men and 1301 women from 1950 to 1999.
Employees experienced lower mortality and cancer incidence rates than the general population for several major causes of death, including heart disease, respiratory cancer and many other cancers. There were no cases of angiosarcoma of the liver. We observed a lower mortality rate of prostate cancer [standardized mortality ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43-1.32], but a higher incidence rate of prostate cancer [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.48]. Among the Sarnia employees, the incidence of pleural neoplasms was increased (5 observed versus 1.48 expected, SIR = 3.37, 95% CI 1.09-7.86). These cancers were included in the 12 deaths with malignant mesothelioma at Sarnia.
Consistent with the earlier report, lower mortality rates were observed for the major classifications of disease and malignant neoplasms. The higher incidence rates of prostate cancer are not readily explainable but may reflect increased screening among current employees and recent retirees. Past asbestos exposure prior to 1980 is probably a contributor to the deaths due to malignant mesothelioma but is not reflected in lung cancer mortality. We find little indication of any other increased rates of mortality or cancer within the overall workforce of these chemical plants.
PubMed ID
16174663 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.