Skip header and navigation

Refine By

90 records – page 1 of 9.

Aboriginal experiences of aging and dementia in a context of sociocultural change: qualitative analysis of key informant group interviews with Aboriginal seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137393
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2011 Mar;26(1):103-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Shawnda Lanting
Margaret Crossley
Debra Morgan
Allison Cammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Arts Building, 9 Campus Drive, S7N 5A5 Saskatoon, SK, Canada. shawnda.lanting@usask.ca
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2011 Mar;26(1):103-17
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Evolution
Dementia - ethnology - psychology
Family
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Neuropsychological Tests
Qualitative Research
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Examining the role of culture and cultural perceptions of aging and dementia in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of age-related cognitive impairment remains an understudied area of clinical neuropsychology. This paper describes a qualitative study based on a series of key informant group interviews with an Aboriginal Grandmothers Group in the province of Saskatchewan. Thematic analysis was employed in an exploration of Aboriginal perceptions of normal aging and dementia and an investigation of issues related to the development of culturally appropriate assessment techniques. Three related themes were identified that highlighted Aboriginal experiences of aging, caregiving, and dementia within the healthcare system: (1) cognitive and behavioural changes were perceived as a normal expectation of the aging process and a circular conception of the lifespan was identified, with aging seen as going back "back to the baby stage", (2) a "big change in culture" was linked by Grandmothers to Aboriginal health, illness (including dementia), and changes in the normal aging process, and (3) the importance of culturally grounded healthcare both related to review of assessment tools, but also within the context of a more general discussion of experiences with the healthcare system. Themes of sociocultural changes leading to lifestyle changes and disruption of the family unit and community caregiving practices, and viewing memory loss and behavioural changes as a normal part of the aging process were consistent with previous work with ethnic minorities. This research points to the need to understand Aboriginal perceptions of aging and dementia in informing appropriate assessment and treatment of age-related cognitive impairment and dementia in Aboriginal seniors.
PubMed ID
21287400 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abuse of power in relationships and sexual health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289990
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Dionne Gesink
Lana Whiskeyjack
Terri Suntjens
Alanna Mihic
Priscilla McGilvery
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College St., 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7, Canada. Electronic address: dionne.gesink@utoronto.ca.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Suicide - ethnology - psychology
United States - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
STI rates are high for First Nations in Canada and the United States. Our objective was to understand the context, issues, and beliefs around high STI rates from a nêhiyaw (Cree) perspective. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 community participants between March 1, 2011 and May 15, 2011. Interviews were conducted by community researchers and grounded in the Cree values of relationship, sharing, personal agency and relational accountability. A diverse purposive snowball sample of community members were asked why they thought STI rates were high for the community. The remainder of the interview was unstructured, and supported by the interviewer through probes and sharing in a conversational style. Modified grounded theory was used to analyze the narratives and develop a theory. The main finding from the interviews was that abuse of power in relationships causes physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wounds that disrupt the medicine wheel. Wounded individuals seek medicine to stop suffering and find healing. Many numb suffering by accessing temporary medicines (sex, drugs and alcohol) or permanent medicines (suicide). These medicines increase the risk of STIs. Some seek healing by participating in ceremony and restoring relationships with self, others, Spirit/religion, traditional knowledge and traditional teachings. These medicines decrease the risk of STIs. Younger female participants explained how casual relationships are safer than committed monogamous relationships. Resolving abuse of power in relationships should lead to improvements in STI rates and sexual health.
