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Alaskan Inuit food security conceptual framework : how to assess the Arctic from an Inuit perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296240
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. Brochure. 2 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2015
around us. All that is around us physically and spiritually nourishes us, and our culture reflects the Arctic because we are part of this ecosystem. With these rapid changes comes the need for holistic information based on Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and science. With this understanding, we brought our
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. Brochure. 2 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
6195361
Keywords
Alaska
Inuit
Traditional diet
Food security
Indigenous knowledge
Documents

alaskan_inuite_food_security_food_brochure.pdf

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Alaskan Inuit food security conceptual framework : how to assess the Arctic from an Inuit perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295946
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. Technical report. 116 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
All information and concepts within this report are a product of a collaborative effort among 146 contributing authors (all Indigenous Knowledge holders), the project Advisory Committee and the Inuit Circumpolar Council-Alaska. This project has been managed and facilitated by the Inuit Circumpolar
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. Technical report. 116 pp.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
12846313
Keywords
Alaska
Inuit
Traditional diet
Food security
Indigenous knowledge
Documents

InuitCircumpolarCouncilFoodSecurity-FullAssessmentReport.pdf

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Community-based monitoring and Indigenous knowledge in a changing Arctic: a review for the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297093
Source
Final report to Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks. Inuit Circumpolar Council. Ottawa, ON. 62 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 2016
i Community-Based Monitoring and Indigenous Knowledge in a Changing Arctic: A Review for the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks Noor Johnson, Carolina Behe, Finn Danielsen, Eva-Maria Krummel, Scot Nickels, and Peter L. Pulsifer Community-Based Monitoring and Indigenous Knowledge in a
  1 document  
Author
Johnson, Noor
Behe, Carolina
Danielsen, Finn
Krummel, Eva-Maria
Nickels, Scot
Pulsifer, Peter L.
Source
Final report to Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks. Inuit Circumpolar Council. Ottawa, ON. 62 p.
Date
March 2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
44328130
Keywords
Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON)
Indigenous knowledge
Community-based monitoring
Documents
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Constructing an indigenous-centered and decolonizing research methodology

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96063
Source
Page 371 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
CONSTRUCTING AN INDIGENOUS-CENTERED AND DECOLONIZING RESEARCH METHODOLOGY G. Baikie Dalhousie University (faculty), Memorial University (student) I wanted to investigate the traditional and contemporary Indigenous knowledge being used and created by an international group of Indigenous
  1 document  
Author
Baikie, G.
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University (faculty)
Memorial University (student)
Source
Page 371 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Appropriate research methodology
Decolonized data
Euro-western knowledge
Indigenous knowledge
Neocolonial practice settings
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 9. Indigenous Health and Wellbeing.
Documents
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Contaminants, health, and effective risk assessment & communication in the circumpolar north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96122
Source
Page 318 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
Studies Program, Trent University There is growing recognition of the importance of Indigenous knowledge and the incorporation of Indigenous perspectives and perceptions in environment and health research today. There have been certain challenges when assessing and communicating environmental health
  1 document  
Author
Friendship, K.
Furgal, C.
Council of Yukon First Nations, Yukon Contaminants Committee
Author Affiliation
Canadian Studies Indigenous Studies Graduate Program, Trent University
Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent University
Source
Page 318 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Greenland
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cross-cultural misunderstandings
Environment and health research
Indigenous knowledge
Politicization of information
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Contaminants, health, effective risk assessment and communication in the circumpolar north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286400
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
identify the role that Indigenous knowledge can play in risk assess- ment and management processes in order to support and ensure more culturally relevant and effective benefit-risk management strategies . Study design: This work is a part of a circum - polar review that is conducting case study
  1 document  
Author
Katelyn Friendship
Chris Furgal
Author Affiliation
Frost Centre for Canadian Studies- Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Studies Department, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Risk Management
Risk perception
Traditional foods
Contaminants
Traditional knowledge
Collaboration
Arctic Regions
Cross-cultural misunderstandings
Environment and health research
Indigenous knowledge
Politicization of information
Abstract
Objectives: With a better understanding of northern Indigenous risk perceptions related to food safety, this research aims to identify the role that Indigenous knowledge can play in risk assessment and management processes in order to support and ensure more culturally relevant and effective benefit-risk management strategies. Study design: This work is a part of a circumpolar review that is conducting case study evaluations in four regions on the topic of Indigenous environmental health benefit-risk assessment and communication in relation to contaminant exposure through the consumption of traditional/country foods. Methods: This project examines a series of events and communities in Yukon Territory, Canada. Forty-one interviews with traditional food experts (TFE) and environment and health decision-makers (HEDM) were conducted and analysed for thematic content. The research also included an extensive document review. Results: Overall, people are confident in their own ways of determining the safety of food items. This is predominately based on physical indicators. Of the HEDM interviewees, there were varied levels of experience for including traditional knowledge in risk management; 45% had direct experience, 36% had experience in other aspects of research and 18% had no direct experience. All interviewees discussed collaboration as a valuable process for effective risk management. Conclusions: â??Effective risk management" is dictated by the effort given to include the affected communities or populations. Yukon First Nations have their own way for determining food safety, and these methods and perceptions need to be considered in the framing of risk issues and from the initial stages of the management process. True collaboration is crucial for effectiveness.
Documents
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The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297319
Source
Arctic Research Consortium of the United States in cooperation with the Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution. 384 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2002
, Fikret Berkes, Jennifer Castleden, Theresa Nichols, and the community of Sachs Harbour 4 Coastal Sea Ice Watch:Private Confessions of a Convert to Indigenous Knowledge ............................. 126 David Norton 5 Watching Ice and Weather Our Way:Some Lessons from Yupik Observations of Sea Ice and
  1 document  
Author
Krupnik, Igor
Jolly, Dyanna
Source
Arctic Research Consortium of the United States in cooperation with the Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution. 384 p.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1795650
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Indians of North America
Indigenous knowledge
Notes
ISBN 0-9720449-0-6
Table of Contents: These are Things That are Really Happening: Inuit Perspectives on the Evidence and Impacts of Climate Change in Nunavut by Shari Fox. Community Contributions to Ecological Monitoring: Knowledge Co-production in the U.S.-Canada Arctic Borderlands by Gary Kofinas with the communities of Aklavik, Arctic Village, Old Crow, and Fort McPherson. We Can’t Predict the Weather Like We Used to: Inuvialuit Observations of Climate Change, Sachs Harbour, Western Canadian Arctic by Dyanna Jolly, Fikret Berkes, Jennifer Castleden, Theresa Nichols, and the community of Sachs Harbour. Coastal Sea Ice Watch: Private Confessions of a Convert to Indigenous Knowledge by David Norton. Watching Ice and Weather Our Way: Some Lessons from Yupik Observations of Sea Ice and Weather on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska by Igor Krupnik. Nowadays it is Not the Same: Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit, Climate and Caribou in the Kitikmeot Region of Nunavut, Canada by Natasha Thorpe, Sandra Eyegetok, Naikak Hakongak, and the Kitikmeot Elders. Travelling with Fred George: The Changing Ways of Yup’ik Star Navigation in Akiachak, Western Alaska by Claudette Bradley. Climate Change and Health in Nunavik and Laborador: Lessons from Inuit Knowledge by Christopher Furgal, Daniel Martin, and Pierre Gosselin. Putting the Human Face on Climate Change Through Community Workshops: Inuit Knowledge, Partnerships, and Research by Scott Nickels, Christopher Furgal, Jennifer Castleden, Pitseolalaq Moss-Davies, Mark Buell, Barbara Armstrong, Diane Dillon, and Robin Fonger. Epilogue: Making Sense of Arctic Environmental Change? by Fikret Berkes. Indigenous Views on Climate Change: A Circumpolar Perspective by Tero Mustonen
Documents
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A framework for First Nations: Inuit and Métis nursing: Cultural competence and cultural safety in nursing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294116
Source
Aboriginal Nurses Association of Canada. 15 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
.......................................................................................................................................... 10  4. Respect ................................................................................................................................................ 11  5. Indigenous knowledge
  1 document  
Author
Hart-Wasekeesikaw, Fjola
Source
Aboriginal Nurses Association of Canada. 15 p.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
606066
Keywords
Core nursing education competencies
Indigenous knowledge
Canada
Documents

