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Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute respiratory symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects living near a coal-fired plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240980
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Pershagen
Z. Hrubec
U. Lorich
P. Rönnqvist
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):27-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Coal - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - analysis
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Daily symptom rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects with presumed high sensitivity to air pollution who lived near a coal-fired plant were compared with 24-hr ambient air concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, soot, and suspended particles as well as with emissions from the plant. The mean concentrations of each of the pollutants during the 4-month study period were below 30 micrograms/m3, and no single 24-hr concentration exceeded 100 micrograms/m3. There were no consistent associations between plant emissions and pollutant levels or between these two variables and daily symptom rates. The results indicate that the coal-fired plant was not of major importance for the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms in the surrounding population.
PubMed ID
6712282 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adaptive response of blood lymphocytes as a marker of hemopoiesis status in exposed persons].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126505
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Nov-Dec;51(6):645-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Akleev
A V Aleshchenko
O V Kudriashova
L P Semenova
A M Serebrianyi
O I Khudiakova
I I Pelevina
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Nov-Dec;51(6):645-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Aged
Bone Marrow Cells - radiation effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Hematopoiesis - radiation effects
Hematopoietic Stem Cells - radiation effects
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocytes - cytology - physiology - radiation effects
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation, Ionizing
Rivers
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Water Pollution, Radioactive - adverse effects
Abstract
An obvious correlation between the type of reaction manifested by peripheral blood lymphocytes to low dose irradiation in vitro (adaptive potential), the RBM cell composition (during the period of the major exposure), and the peripheral blood cell composition (at a late time period coincident with the studies of induced radioresistance) has been found in the Techa riverside residents in the later periods after the onset of a long-term low-dose rate radiation exposure (55-60 years later) within a range of individual red bone marrow doses from 0.01 to 1.79 Gy. The nature of these dependences observed in chronically exposed individuals differs from that revealed in the controls. It can be suggested based on the results of the study that the capacity for the adaptive response shown by peripheral blood lymphocytes donated by exposed persons in the remote period after exposure can be regarded as a biological marker of the functional state of the hemopoietic stem cell pool.
PubMed ID
22384713 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A decrease in the motor activity of children under the influence of technogenic air pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201982
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 Mar-Apr;(2):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S L Ust'iantsev
V G Kulikov
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 Mar-Apr;(2):26-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Growth
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Male
Motor Activity
Russia
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Among multiple and various functions of the body, motor activity is essential. But it is little studied in schoolchildren. The present study was undertaken to investigate the impact of industrial pollution of the ambient air on the motor activity in old schoolchildren. At school, the motor activity of 8th-, 10th-, and 11th-form schoolchildren was found to decrease with age, the dynamics of its decrease was determined by not only sexual differences of pupils, but also by the technogenic ambient air pollutions.
PubMed ID
10349234 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ambient air pollution and human health in the town of Nizhnekamsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188786
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 May-Jun;(3):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
F F Dautov
R F Khakimova
N G Gabitov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 May-Jun;(3):12-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Chemical Industry
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Water - analysis
Abstract
The paper gives hygienic characteristics of ambient air pollution and examines human health in the town of Nizhnekamsk. There are worse demographic indices. In the structure of morbidity, respiratory diseases make up the largest proportion (44.4%), injuries and poisoning rank next (16.9%), skin and skin fate occupy the third place (5.4%). There are the highest morbidity rates in the polluted areas of the town. In these areas, respiratory allergoses (preasthma and bronchial asthma) occur more frequently than in the controls.
PubMed ID
12198892 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of morbidity in vicinity of a tungsten-molybdenum industrial complex].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161624
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Jul-Aug;(4):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
N V Reutova
T i Vorob'eva
T V Reutova
A M Tumova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Jul-Aug;(4):13-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Illness - etiology - mortality
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Industry
Molybdenum - adverse effects
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Tungsten Compounds - adverse effects
Abstract
Morbidity rates were analyzed in adults residing in vicinity of a tungsten-molybdenum industrial complex. The structure of morbidity was examined in relation to the physiological role of a number of heavy metals that are the priority contaminants in this area and with the habits of the residential population. The incidence of diseases of the musculoskeletal system, connective tissue, and respiratory organs was significantly higher in the area adjacent to the complex. In the mid-highlands, there are low incidence rates of circulatory, digestive, and urogenital diseases, and neoplasms as compared with the republican rates.
