Skip header and navigation

Refine By

174 records – page 1 of 18.

Access by air: Mission Air provides vital link.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222916
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1992 Nov-Dec;1(6):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Barr
Author Affiliation
Mission Air Transportation Network, Toronto.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1992 Nov-Dec;1(6):22-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft - economics
Canada
Fund Raising - methods
Humans
Industry - economics
Interinstitutional Relations
Organizational Objectives
Transportation of Patients - economics - methods
Travel
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration
Abstract
Every year thousands of Canadians must travel far from home to receive specialized medical treatment or diagnosis. For many individuals, funds for air travel are limited. The Mission Air Network removes some of this stress by arranging free flights for patients and family members or escorts, using seats donated by commercial, corporate and government sponsors.
PubMed ID
10123350 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Administrative organization and responsibility].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185287
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Apr 14;165(16):1641-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2003
Author
Jannik C Hilsted
Kim Krogsgaard
Author Affiliation
Hospitalsdirektionen, H:S Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 København ø.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Apr 14;165(16):1641-2
Date
Apr-14-2003
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Trials as Topic - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Denmark
Drug Industry - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Ethics Committees, Clinical
Hospital Administration
Humans
Physician's Role
Abstract
The paper describes the current organisation of clinical trials in Danish hospitals, with particular emphasis on the relationship between hospitals and the pharmaceutical industry. Legal responsibilities as well as mutual agreements on collaboration and organisation are described and discussed.
PubMed ID
12756816 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ageism, age relations, and garment industry work in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195607
Source
Gerontologist. 2001 Feb;41(1):111-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J A McMullin
V W Marshall
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. mcmullin@julian.uwo.ca
Source
Gerontologist. 2001 Feb;41(1):111-22
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Industry - economics - manpower
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel Management
Prejudice
Quebec
Retirement
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Sex Factors
Stereotyping
Abstract
This study examined the complexities of age relations at work. Garment workers believed that their fate was linked to ageism and that their work experience was discounted by management. Managers wanted to be rid of older workers because they commanded higher wages than younger workers. The issue was cost reduction, and age was implicated unintendedly. Still, managers seemed to use stereotypical images to discourage older workers and they did not organize work routines to facilitate the adaptation of them. Instead, they subcontracted the easy jobs, relying on the experience of the older employees for difficult work while not adapting the workplace. Theoretically, the authors argue that ageism and age discrimination can best be understood through a recognition of the importance of structured age relations and human agency.
PubMed ID
11220808 View in PubMed
Less detail

An analysis of the clinical development of drugs in Norway for the year 2000: the completion of research and publication of results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153525
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Mar;65(3):315-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Ola P Hole
Sigurd Nitter-Hauge
Henrik R Cederkvist
Finn O Winther
Author Affiliation
Faculty Division Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo, 0027 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Mar;65(3):315-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - economics - statistics & numerical data
Biomedical Research - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Trials as Topic - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Industry - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Ethics Committees, Research - ethics - standards
Hospitals, Private - economics - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Public - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Dissemination - ethics
Norway
Publishing - ethics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Design - standards - statistics & numerical data
Research Support as Topic - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
In Norway, very little data are available on the relation between the total number of research projects on the clinical development of drugs that have been started, the number of these projects in which the research phase has been completed and the number of projects for which results have been published. The aim of this study was to determine the number of projects in which the research phase had been completed and the results published.
Information on research projects carried out on the clinical development of drugs during the year 2000 was obtained from the archives of the Norwegian Research Ethical Committee (REC) and subsequently analysed.
The final analysis revealed that 245 research projects on the clinical development of drugs had been started in 2000. Of these, 178 (73%) completed the research phase as planned. The results of 131 (54%) of these projects were published in a scientific journal, and another 34 (14%) were reported as a congress abstract or as report to a sponsor; 80 (33%) were not published at all. Industrial sponsors seemed to promote both the completion of the research process and the publication of results in scientific journals.
PubMed ID
19104790 View in PubMed
Less detail

An analysis of the clinical development of drugs in Norway for the years 2000 and 2004: the influence of the pharmaceutical industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162102
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Oct;63(10):909-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Finn O Winther
Ola P Hole
Sigurd Nitter-Hauge
Author Affiliation
Faculty Division Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo, 0027, Oslo, Norway. finnow@ulrik.uio.no
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Oct;63(10):909-12
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - economics - statistics & numerical data
Bias (epidemiology)
Biomedical Research - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Trials as Topic - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Conflict of Interest
Drug Industry - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Private - economics - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Public - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support as Topic - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
Little has been published either concerning the total number of research projects in connection with clinical development of drugs or the number of projects financially supported by the industry.
From the archives of the five regional Norwegian Research Ethical Committees (REC), all research projects in connection with clinical development of drugs for the years 2000 and 2004 were analysed with the intention of finding the number of projects financially supported by the industry, the type of research institution, the industrial company, the topic of the research as classified in the international Anatomic Therapeutic Classification system (ATC), the research phase and the approval status of the drug by the Norwegian Medicines Agency (NMA).
The total number of research projects for the clinical development of drugs for the years 2000 and 2004 was 489, and 75.7% were financially supported by the industry. More than two-thirds of the projects were done in academic institutions and about one-third were equally divided between public health hospitals and private health service/hospitals. Eight of the 88 drug companies involved were among the world's largest and supported 38% of the projects. Fifty-nine percent of all the projects were within four therapeutic groups: antineoplastic/immunomodulating agents, nervous system, cardiovascular system and alimentary tract/metabolism. The distribution of research phases was as follows: phase I 1.2%, phase II 16.4%, phase III 26.6% and phase IV 55.8%. In the phase IV drug trials, drugs had been approved for sale by the NMA.
The share of research projects related to the development of drugs supported by the industry is high. Research independent of the industry is of importance to avoid bias and selective publications and to prevent research as a means of marketing. Independent research should be encouraged and financially supported by sources with no connection to the drug industry.
PubMed ID
17673994 View in PubMed
Less detail

An economic evaluation of a participatory ergonomics process in an auto parts manufacturer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152071
Source
J Safety Res. 2009;40(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Emile Tompa
Roman Dolinschi
Andrew Laing
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, 481 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. etompa@iwh.on.ca
Source
J Safety Res. 2009;40(1):41-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - economics - prevention & control
Automobiles
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Human Engineering - economics - methods
Humans
Industry - economics
Insurance, Disability - economics
Ontario
Abstract
We assess the costs and consequences of a participatory ergonomics process at a Canadian car parts manufacturer from the perspective of the firm.
Regression modeling was used with interrupted time series data to assess the impact of the process on several health measures. Consequences were kept in natural units for cost-effectiveness analysis, and translated into monetary units for cost-benefit analysis.
The duration of disability insurance claims and the number of denied workers' compensation claims was significantly reduced. The cost-effectiveness ratio is $12.06 per disability day averted. The net present value is $244,416 for a 23-month period with a benefit-to-cost ratio of 10.6, suggesting that the process was worth undertaking (monetary units in 2001 Canadian dollars).
Our findings emphasize the importance of considering a range of outcomes when evaluating an occupational health and safety intervention.
Participatory ergonomics process can be cost-effective for a firm.
PubMed ID
19285585 View in PubMed
Less detail

174 records – page 1 of 18.