First_Nations_Framework_e.pdf

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Health sciences research and Aboriginal communities: Pathway or pitfall?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76458
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Mar;26(3):211-216.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Smylie J
Kaplan-Myrth N
Tait C
Martin CM
Chartrand L
Hogg W
Tugwell P
Valaskakis G
Macaulay AC
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Mar;26(3):211-216.
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal health research
Colonialism
Western science and Indigenous knowledge systems
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To provide health researchers and clinicians with background information and examples regarding Aboriginal health research challenges, in an effort to promote effective collaborative research with Aboriginal communities. METHODS: An interdisciplinary team of experienced Aboriginal-health researchers conducted a thematic analysis of their planning meetings regarding a community-based Aboriginal health research training project and of the text generated by the meetings and supplemented the analysis with a literature review. RESULTS: Four research challenges are identified and addressed: (1) contrasting frameworks of Western science and Indigenous knowledge systems; (2) the impact of historic colonialist processes upon the interface between health science research and Aboriginal communities; (3) culturally relevant frameworks and processes for knowledge generation and knowledge transfer; and (4) Aboriginal leadership, governance, and participation. CONCLUSION: Culturally appropriate and community-controlled collaborative research can result in improved health outcomes in Aboriginal communities and contribute new insights and perspectives to the fields of public health and medicine in general.
Notes
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Indigenous health leadership: Protocols, policy, and practice

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265644
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health. 2013;11(3):565-578
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 website  
Author
Gomes, T
Young Leon, A
Brown, L
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health. 2013;11(3):565-578
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal community health
Cultural Competency
Cultural harm restorative practices
Culturally relevant health education
Health Policy
Human rights health care practice
Indigenous knowledge protocols
Indigenous pre-research protocols
Protection of Indigenous knowledge
Abstract
This article describes the process of the Vancouver Coastal Health's Aboriginal Health Practice Council (AHPC) who provide policy direction to Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH). The AHPC operates within unceded territories in what is now known as British Columbia, Canada. The council consists of Aboriginal Elders, knowledge keepers, community members, and VCH staff who work collaboratively to develop and implement best health care practices for Aboriginal people. Working within local Indigenous protocols to create policy for service delivery this council operates under the assumption that to improve health outcomes it is incumbent for VCH to create appropriate methods of access to Aboriginal health practices. The council facilitates Aboriginal leadership in policy development informing health care practitioners on how they can support Aboriginal clients' right to culturally appropriate Aboriginal health care services. The article describes the processes employed by the Aboriginal Health Practice Council. These processes offer a methodology for non-Indigenous organizations serving Aboriginal peoples to implement Indigenous community-based research principles, protocols, and practices central in the provision of effective, culturally appropriate health care.
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18 records – page 1 of 2.