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Acute mastoiditis in Greenland between 1994-2007

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96607
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1335
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Homøe, P
Jensen, RG
Brofeldt, S
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark. phom@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1335
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute mastoiditis
Acute otitis media (AOM)
Antibiotics
Arctic
Auricle
Bacteriological examination
Childhood
Chronic otitis media
Facial nerve paralysis
Indigenous populations
National Greenland Inpatient Register
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The indigenous populations of the Arctic are prone to middle ear infections starting with an early age first episode, followed by frequent episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) during childhood. A high proportion develop chronic otitis media. Acute mastoiditis is a serious complication of AOM in childhood with postauricular swelling, erythema, and tenderness, protrusion of the auricle, high fever and general malaise. The disease may protrude intracranially. The incidence rates for acute mastoiditis in the Western world range from 1.2 to 4.2 cases/100 000 per year. There exists no epidemiological data on acute mastoiditis in the Arctic region. METHODS: A retrospective search was made for the WHO ICD-10 code DH70.0 (denoting acute mastoiditis) using the National Greenland Inpatient Register for the period 1994-2007, inclusive. Fifteen patients were registered and their medical records were retrieved. Four patients were obviously misclassified, leaving 11 patients for evaluation. The medical records were available for 10 patients. The diagnostic inclusion criterion was written clinical signs of acute mastoiditis. RESULTS: Based on the case series the incidence rate was calculated to be 1.4 for the total Greenlandic population and 7.4 for children 0 and 10 years of age. Median age was 14 months (5-105 months) and eight were female (72%). Seven of the 10 were exclusively treated with antibiotics and three underwent additional ear surgery. Bacteriological examination was performed in five of 10. One 8 month-old girl presented with a contemporary facial nerve paralysis and was treated with intravenous antibiotics; one 8 year-old girl was evacuated to Copenhagen for urgent surgery due to signs of meningitis. Acute CT scan showed a cerebellar abscess and a thrombosis in the lateral sigmoid sinus vein. An extensive cholesteatoma was found and eradicated during surgery. Six weeks later the patient returned home with a maximal conductive hearing loss as the only complication. All patients recovered from the disease. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute mastoiditis in Greenland is comparable to the incidence elsewhere, although AOM occurs more frequently among small children in the Greenlandic population. The disease is serious and must be treated immediately with intravenous antibiotics, followed by urgent surgery if there is no improvement.
PubMed ID
20568909 View in PubMed
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The Arctic: the new business hotspot or a sustainable prosperity project of co-management?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297053
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 16 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
indigenous populations of the region sustain a livelihood (van Voorst, 2009). Local animal and plant species are of dietary importance, while hunting, fishing or foraging are all of cultural and social value. The availability of many species that the Arctic indigenous people rely on for food has become
  1 document  
Author
Arruda, Gisele
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 16 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
510521
Keywords
Climate change
Economic development
Indigenous populations
Resource development
Abstract
The Arctic plays a key role in the global climate. As the ice retreats the current challenges concerning the environment, maritime safety, tourism and oil and gas activity will intensify even more the effects of climate change on Arctic ecosystems and communities. Climate change and modernization have thus become two intrinsically linked forces that severely alter the context in which the indigenous populations of the region sustain a livelihood (van Voorst, 2009). Local animal and plant species are of dietary importance, while hunting, fishing or foraging are all of cultural and social value. The availability of many species that the Arctic indigenous people rely on for food has become limited due to climate change and the receding ice cover. The assessment of potential impacts of resource development should to some extent rely on traditional knowledge and could benefit climate change researchers in Western academia and policy-making circles as well as help the indigenous communities to tackle the difficult task of promoting their local adaptation. A joint assessment and management on impacts issues must be performed based on mutual consent, information exchange, responsible coordination and cooperation. Social impact assessment (SIAs) serve as means of determining how and to what extent specialized social groups will become better or worse off as a result of certain externally generated actions. Assessments have been largely about indigenous people, not by them (Cochran et al, 2013:558). This is why it becomes crucial to enrich SIAs with detail and context that focus on the indigenous perspective, in which economy and culture are more closely intertwined. The benefits of the Arctic emerging economy may be seen in the creation of economic development, but it must be part of a sustainable prosperity project of comanagement with triple gain to economy, environment and communities.
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ASC-Paper_Arruda_Gisele.pdf