PubMed ID
17729444 View in PubMed
Less detail

An ecological study of industry in a high-risk region of multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130644
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2011 Dec 15;311(1-2):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
Inger Boström
Anne-Marie Landtblom
Klaus Lauer
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Clincal and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience, Linköping, University, Linköping, Sweden. inger.bostrom@kristinehamn.se
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2011 Dec 15;311(1-2):50-7
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The county of Värmland, Sweden, has shown a high frequency of multiple sclerosis in several investigations. It has been presented in three studies; a period prevalence study in 1925-1934, a mortality study during 1952-1992 and a prevalence investigation in 2002. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of industry in this high-risk area for multiple sclerosis. The three investigations were correlated with industry in 1913 and in the 1950s, all analyzed by the Kruskall-Wallis test. Select industries from wood-pulp, paper and iron/mechanical sectors were tested also in whole Sweden. The Spearman rank correlation was used for these data and forestry data in Värmland. In Värmland, industrial data from 1913 revealed that large sawmills were associated with the period prevalence in 1925-1934 and there was a possible correlation with the prevalence for 2002. Wood-pulp factories showed a possible association with the prevalence 1925-1934 and the mortality 1952-1992. Some industries in the 1950s were correlated with the prevalence 2002. Wood and paper industries in Sweden 1913 showed an association with the MS mortality 1952-1992. In summary, data on MS prevalence in Värmland and mortality both in Värmland and all Sweden from the past 100 years suggest an association with wood-related industries in 1913 and in the 1950s, whereas no consistent association was found for other industries.
PubMed ID
21982618 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Approaches to the evaluation of effects caused by industrial pollution on children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200521
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1999;(9):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
L A Shchepliagina
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1999;(9):27-30
Date
1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Russia
Abstract
The article deals with results of up-to-date approach to evaluation of xenobiotics' quantitative contribution into development of common pediatric problems. Using multivariate statistics, the authors calculated attributive and relative risks of health disorders in children. Analysis of clinical, epidemiologic and statistic data helped to identify some pathogenetic features of ecologically induced disorders in children.
PubMed ID
10526478 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are pharmaceuticals potent environmental pollutants? Part I: environmental risk assessments of selected active pharmaceutical ingredients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83136
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Jul 1;364(1-3):67-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2006
Author
Carlsson Carina
Johansson Anna-Karin
Alvan Gunnar
Bergman Kerstin
Kühler Thomas
Author Affiliation
Swedish Medical Products Agency, PO Box 26, SE-751 03 Uppsala, Sweden. carina.carlsson@mpa.se
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Jul 1;364(1-3):67-87
Date
Jul-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Industry
Ecosystem
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - legislation & jurisprudence
Environmental Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects - analysis
Public Health
Risk assessment
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
As part of achieving national environmental goals, the Swedish Government commissioned an official report from the Swedish Medical Products Agency on environmental effects of pharmaceuticals. Considering half-lives/biodegradability, environmental occurrence, and Swedish sales statistics, 27 active pharmaceutical ingredients were selected for environmental hazard and risk assessments. Although there were large data gaps for many of the compounds, nine ingredients were identified as dangerous for the aquatic environment. Only the sex hormones oestradiol and ethinyloestradiol were considered to be associated with possible aquatic environmental risks. We conclude that risk for acute toxic effects in the environment with the current use of active pharmaceutical ingredients is unlikely. Chronic environmental toxic effects, however, cannot be excluded due to lack of chronic ecotoxicity data. Measures to reduce potential environmental impact posed by pharmaceutical products must be based on knowledge on chronic ecotoxic effects of both active pharmaceutical ingredients as well as excipients. We believe that the impact pharmaceuticals have on the environment should be further studied and be given greater attention such that informed assessments of hazards as well as risks can be done.
PubMed ID
16257037 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.