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A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
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A 7-year prospective study of sense of humor and mortality in an adult county population: the HUNT-2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140723
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sven Svebak
Solfrid Romundstad
Jostein Holmen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. sven.svebak@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Wit and Humor as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
To prospectively explore the significance of sense of humor for survival over 7 years in an adult county population.
Residents in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, aged 20 and older, were invited to take part in a public health survey during 1995-97 (HUNT-2), and 66,140 (71.2 %) participated. Sense of humor was estimated by responses to a cognitive (N = 53,546), social (N = 52,198), and affective (N = 53,132) item, respectively, taken from the Sense of Humor Questionnaire (SHQ). Sum scores were tested by Cox survival regression analyses applied to gender, age, and subjective health.
Hazard ratios were reduced with sense of humor (continuous scale: HR = 0.73; high versus low by median split: HR = 0.50) as contrasted with increase of HR with a number of classical risk factors (e.g., cardiovascular disease: HR = 6.28; diabetes: HR = 4.86; cancer: HR = 4.18; poor subjective health: HR = 2.89). Gender proved to be of trivial importance to the effect of sense of humor in survival. Subjective health correlated positively with sense of humor and therefore might have presented a spurious relation of survival with humor, but sense of humor proved to reduce HR both in individuals with poor and good subjective health. However, above age 65 the effect of sense of humor on survival became less evident.
Sense of humor appeared to increase the probability of survival into retirement, and this effect appeared independent of subjective health. Age under 65 mediated this effect, whereas it disappeared beyond this age.
PubMed ID
20848871 View in PubMed
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[10-year dynamics of attitude to health problems in the male population of Novosibirsk (epidemiological study based on the WHO MONICA program)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74937
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
V V Gafarov
V A Pak
I V Gagulin
T D Babina
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Siberia - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
AIM: To evaluate changes for a decade in the attitude of men in Novosibirsk to health problems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: WHO program MONICA has covered males aged 25-64 years (a representative sample from the population in one of the districts of Novosibirsk city). A total of 3 trials were made (in 1984, 1988 and 1994) which included questioning, registration of ECG, arterial pressure, height, body mass, biochemical tests of the blood. RESULTS: Attitude of men to their health depended on their age. There was a trend to evaluate their health as more and more poor in men at the age of 25-43 and 35-44 years. In the group of 45-54-year-olds positive assessment of health was encountered 1.9 times more frequently, but the difference was not significant. At the age 55-64 years a growing number of men tend to assess their health as good. Since 1994 alcoholics among the elderly men grew in number as a response to the social and economic crisis. CONCLUSION: The change in health evaluation from negative to positive in older men may relate to less intensive work.
PubMed ID
12652951 View in PubMed
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[21,799 neonates screened for cystic fibrosis with BM-Test Meconium]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60832
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1976 Oct 11;138(42):2551-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-11-1976

30-Day Survival Probabilities as a Quality Indicator for Norwegian Hospitals: Data Management and Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273361
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0136547
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sahar Hassani
Anja Schou Lindman
Doris Tove Kristoffersen
Oliver Tomic
Jon Helgeland
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0136547
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Episode of Care
Hospital Mortality
Hospital records
Hospitals - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient transfer
Probability
Quality Improvement
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC) reports 30-day survival as a quality indicator for Norwegian hospitals. The indicators have been published annually since 2011 on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health (www.helsenorge.no), as part of the Norwegian Quality Indicator System authorized by the Ministry of Health. Openness regarding calculation of quality indicators is important, as it provides the opportunity to critically review and discuss the method. The purpose of this article is to describe the data collection, data pre-processing, and data analyses, as carried out by NOKC, for the calculation of 30-day risk-adjusted survival probability as a quality indicator.
Three diagnosis-specific 30-day survival indicators (first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture) are estimated based on all-cause deaths, occurring in-hospital or out-of-hospital, within 30 days counting from the first day of hospitalization. Furthermore, a hospital-wide (i.e. overall) 30-day survival indicator is calculated. Patient administrative data from all Norwegian hospitals and information from the Norwegian Population Register are retrieved annually, and linked to datasets for previous years. The outcome (alive/death within 30 days) is attributed to every hospital by the fraction of time spent in each hospital. A logistic regression followed by a hierarchical Bayesian analysis is used for the estimation of risk-adjusted survival probabilities. A multiple testing procedure with a false discovery rate of 5% is used to identify hospitals, hospital trusts and regional health authorities with significantly higher/lower survival than the reference. In addition, estimated risk-adjusted survival probabilities are published per hospital, hospital trust and regional health authority. The variation in risk-adjusted survival probabilities across hospitals for AMI shows a decreasing trend over time: estimated survival probabilities for AMI in 2011 varied from 80.6% (in the hospital with lowest estimated survival) to 91.7% (in the hospital with highest estimated survival), whereas it ranged from 83.8% to 91.2% in 2013.