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Body proportions in healthy adult Inuit in East Greenland in 1963

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6645
Source
Pages 73-76 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, S
Mulvad, G
Pedersen, HS
Laurberg, P
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland. stiga@dadlnet.dk
Source
Pages 73-76 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
BMI
Body build
Body mass index
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Indigenous population
Inuit
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: It is important to know the starting point when describing changes in Inuit in transition. STUDY DESIGN: The original charts of 1,852 individuals from the epidemiological investigation in East Greenland around 1963 performed by Littauer and colleagues were recovered recently. They included height, weight and a physical investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: The focus of this paper was adult Inuit body proportions in 1963 by ten-year age groups excluding participants with disabilities affecting body build. Relatively stable values were seen in both genders with age. Median values in men/women aged 20 years and above were: height 164/153.5 cm, weight 64/54 kg and BMI 23.7/23.1. Men aged 50 years and above had a little lower height and weight than young men. Women aged 40-49 years had a higher weight and BMI, but this evened out in the older age groups. Median BMI was relatively high compared to WHO definition. CONCLUSIONS: The data from 1963 gives a starting point for evaluating changes in Inuit body build and the prevalence of overweight. Furthermore, they indicate a need for Inuit-specific normal BMI delineation.
PubMed ID
15736625 View in PubMed
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Comparative data concerning morbidity of the indigenous and newly come populations of the Khanty-Mansy National Area