PubMed ID
27337692 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability of a web-based community reinforcement approach for substance use disorders with treatment-seeking American Indians/Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270301
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2015 May;51(4):393-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Aimee N C Campbell
Eva Turrigiano
Michelle Moore
Gloria M Miele
Traci Rieckmann
Mei-Chen Hu
Frankie Kropp
Roz Ringor-Carty
Edward V Nunes
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2015 May;51(4):393-403
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Internet
Interviews as Topic
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Longstanding disparities in substance use disorders and treatment access exist among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Computerized, web-delivered interventions have potential to increase access to quality treatment and improve patient outcomes. Prior research supports the efficacy of a web-based version [therapeutic education system (TES)] of the community reinforcement approach to improve outcomes among outpatients in substance abuse treatment; however, TES has not been tested among AI/AN. The results from this mixed method acceptability study among a diverse sample of urban AI/AN (N = 40) show that TES was acceptable across seven indices (range 7.8-9.4 on 0-10 scales with 10 indicating highest acceptability). Qualitative interviews suggest adaptation specific to AI/AN culture could improve adoption. Additional efforts to adapt TES and conduct a larger effectiveness study are warranted.
Notes
Cites: Contemp Clin Trials. 2012 Mar;33(2):386-9522085803
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):291-622400459
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):319-2422400463
Cites: Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2012;8:131-6022149479
Cites: J Addict Dis. 2012;31(3):313-822873192
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):372-522931068
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):376-8222931069
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):483-9222931083
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2001;10(2):67-8411698984
Cites: J Subst Abuse Treat. 2003 Sep;25(2):117-2114680015
Cites: Alcohol. 2004 Jan;32(1):37-4315066702
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):755S-759S10195598
Cites: Lancet. 1999 May 15;353(9165):1657-6110335785
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;62(1):99-10815630077
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Nov 3;353(18):1881-316267317
Cites: J Pers Assess. 2006 Apr;86(2):150-6116599789
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 May;96(5):889-9616571710
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 May;64(5):566-7617485608
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jul;64(7):830-4217606817
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2011 Sep;37(5):333-821854275
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;168(8):790-921536689
Cites: Med J Aust. 2011 Aug 1;195(3):S44-5021806518
Cites: Implement Sci. 2011;6:6321679438
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 May 1;115(1-2):74-921131143
Cites: J Addict Dis. 2011 Jan;30(1):63-7421218312
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2009 Dec;(242):1-15720821903
Cites: Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2010 Oct;12(5):426-3220683681
Cites: Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008 Apr;16(2):132-4318489017
Cites: Am J Addict. 2001;10 Suppl:51-911268821
Cites: Addiction. 2000 Nov;95(11):1712-511219379
Cites: J Ethn Subst Abuse. 2009;8(3):283-30020157631
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;171(6):683-9024700332
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2014 May;71(5):566-7224671165
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;171(4):436-4424577287
Cites: Alcohol Res Health. 2010;33(1-2):152-6021209793
Cites: Community Ment Health J. 2013 Dec;49(6):714-2122843125
Cites: J Subst Abuse Treat. 2014 Jan;46(1):43-5124060350
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;165(7):881-818450927
PubMed ID
25022913 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability of telepsychiatry in American Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85757
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2008 Jun;14(5):461-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Shore Jay H
Brooks Elizabeth
Savin Daniel
Orton Heather
Grigsby Jim
Manson Spero M
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045-0508, USA. jay.shore@uchsc.edu
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2008 Jun;14(5):461-6
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colorado
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient satisfaction
Psychiatry
Telemedicine
Abstract
Telepsychiatry differs from in-person treatment in terms of its delivery mechanism, and this dissimilarity may increase cultural differences between the provider and the patient. Because cultural competence and identification can impact patient satisfaction ratings, we wanted to explore whether cultural differences in our study population influenced telepsychiatric and in-person interviews. Here, we compared the acceptability of conducting psychiatric assessments with rural American Indian veterans by real-time videoconferencing versus inperson administration. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IIIR (SCID) was given to participants both in person and by telehealth. A process measure was created to assess participants' responses to the interview type concerning the usability of the technology, the perceptions of the interviewee/interviewer interaction, the cultural competence of the interview, and satisfaction with the interview and the interview process. The process measure was administered to 53 American Indian Vietnam veterans both in-person and by real-time interactive videoconferencing. Mean responses were compared for each participant. Interviewers were also asked several of the same questions as the participants; answers were compared to the corresponding participant responses. Overall, telepsychiatry was well received and comparable in level of patient comfort, satisfaction, and cultural acceptance to in-person interviews. We also found evidence to suggest that interviewers sometimes interpreted participant satisfaction as significantly less favorable than the participants actually responded. Despite the potential of videoconferencing to increase cultural differences, we found that it is an acceptable means for psychiatric assessment of American Indian veterans and presents an opportunity to provide mental health services to a population that might otherwise not have access.
