Skip header and navigation

Refine By

180 records – page 1 of 18.

[About flavouring substances and flavouring preparations regulation in the field of manufacturing of flavourings and foodstuffs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112655
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2013;82(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
O V Bagriantseva
G N Shatrov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2013;82(1):23-32
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Flavoring Agents - pharmacology - standards
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Food Safety
Humans
Russia
Abstract
In article are given substantiation for modification of contemporary list of biologically active substances with undesirable toxicological qualities (namely included in this list of menthofuran, methyleugenol (4-Allyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene), teucrin A, capsaicin, estragol1 (-Allyl-4-methoxybenzene) and excluded from the list of quinine, santonin, berberin) and developing the list of plants--natural sources of flavourings substances. The new criteria of European Union for including into the relevant for using in/on foodstuff list of flavouring substances, which was published in the Comission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 872/2012 concerning flavourings, listed the 11 flavouring substances for which have been established indexes of foodstuffs in manufacturing, which there are could using and criteria of their safety (caffeine, theobromine, neohesperidin dihydrocalcone, rebaudioside A, d-camphor, three quinine salts (FL 14.011, FL 14.152 and FL 14.155), glycyrrhizic acid and its ammoniated form, ammonium chloride, discussed the possibility of using R- and S-isomers of flavouring substances and L- and D-forms of aminoacids for preparing of flavours, are discussed. Improving of the system of safety using of flavourings in Russian Federation, harmonized with demands of European Union and FAQ/WHO, are, at first, connected with the necessity of reevaluation of the list flavouring substances, which could be use in/on foodstuff, developing of list of the plants--natural sources of flavourings substances and preparations and regulations of using flavourings preparations which can include biologically active substances.
PubMed ID
23808275 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academia and industry: lessons from the unfortunate events in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201078
Source
Lancet. 1999 Mar 6;353(9155):771-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-1999
Author
D G Nathan
D J Weatherall
Author Affiliation
Dana Farber Institute of Cancer Research, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Lancet. 1999 Mar 6;353(9155):771-2
Date
Mar-6-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Clinical Trials as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Industry - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Humans
Iron Chelating Agents - therapeutic use
Ontario
Pyridones - therapeutic use
Thalassemia - drug therapy
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 May 29;353(9167):188810359449
PubMed ID
10459956 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent snus use in Finland in 1981-2003: trend, total sales ban and acquisition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80534
Source
Tob Control. 2006 Oct;15(5):392-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Huhtala Heini S A
Rainio Susanna U
Rimpelä Arja H
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, 33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Heini.Huhtala@uta.fi
Source
Tob Control. 2006 Oct;15(5):392-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Tobacco Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco, Smokeless
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study changes in adolescent snus use from 1981 to 2003, the effects of the total snus sales ban (1995) and snus acquisition. DESIGN: Biennial postal surveys in 1981-2003. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Entire Finland; 12-, 14-, 16-, and 18-year-olds (n = 73,946; 3105-8390 per year). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Snus use (experimental, daily/occasionally), snus acquisition (2001, 2003). RESULTS: Snus experimentation grew in popularity before the total sales ban in 16- and 18-year-old boys and after the ban in all age and sex groups. A decrease was seen between 2001 and 2003, except for 18-year-old boys. Daily/occasional use mainly followed the same pattern in boys while in girls the daily/occasional use was rare and no significant changes were observed. In 2003, boys experimented with snus more often than girls (12-year-olds 1% v 0%, 14-year-olds 9% v 4%, 16-year-olds 30% v 12%, 18-year-olds 44% v 18%). Hardly any girls used snus daily/occasionally, but 1% of 14-year-old boys, 7% of 16-year-olds, and 9% of 18-year-olds did. Of daily/occasional users, 84% acquired snus from friends or acquaintances, 55% from tourist trips to neighbouring countries (Estonia, Sweden), and 7% through sport teams; 24% obtained it from under-the-counter sources. For experimenters, the corresponding figures were 79%, 18%, 0.3%, and 5%. CONCLUSIONS: The total sales ban did not stop snus use; instead, the increase continued after the ban. Friends who travel to neighbouring countries act as go-betweens reselling snus. Snus is used even by the youngest adolescents, thus contributing to the nicotine dependence process.
PubMed ID
16998174 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ads pressure Ontario to butt out in retail locations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174401
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Jun 7;172(12):1544
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-2005
Source
Can Nurse. 1996 Sep;92(8):60, 59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996

Analysis of factors related to illegal tobacco sales to young people in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200001
Source
Tob Control. 1999;8(3):301-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
B. O'Grady
M. Asbridge
T. Abernathy
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Tob Control. 1999;8(3):301-5
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Plants, Toxic
Prevalence
Random Allocation
Tobacco
Tobacco Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology
Abstract
To identify and to discuss factors influencing illegal merchant sales of tobacco to underage people in Ontario, Canada.
Results were obtained through random retail compliance checks of tobacco merchants. A multivariate analysis specified the relationship between selected independent variables and the willingness of tobacco merchants to sell to minors. The selected independent variables included retail operation type, community population size, the presence of tobacco production, signage, sex and age of volunteers, smoking prevalence rates, and enforcement rates.
A random, stratified sample of 438 tobacco retailers in 186 communities in Ontario.
Willingness of merchants to sell tobacco to minors.
Older youths and girls were more likely to be sold tobacco products. Purchase attempts carried out in tobacco-producing regions were also statistically related to illegal sales.
Policy efforts to control youth access to tobacco in Canada may need to invoke legislation requiring merchants to request proper identification from customers who appear to be under the age of 25, and who seek to purchase tobacco products. Further attention could also be directed at tobacco control policies and enforcement strategies that need to consider the unique challenges faced by jurisdictions where the tobacco industry is a powerful presence.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Oct 9;337(15):1044-519321533
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Jun 26;257(24):3387-93586269
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Jan 6;261(1):80-32908999
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Jul;81(7):891-32053666
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Dec 11;266(22):3159-611956104
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Dec 11;266(22):3168-711956106
Cites: Prev Med. 1992 May;21(3):320-81614994
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Feb;83(2):227-328427328
Cites: N C Med J. 1995 Jan;56(1):59-637862209
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 1995 Jan-Feb;9(3):172-410150719
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Feb;86(2):221-48633739
Cites: Tob Control. 1996 Spring;5(1):46-518795859
PubMed ID
10599575 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between tobacco vendor non-compliance with youth access and point of sale restrictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146713
Source
Tob Control. 2010 Apr;19(2):171
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010

Bill S-11-Safe Food for Canadians Act.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119490
Source
Health Law Can. 2012 Aug;33(1):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Lewis Retik
Author Affiliation
Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP, Ottawa.
Source
Health Law Can. 2012 Aug;33(1):4-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Safety
Humans
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
23097925 View in PubMed
Less detail

180 records – page 1 of 18.