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85259
Source
Page 22 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
of acute pneumonia has been the highest in tmrn- schildren. Chronic pneumonia is also the most frequent case with them. Among the. adults chronic pneumonia is the least frequent in the indigenous population (1,53.!'o,5 per 1000}; the lll8XilJlUDI has been registered in towns. Gastri.c ulcer is
  1 document  
Author
V. Ye. Yaroslavsky, V.G. Bychkov
Author Affiliation
Tyumen, USSR
Source
Page 22 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Date
1978
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
morbidity indigenous population Khanty-Mansy National area
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Effects of client and therapist ethnicity and ethnic matching: a study of outpatient mental health treatment in indigenous and majority populations in Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286439
Source
Pages 456-460 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
-up was included, the difference between the matched and the mismatched group was significant for GSI scores, within the moderate treatm ent duration MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS @$ffiliji!.i DISCUSSION Many Indigenous populations in Western coun- tries have reduced access to mental health
  1 document  
Author
Snefrid Mollersen
Harold C Sexton
Arne Holte
Author Affiliation
Sami National Centre for Mental Health, Lakselv, Norway
Department of Clinical Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway
Norwegian Institute of Public Health and Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Source
Pages 456-460 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Ethnicity
Ethnic match
Indigenous population
Outpatient mental health treatment
Abstract
Objectives: We explored the effects of ethnicity on mental health treatment in the Indigenous Sami and non-Sami Norwegian population of northern Norway. We examined the variations in client or therapist ethnicity or client-therapist ethnic matching on the delivery of treatment and in treatment outcome or improvement. Method: Client (n=335) and therapist (n=33) demographics and ethnicity were recorded prior to intake. Self-reported psychosocial distress was recorded at intake, termination and at a 20-month follow-up. Therapists reported their clinical assessments at intake and discharge. The association between the ethnic variables, treatment delivery and clinical status were examined with regression analyses and analyses of variance. We used linear growth curves to explore ethnic variation in change in improvement over time. Results: The results showed that the delivery of treatment and improvement did not differ significantly by client ethnicity. Therapist ethnicity was associated with the amount and type of service provided. Ethnic matching was associated with greater symptomatic improvement in treatments of moderate duration. Conclusions: This study was conducted in the small multi-ethnic communities in northern Norway with a moderate sample size. The use of a categorical ethnic classification, global measures for description of clinical status and global categorization of the interventions may have served to veil the complexity of the interaction between ethnicity and treatment. Yet, within these limitations, the finding s indicate that ethnic matching positively impacted outcome and the ethnic background of the therapists seemed to influence their choice of treatment.
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Ethnic and environmental factors in health formation in the Siberian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84173
Source
Pages 14-15 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):14-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
disease development. In total, we revealed that the pathology formed in Native and strange populations, in children and adults, depended on ecological conditions and ethnicity. Key words: non-indigenous population, indigenous population, phospholipids, erythrocytes membrane, iododeficiency diseases
  1 document  
Author
Manchuk, V.T.
Author Affiliation
State Medical Research Institute for Northern Problems, SB RAMS, Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Source
Pages 14-15 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):14-15
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Erythrocyte membrane
Indigenous population
Iododeficency diseases
Metabolic blood reactions
Non-indigenous population
Phospholipids
Abstract
Today, the Russian North and Siberia has become a region with a great number of ecological and social problems with negative influences on the health state of their population, especially of the children. We made the evaluation of the health state of children aged less than three years using the cell-molecular parameters of the erythrocytes membrane. We revealed the peculiarities of the structural and functional characteristics of the cell membrane, especially in membranous structural phospholipids. We estimated the resistance of the membrane structure to damaging influences and revealed that regulator systems on the level of cell membrane had become in 65% of children--with Northerners less stable against loading states. We studied iododeficiency diseases in the Basin of the Enysei River and found a region of heavy iododeficiency in the Tuva Republic. We revealed the most distinctive signs of metabolic reactions in the blood of non-indigenous children. We studied ethnic peculiarities of disease development. In total, we revealed that the pathology formed in Native and strange populations, in children and adults, depended on ecological conditions and ethnicity.
PubMed ID
17929600 View in PubMed
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Ethnographic summary: The Chukotka region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102057
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II1.D. Social Organization 32 III.D.l. Marriage, Family, and Demographic Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 IV . Traditional Subsistence and Economy of the Indigenous Populations of Southeastern Chukotka
  1 document  
Author
Pika, AI
Terentyeva, LP
Bogoyavlensky, DD
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute, Anchorage, AK
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 4
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Christianity
Chukchis
Chukotka
Economy
Eskimos
Ethnography
Ethnohistory
Fur breeding
Geography
Health care
Hunting
Indigenous populations
Kinship
Marriage
Reindeer breeding
Sea mammal harvest
Social organization
Subsistence
Traditional culture
Whaling
Abstract
The Providenski district (covering 26.8 thousand square kilometers) occupies the southeastern portion of the Chukotski Peninsula. The southeastern coast of the district is surrounded by the Bering Sea, while the northeast boundary borders the Chukotka district and the western edge neighbors the Yiultinsky district. Prior to 1957, the Providenski district was incorporated into the Chukotka district.
Notes
The entire collection of working papers from the Social Transition in the North project is available at UAA Archives & Special Collections in the Consortium Library.
Documents