PubMed ID
18578681 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska Native Elders in Recovery: Linkages between Indigenous Cultural Generativity and Sobriety to Promote Successful Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291474
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2017 Jun; 32(2):209-222
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Jordan P Lewis
James Allen
Author Affiliation
WWAMI School of Medical Education, UAA College of Health, 3211 Providence Drive, HSB 301, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. jplewis@alaska.edu.
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2017 Jun; 32(2):209-222
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Alaska
Alaska Natives - psychology
Alcohol Abstinence - psychology
Alcoholism - therapy
Culture
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Rural Population
Spirituality
Abstract
This article builds on the People Awakening (PA) Project, which explored an Alaska Native (AN) understanding of the recovery process from alcohol use disorder and sobriety. The aim of this study is to explore motivating and maintenance factors for sobriety among older AN adult participants (age 50+) from across Alaska. Ten life history narratives of Alaska Native older adults, representing Alutiiq, Athabascan, Tlingit, Yup'ik/Cup'ik Eskimos, from the PA sample were explored using thematic analysis. AN older adults are motivated to abstain from, or to quit drinking alcohol through spirituality, family influence, role socialization and others' role modeling, and a desire to engage in indigenous cultural generative activities with their family and community. A desire to pass on their accumulated wisdom to a younger generation through engagement and sharing of culturally grounded activities and values, or indigenous cultural generativity, is a central unifying motivational and maintenance factor for sobriety. The implications of this research indicates that family, role expectations and socialization, desire for community and culture engagement, and spirituality are central features to both AN Elders' understanding of sobriety, and more broadly, to their successful aging. Future research is needed to test these findings in population-based studies and to explore incorporation of these findings into alcohol treatment programs to support older AN adults' desire to quit drinking and attain long-term sobriety. Sobriety can put older AN adults on a pathway to successful aging, in positions to serve as role models for their family and community, where they are provided opportunities to engage in meaningful indigenous cultural generative acts.
Notes
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):579-88 PMID 12921201
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):372-5 PMID 22931068
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2004 Mar;130(2):304-23 PMID 14979774
Cites: Gerontologist. 2011 Aug;51(4):540-9 PMID 21357658
Cites: Med Anthropol Q. 2006 Jun;20(2):160-81 PMID 16770909
Cites: Addiction. 1997 Nov;92(11):1507-21 PMID 9519493
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2001 Jul;53(2):227-40 PMID 11414389
Cites: Addiction. 2008 Feb;103(2):205-15 PMID 18042193
Cites: J Prev Interv Community. 2006;32(1-2):41-59 PMID 17000601
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2002;117 Suppl 1:S104-17 PMID 12435834
Cites: J Subst Abuse. 1997;9:41-61 PMID 9494938
Cites: Prev Med. 2006 Oct;43(4):291-305 PMID 16787657
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2007 Jun;27(5):537-51 PMID 17254686
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2004 Jun;33(3-4):263-73 PMID 15212184
Cites: Harm Reduct J. 2004 Nov 17;1(1):10 PMID 15548331
Cites: J Subst Abuse Treat. 2000 Dec;19(4):347-54 PMID 11166499
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):376-82 PMID 22931069
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Oct;51(7):1031-45 PMID 11005391
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 Dec;41(11):1487-98 PMID 8607039
PubMed ID
28478599 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska native suicide: lessons for elder suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3656
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Jun;10(2):205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P. Kettl
Author Affiliation
Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Jun;10(2):205-11
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Epidemiologic Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology
Abstract
Suicide rates in Alaska Native elders are studied to further explore cultural factors in elderly suicide. Data for the 1960s and 1970s are reviewed, and new data on Alaska Native suicide rates are presented for the 10-year period of 1985 through 1994. In many areas throughout the world, suicide rates are the highest for the elderly. During the Alaska "oil boom," suicide rates more than tripled for the general population but decreased to zero for Alaska Native elders. Cultural teachings from the society's elders were more important during this time of culture upheaval. During the study period, the cultural changes dissipated, and suicide rates for Alaska Native elders, although lower than those of White Alaskans, increased. This provides further evidence that suicide rates for elders can be influenced by social factors--both to raise to lower rates.