Since 2011, several hospitals and hospital trusts have initiated quality improvement projects, and some of the hospitals have improved the survival over these years. Public reporting of survival/mortality indicators are increasingly being used as quality measures of health care systems. Openness regarding the methods used to calculate the indicators are important, as it provides the opportunity of critically reviewing and discussing the methods in the literature. In this way, the methods employed for establishing the indicators may be improved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26352600 View in PubMed
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2006 behavioral health prevalence estimates in Alaska: Serious behavioral health disorders by household

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101177
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2008
  1 website  
Author
WICHE Mental Health Program
Date
Jan-15-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age group
Alaska household demographics
Co-occurring disorders
Indicators
Populations
Prevalence estimates
Serious emotional disturbance (SED)
Serious mental illness (SMI)
Substance Use Disorders (SUD)
Abstract
This report is the first phase of a larger project to generate indicators of disparities in care and unmet need in Alaska. It provides prevalence estimates of serious behavioral health disorders. Prevalence estimates provide a standardized basis for defining the need for services in a population. The second phase of this larger project assesses the number of individuals who actually receive services. The third phase combines the information to generate indicators of unmet need and disparities in care. The project is an initiative of the Division of Behavioral Health (the Division) of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. The Division contracted with the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Mental Health Program to facilitate the project. Phase I prevalence estimates were generated by an epidemiologist who has developed a technology specifically for this purpose. The synthetic estimation technology has been used for mental disorders by ten western states; Alaska is the first to use the substance use estimates.
Online Resources
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Abnormal glucose regulation and gender-specific risk of fatal coronary artery disease in the HUNT 1 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127351
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Aug;46(4):219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erik Madssen
Lars Vatten
Tom Ivar Nilsen
Kristian Midthjell
Rune Wiseth
Ane Cecilie Dale
Author Affiliation
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Aug;46(4):219-25
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - metabolism - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - metabolism
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Abstract
To assess fatal coronary artery disease (CAD) by gender and glucose regulation status.
47,951 people were followed up according to fatal CAD identified in the National Cause of Death Registry. Gender-effects of fatal CAD in people with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), newly diagnosed diabetes (NDM) or known diabetes (KDM) compared with people with normal glucose regulation (NGR) were calculated using Cox regression.
Using NGR as reference, the hazard ratios (HR, 95% confidence intervals) associated with IGR was 1.2 (0.8-1.9) for women and 1.2 (0.9-1.6) for men. The corresponding HRs were 1.6 (1.2-2.2) and 1.4 (1.1.-1.9) for NDM, and 2.5 (2.1-2.8) and 1.8 (1.6-2.1) for KDM. The gender-difference in mortality varied by category (P(interaction) = 0.003). Using women as the reference, the HRs for men were 2.1 (2.0-2.3) for NGR, 1.8 (1.0-3.3) for IGR, 1.6 (1.0-2.5) for NDM, and 1.2 (1.0-1.5) for KDM.
Diabetes mellitus, but not IGR, was associated with fatal CAD in both genders. The known gender-difference in CAD mortality was attenuated in people with abnormal glucose regulation, evident already in people with IGR.
PubMed ID
22303857 View in PubMed
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Abnormal hematologic profiles in elite cross-country skiers: blood doping or?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71327
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 May;13(3):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
James Stray-Gundersen
Tapio Videman
Ilkka Penttilä
Inggard Lereim
Author Affiliation
jimsg@singlepoint.net
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 May;13(3):132-7
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Doping in Sports - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices - drug effects
Erythropoiesis - drug effects - physiology
Female
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reticulocyte Count
Skiing - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is widespread public concern about fairness in sports. Blood doping undermines fairness and places athletes' health at risk. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of abnormal hematologic profiles in elite cross-country skiers, which may indicate a high probability of blood doping. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Samples were obtained as part of routine International Ski Federation blood testing procedures from participants at the World Ski Championships. Sixty-eight percent of all skiers and 92% of those finishing in the top 10 places were tested. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Using flow cytometry, we analyzed erythrocyte and reticulocyte indices. Reference values were from the 1989 Nordic Ski World Championships data set and the International Olympic Committee Erythropoietin 2000 project. RESULTS: Of the skiers tested and finishing within the top 50 places in the competitions, 17% had "highly abnormal" hematologic profiles, 19% had "abnormal" values, and 64% were normal. Fifty percent of medal winners and 33% of those finishing from 4th to 10th place had highly abnormal hematologic profiles. In contrast, only 3% of skiers finishing from 41st to 50th place had highly abnormal values. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that blood doping is both prevalent and effective in cross-country ski racing, and current testing programs for blood doping are ineffective. It is unlikely that blood doping is less common in other endurance sports. Ramifications of doping affect not only elite athletes who may feel compelled to risk their health but also the general population, particularly young people.
PubMed ID
12792206 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's experience when interacting with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: a brief note.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157234
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Alistair Campbell
Barbara Hayes
Beryl Buckby
Author Affiliation
James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. alistair.campbell@jcu.edu.au
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is one of the most widely used screening instruments for maternal perinatal anxiety and depression. It has maintained its robust performance when translated into multiple languages, when used prenatally and when used with perinatal fathers; thus the tool is also known as the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS). However, there have been no published psychometric data on versions of the EPDS adapted for screening Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. We describe the development of 'translations' of the EPDS and report their basic psychometric properties.
During the Queensland arm of the beyond blue National Postnatal Depression Program (2001-2005), partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were forged. At TAIHS' stand alone "Mums and Babies" unit 181 women of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent were recruited into the study through their antenatal and postnatal visits and 25 were recruited at Mt Isa. Participants completed either the translation or the standard version of the EPDS both antenatally and postnatally.
The 'translations' of the EPDS demonstrated a high level of reliability. The was a strong correlation between the 'translations' and the EPDS. The 'translations' and the standard EPDS both identified high rates of women at risk of depression although the 'translations' identified higher rates.
We argue that the 'translation' may have been a more accurate predictor of perinatal women at risk for depression, but acknowledge that a lack of validity evidence weakens this conclusion.
PubMed ID
18471181 View in PubMed
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2738 records – page 1 of 274.