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232 records – page 1 of 24.

Adolescent personality development: three phases, three courses and varying turmoil. Findings from the Toronto Adolescent Longitudinal Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230392
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):500-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
H. Golombek
P. Marton
B A Stein
M. Korenblum
Author Affiliation
Wellesley Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):500-4
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Individuation
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Object Attachment
Ontario
Personality Assessment
Personality Development
Personality Disorders - psychology
Psychosexual Development
Self Concept
Abstract
The Toronto Adolescent Longitudinal Study was launched in 1977 to examine personality development in a non-clinical sample of children from ages ten through 19 over an eight year period. Following a description of their conceptualized model of personality and of the nature of the study, the authors summarize their findings which suggest new perspectives in three areas of adolescent personality development: 1) the subphases of adolescence, 2) the routes of passage through which adolescents proceed, and 3) adolescent turmoil.
PubMed ID
2766202 View in PubMed
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Aging, work, life-style and work ability among Finnish municipal workers in 1981-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210013
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K. Tuomi
J. Ilmarinen
R. Martikainen
L. Aalto
M. Klockars
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:58-65
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Individuality
Job Satisfaction
Life Style
Local Government
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness - psychology
Social Environment
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workload - psychology
Abstract
This study was designed to explain changes in work ability through occupational and life-style factors.
Work ability was measured by an index describing workers' health resources in regard to their work demands. The work factors mainly included physical and mental demands, social organization and the physical work environment. The life-style factors covered smoking, alcohol consumption, and leisure-time physical exercise. The first questionnaire study was done in 1981 and it was repeated in 1992. The subjects (N = 818) were workers in the 44- to 51-year-old age group in the beginning of the study who were active during the entire follow-up. The improvement and, correspondingly, the decline in work ability were analyzed by logistic regression models.
Both the improvement and the decline in work ability were associated more strongly with changes in work and life-style during the follow-up than with their initial variation. The model for improved work ability included improvement of the supervisor's attitude, decreased repetitive movements at work, and increased amount of vigorous leisure-time physical exercise. Deterioration in work ability was explained by a model which included a decrease in recognition and esteem at work, decrease in workroom conditions, increase in standing at work, and decrease in vigorous leisure-time physical exercise.
Social relations at work can promote or impair the work ability of elderly workers. Although the work ability of elderly workers generally declined with aging, both older and younger workers were also able to improve their work ability.
PubMed ID
9247996 View in PubMed
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Anencephalic infants as organ sources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225572
Source
Bioethics. 1991 Oct;5(4):326-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
James W Walters
Source
Bioethics. 1991 Oct;5(4):326-41
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anencephaly
Attitude
Brain Death
Canada
Data Collection
Death
Ethicists
Ethics
Hospitals
Humans
Hypothermia
Individuality
Infant, Newborn
Jurisprudence
Life Support Care
Organizational Policy
Personhood
Physicians
Public Policy
Reference Standards
Social Change
Societies
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement
United States
Value of Life
Wedge Argument
Abstract
Liveborn anencephalic infants cannot be used legally as sources for vital organs in the United States and Canada. Understandably, knowledgeable physicians and bioethicists are divided over the ethics of such use and hold various views on whether the legal status of anencephalic newborns should ever be changed. Even if anencephalic newborns could be utilized as organ sources, at best a few hundred infants needing transplant organs would be saved each year. Primarily, this is because the number of anencephalic newborns is likely to diminish due to prenatal diagnosis resulting in abortions. However, the case of anencephalic infants and their treatment is paradigmatic in raising questions far beyond mere organ transplantation.... This analytical report is given against the backdrop of a burgeoning medical technology which can sustain human life far beyond that generally regarded as a meaningful, functional life. The report has three sections: first, a description of the approaches to the use of anencephalic infants in North America over the last five years; second, a summary of the results of a survey of informed clinicians and ethicists; and third, an indication of the leading ethical issues raised by human individuals at the border of life.
PubMed ID
11653953 View in PubMed
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Anxiety trajectories in the second half of life: Genetic and environmental contributions over age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278402
Source
Psychol Aging. 2016 Feb;31(1):101-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Lewina O Lee
Margaret Gatz
Nancy L Pedersen
Carol A Prescott
Source
Psychol Aging. 2016 Feb;31(1):101-13
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - genetics - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Biometry
Cohort Studies
Death
Environment
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Individuality
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Twin Studies as Topic
Twins - genetics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Clinically significant anxiety symptoms are prevalent among the elderly, yet knowledge about the longitudinal course of anxiety symptoms in later life remains scarce. The goals of this study were to (a) characterize age trajectories of state anxiety symptoms in the second half of life, and (b) estimate genetic and environmental contributions to individual differences in the age trajectory of state anxiety. This study was based on data from 1,482 participants in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging who were aged 50 and older at their first occasion (512 complete twin pairs, 458 singletons) and had up to 6 measurement occasions spanning 11 years. Consistent with life span developmental theories of age-related emotional change, anxiety symptom levels declined during the transition from midlife to the mid-60s, followed by a mild increase that gradually plateaued in the 80s. There were substantial individual differences in the age trajectory of anxiety. After accounting for effects of sex, cohort, mode of testing, and proximity to death, this longitudinal variation was partitioned into biometric sources. Nonshared environmental variance was highest in the late 60s and declined thereafter, whereas genetic variance increased at an accelerated pace from approximately age 60 onward. There was no evidence for effects of rearing or other shared environment on anxiety symptoms in later life. These findings highlight how the etiology of anxiety symptoms changes from midlife to old age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26751006 View in PubMed
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232 records – page 1 of 24.