PubMed ID
9677507 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and drug dependency in Saskatchewan, 1969-1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241757
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1983 Jul;44(4):630-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
C. D'Arcy
G. Bold
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1983 Jul;44(4):630-46
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospitalization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
The demographic characteristics and the trends in health care utilization of alcohol- and drug-dependent residents of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan from 1969 to 1974 are examined.
PubMed ID
6632882 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol use among reserve-dwelling adult First Nation members: use, problems, and intention to change drinking behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266062
Source
Addict Behav. 2015 Feb;41:232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Nichea S Spillane
Brenna Greenfield
Kamilla Venner
Christopher W Kahler
Source
Addict Behav. 2015 Feb;41:232-7
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Culture
Drinking Behavior
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Although alcohol use was not part of traditional First Nation (FN) life, alcohol misuse currently poses a significant public health problem. There is a dearth of research efforts to understand both alcohol misuse and efforts to resolve these problems. The primary aims of this study were to 1) present descriptive data on alcohol use in FN adults living on one reserve in Eastern Canada; and 2) explore correlates of help seeking intentions and past behaviors.
We administered questionnaires to 211 FN people (96 men; 113 women; 2 unknown).
Nearly two-thirds of our sample were current drinkers (N=150). Of those, 29% endorsed they needed help with their drinking, and half reported that they would probably try to cut down or stop drinking in the next year. Multiple regression analyses suggested that drinking was positively associated with a greater perceived need for help with drinking (ß=.40, p=
Notes
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1995 Jul;56(4):383-947674672
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 1995 Feb;104(1):32-407897051
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;62(1):99-10815630077
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005 Jan;29(1):107-1615654299
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2006 Mar;132(2):249-6816536643
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2006 Apr;57(4):512-2016603747
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007 Jan 12;86(2-3):214-2116919401
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2007 May;133(3):395-41817469984
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 May;64(5):566-7617485608
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jul;64(7):830-4217606817
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2010 Nov;34(11):1985-9220659067
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 May;35(5):984-9521314696
Cites: Addict Behav. 2012 Nov;37(11):1285-822727788
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):376-8222931069
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):483-9222931083
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):505-1022931086
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jan;37 Suppl 1:E314-2122823415
Cites: Addict Behav. 2013 Sep;38(9):2450-423688908
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Oct;93(10):1683-514534221
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 Nov;27(11):1785-9714634495
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Mar;65(2):217-2615151353
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 1992 Feb;101(1):174-831537963
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1996 Nov;20(8):1438-428947322
PubMed ID
25452070 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1993;5(1):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H C Hendrie
K S Hall
N. Pillay
D. Rodgers
C. Prince
J. Norton
H. Brittain
A. Nath
A. Blue
J. Kaufert
Author Affiliation
Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Indianapolis 46202-5110.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1993;5(1):5-14
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Abstract
A community survey and subsequent clinical assessment of 192 Cree aged 65 years and over registered in two Reserves in Northern Manitoba identified only one case of probable Alzheimer's disease among eight cases of dementia, giving a prevalence of 0.5% for Alzheimer's disease and 4.2% for all dementias. This contrasted with an age-adjusted prevalence of 3.5% for Alzheimer's disease and 4.2% for all dementias in an age-stratified sample of 241 English-speaking residents of Winnipeg. Although it was not so for all dementias, the difference between the groups for prevalence of Alzheimer's disease was highly significant (p
PubMed ID
8499574 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Indian and Alaska Native Cancer Patients' Perceptions of a Culturally Specific Patient Navigator Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289968
Source
J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr; 38(1-2):121-135
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Carol Grimes
Jenine Dankovchik
Megan Cahn
Victoria Warren-Mears
Author Affiliation
Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, 918 NE Rosa Parks Way, Portland, OR, 97211, USA.