STN_Vol 1_No 4_Ethnographic Summary_Chukotka Region_May 1993.pdf

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Ethnographic summary: The Kamchatka region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102058
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
. Social and Demographic Transformations in Kamchatka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I.A. Geographical Background 1 I.B. Ethnic History of Kamchatka Indigenous Populations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 I.C. The
  1 document  
Author
Mourashko, OA
Pika, AI
Bogoyavlenski, DD
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute, Anchorage, AK
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 5
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Bering Sea
Communication
Demographic behavior
Economy
Ethnic composition
Evens
Fish harvests
Indigenous populations
Itelmens
Kamchadals
Kamchatka Peninsula
Mortality
Orthodox Church
Reindeer
Settlement
Shamanism
Social structure
Subsistence
Traditional use
Abstract
The Kamchatka Administrative Region is made up of the Tigilsky, Karaginsky, and Bystrinsky districts. These districts share common boundaries, which extend from latitude 55°45' to 60°45'north to longitude 153°45' to 165° east. Together, they cover 108,300 square kilometers, with the Tigilsky District spreading out over 68,200 square kilometers, the Karaginsky District spanning 29,500 square kilometers, and the Bystrinsky District occupying 20,600 square kilometers. From south to north, the boundaries between the districts are divided by the Sredinny Mountain Ridge. This ridge descends towards the isthmus of the Kamchatka Peninsula and becomes a watershed (made by rivers flowing into the Okhotsky and Bering seas). Between the Tigilsky and Bystrinsky districts, there is the Ichinsky volcano (3,621 meters), which is extinct. To the west of the Sredinny Ridge lies the West Kamchatka Lowland. This lowland makes up a major part of the Tigilsky District; but because it is so badly bogged it keeps the development of land traffic and communications in the Tigilsky District greatly hindered. It is only in the coastal area that there are still old pathways linking separate villages, and trails which lead up to the passes over the Sredinny Ridge. The northern part of the Tigilsky District and the entire Karaginsky District are located in the southern edge of the Eternal Congelation Zone. Located in this zone are the villages of Tigil, Sedanka, Elovka, and Uka. Farther north, in the narrowest part of the neck where the valleys of the Anapka and Pustaya rivers meet, is Parapolsky Dol.the southern edge of the Eternal Congelation Zone. Located in this zone are the villages of Tigil, Sedanka, Elovka, and Uka. Fuirther north, in the narrowest part of the neck where the valleys of the Anapka and Pustay rivers meet, is Parapoolsky Dol.
Notes
The entire collection of working papers from the Social Transition in the North project is available at UAA Archives & Special Collections in the Consortium Library.
Documents

STN_Vol 1_No 5_Ethnographic Summary_Kamchatka Region_Aug 1993.pdf

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Health transitions in Arctic populations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100814
Source
Toronto, Ont.: University of Toronto Press; 485 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2008
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark
Source
Toronto, Ont.: University of Toronto Press; 485 pp.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Russia
Finland
Greenland
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic peoples
Circumpolar peoples
Economic changes
Environmental changes
Health determinants and outcomes
Health status
Indigenous populations
Political changes
Social changes
Abstract
The Arctic regions are inhabited by diverse populations, both indigenous and non-indigenous. 'Health Transitions in Arctic Populations' describes and explains changing health patterns in these areas, how particular patterns came about, and what can be done to improve the health of Arctic peoples. This collaborative study correlates changes in health status with major environmental, social, economic, and political changes in the Arctic. Together the contributors explore commonalities in the experiences of different peoples while recognizing their considerable diversity. The volume focuses on five Arctic regions--Greenland, Northern Canada, Alaska, Arctic Russia, and Northern Fennoscandia. A general overview of the geography, history, economy, population characteristics, health status, and health services of each region is provided and followed by discussion of specific indigenous populations, major health determinants and outcomes, and, finally, an integrative examination of what can be done to improve the health of circumpolar peoples. 'Health Transitions in Arctic Populations' offers both a detailed examination of key health issues in the North and a vision for the future well-being of Arctic inhabitants.
Notes
Available at UAA/APU Consortium Library: WA100.H43 2008; and at ARLIS: RC957.H43 2008
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Immunologic indices of influenza virus circulation among indigenous population on the territory of the Extreme North of Siberia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85421
Source
Pages 123-124 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
n:iv:UHOLOGIC lliDici.;s Ct' EĀ·IFLUJ>NZA VIRUS CIRCULATJON AMOliG INDIGENOUS POPUL.;.'l'ION ON THE TlillRITORY OF Tl:lli ~'IREM.b; NOR'rH CF srn;,;RIA V.K.':' as tr e b o v, ;i.,:.o bros ova-Sero v a, Yu.v.c h e r n e t s o v, s.S.Ya m n i k o v a, I,.A;.K up r y a sh i n a, D.K.~. v o v,t
  1 document  
Author
V.K. Yastrebov
N.P. Obrosova-Serova
Yu.V. Chernetsov
S.S. Yamnikova
L.M. Kupryashina
D.K. Lvov
N.N. Sokolova
Author Affiliation
Moscow, USSR
Source
Pages 123-124 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Date
1978
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Extreme North
Immunologic indices
Indigenous population
Influenza virus
Siberia
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16 records – page 1 of 2.