Source
J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr; 38(1-2):121-135
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska Natives - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Idaho
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology
Oregon
Patient Navigation - methods - organization & administration - standards
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
Lack of access to care, funding limitations, cultural, and social barriers are challenges specific to tribal communities that have led to adverse cancer outcomes among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). While the cancer navigator model has been shown to be effective in other underserved communities, it has not been widely implemented in Indian Country. We conducted in-depth interviews with 40 AI/AN patients at tribal clinics in Idaho and Oregon. We developed the survey instrument in partnership with community members to ensure a culturally appropriate semi-structured questionnaire. Questions explored barriers to accessing care, perceptions of the navigator program, satisfaction, and recommendations. AI/AN cancer patients reported physical, emotional, financial, and transportation barriers to care, but most did not feel there were any cultural barriers to receiving care. Navigator services most commonly used included decision making, referrals, transportation, scheduling appointments, and communication. Satisfaction with the program was high. Our study provides a template to develop a culturally appropriate survey instrument for use with an AI/AN population, which could be adapted for use with other indigenous patient populations. Although our sample was small, our qualitative analysis facilitated a deeper understanding of the barriers faced by this population and how a navigator program may best address them. The results reveal the strengths and weakness of this program, and provide baseline patient satisfaction numbers which will allow future patient navigator programs to better create evaluation benchmarks.
Notes
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Oct;21(10):1673-81 PMID 23045542
Cites: MMWR Surveill Summ. 2004 Jun 4;53(3):1-108 PMID 15179359
Cites: Cancer. 2008 Sep 1;113(5 Suppl):1131-41 PMID 18720374
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Oct;21(10):1629-38 PMID 23045537
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Mar;12(3):232s-236s PMID 12646516
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Aug;80(2):241-7 PMID 20006459
Cites: J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2011 Nov;22(4):1331-43 PMID 22080713
Cites: Prev Med. 1994 Jul;23(4):461-4 PMID 7971873
Cites: J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2012 Feb;23(1):398-413 PMID 22423178
Cites: Cancer. 2007 Nov 15;110(10):2119-52 PMID 17939129
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S439-45 PMID 24754659
Cites: CA Cancer J Clin. 2004 Mar-Apr;54(2):78-93 PMID 15061598
Cites: Cancer Control. 2008 Jul;15(3):254-9 PMID 18596678
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Oct;21(10):1691-700 PMID 23045544
Cites: CA Cancer J Clin. 2010 Sep-Oct;60(5):277-300 PMID 20610543
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Oct;21(10):1645-54 PMID 23045539
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 1999 Jun;16(3):190-7 PMID 10388336
Cites: Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1587-91 PMID 8839576
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2013 Mar;28(1):109-18 PMID 23242563
Cites: Semin Oncol Nurs. 2013 May;29(2):118-27 PMID 23651681
Cites: Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2012 Feb;16(1):73-82, 89 PMID 22297010
Cites: Hawaii Med J. 2011 Dec;70(12):257-61 PMID 22187512
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Oct;21(10):1620-8 PMID 23045536
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S415-22 PMID 24754650
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2014 Sep 19;14:407 PMID 25234963
Cites: J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii44-55 PMID 15933330
Cites: Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1582-6 PMID 8839575
Cites: Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2008 Winter;2(4):329-40 PMID 20208313
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2001 Sep-Oct;116(5):424-33 PMID 12042607
Cites: Cancer Pract. 1998 May-Jun;6(3):191-4 PMID 9652252
PubMed ID
27838858 View in PubMed
Less detail

90 records – page 1 of 9.