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Scaling up the knowledge to achieve Aboriginal wellness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136901
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):73-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Malcolm King
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Aboriginal Peoples' Health, Edmonton, Alberta. king@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):73-4
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Culture
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mental health
Notes
Comment On: Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):84-9121333035
Comment On: Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):75-8321333034
PubMed ID
21333033 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Hosp Physician. 1981 Oct;17(10):122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1981
Author
J C Mason
Source
Hosp Physician. 1981 Oct;17(10):122-5
Date
Oct-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Language
United States
PubMed ID
10252749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rethinking resilience from indigenous perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101842
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Laurence J Kirmayer
Stéphane Dandeneau
Elizabeth Marshall
Morgan Kahentonni Phillips
Karla Jessen Williamson
Author Affiliation
Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. laurence.kirmayer@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):84-91
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Culture
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Mental health
Resilience, Psychological
Abstract
The notions of resilience that have emerged in developmental psychology and psychiatry in recent years require systematic rethinking to address the distinctive cultures, geographic and social settings, and histories of adversity of indigenous peoples. In Canada, the overriding social realities of indigenous peoples include their historical rootedness to a specific place (with traditional lands, communities, and transactions with the environment) and the profound displacements caused by colonization and subsequent loss of autonomy, political oppression, and bureaucratic control. We report observations from an ongoing collaborative project on resilience in Inuit, Métis, Mi'kmaq, and Mohawk communities that suggests the value of incorporating indigenous constructs in resilience research. These constructs are expressed through specific stories and metaphors grounded in local culture and language; however, they can be framed more generally in terms of processes that include: regulating emotion and supporting adaptation through relational, ecocentric, and cosmocentric concepts of self and personhood; revisioning collective history in ways that valorize collective identity; revitalizing language and culture as resources for narrative self-fashioning, social positioning, and healing; and renewing individual and collective agency through political activism, empowerment, and reconciliation. Each of these sources of resilience can be understood in dynamic terms as emerging from interactions between individuals, their communities, and the larger regional, national, and global systems that locate and sustain indigenous agency and identity. This social-ecological view of resilience has important implications for mental health promotion, policy, and clinical practice.
Notes
RefSource: Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):73-4
PubMed ID
21333035 View in PubMed
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The development and evolution of mental health services in the Sioux Lookout zone over a nineteen year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227756
Source
Pages 249-253 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
H A Armstrong
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pages 249-253 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Canada
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Mental health
Mental health services
PubMed ID
1365120 View in PubMed
Documents
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Mental wellness in Canada's Aboriginal communities: striving toward reconciliation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277815
Source
J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2015 Nov;40(6):363-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Patricia Boksa
Ridha Joober
Laurence J Kirmayer
Source
J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2015 Nov;40(6):363-5
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colonialism
Culture
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Mental health
Schools
Notes
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Sep;45(7):607-1611056823
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2011 Sep;48(4):367-9121911507
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 May;74(10):1560-922464223
Cites: Pain Physician. 2012 Jul;15(3 Suppl):ES191-20322786457
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;57(12):745-5123228233
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2013 Jul;88:1-923702204
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;51(3):320-3824065606
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;51(3):299-31924855142
PubMed ID
26513541 View in PubMed
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Understanding cancer-understanding the stories of life and living.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3872
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):12-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jody Pelusi
Linda U Krebs
Author Affiliation
Native American Cancer Research, Pine, CO 80470-7830, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):12-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Narration
Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Storytelling is an effective and efficient educational methodology for American Indians/Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs). It has been used for hundreds of years, is well respected, and has significant implications in the oncology setting. Storytelling not only values the individual sharing the story but also offers educational information and emotional support to those who hear it. METHODS: Content analysis of transcripts from an educational session in which AIs/ANs were encouraged to share stories of living with/surviving cancer identified 12 themes that revealed the essence of their cancer experiences. RESULTS: The themes identified were: cancer journey, responsibility to self and community, getting beyond the diagnosis, cancer lessons-cancer gifts, the strength of our stories, being connected, prospering through cancer, pain is more than a word, survival is an attitude, spirituality and cancer, specific cancer issues and understanding our ways. CONCLUSIONS: These themes are a reminder for health care professionals to spend time looking at, listening to and trying to understand how cancer and its treatments affect the everyday lives of people and families we treat and how this should guide our overall management plan. They teach us the importance of taking time to listen to the stories, responding to the cultural needs of every patient and family member and honoring teach the cancer journeys of all people.
PubMed ID
15916514 View in PubMed
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Volatile substance misuse: a look into the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128395
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e473
Publication Type
Article

Narrative beginnings: traveling to and within unfamiliar landscapes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144113
Source
Qual Health Res. 2010 Sep;20(9):1304-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Vera Caine
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, 7-50 University Terrace, 8303 112 St., Edmonton, Aberta T6G 2T4, Canada. vera.caine@ualberta.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2010 Sep;20(9):1304-11
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
HIV Infections - ethnology - psychology
Homeless Persons - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Narration
Abstract
Drawing on the life stories of Debra, an Aboriginal woman living with HIV, I reflect on the feeling of (dis)placement from a geographic landscape and cultural heritage that both Debra and I experienced, although in different ways. I explore how place is inscribed onto and into our bodies and how home can be understood as embodied. In this way I explore place as geographic position of home and as ontological. In the living out of her stories, Debra made me not only understand the deeper conditions of human life, but that stories told are not fixed texts, that they are composed in and out of the living and in relation to others. The textual representation and physical inscriptions of Debra's stories are another way to not only understand, but to inquire into her life and my own. The inquiry deepened my understanding of nursing practice as a particular, contextual, and meaningful relational engagement.
PubMed ID
20404362 View in PubMed
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The effects of culture, environment, age, and musical training on choices of visual metaphors for sound.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234554
Source
Percept Psychophys. 1987 Nov;42(5):491-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1987

Reflections on a proposed theory of reservation-dwelling American Indian alcohol use: comment on Spillane and Smith (2007).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89806
Source
Psychol Bull. 2009 Mar;135(2):339-43; discussion 344-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Beals Janette
Belcourt-Dittloff Annie
Freedenthal Stacey
Kaufman Carol
Mitchell Christina
Whitesell Nancy
Albright Karen
Beauvais Fred
Belcourt Gordon
Duran Bonnie
Fleming Candace
Floersch Natasha
Foley Kevin
Jervis Lori
Kipp Billie Jo
Mail Patricia
Manson Spero
May Philip
Mohatt Gerald
Morse Bradley
Novins Douglas
O'Connell Joan
Parker Tassy
Quintero Gilbert
Spicer Paul
Stiffman Arlene
Stone Joseph
Trimble Joseph
Venner Kamilla
Walters Karina
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 USA. jan.beals@ucdenver.edu
Source
Psychol Bull. 2009 Mar;135(2):339-43; discussion 344-6
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Motivation
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Risk factors
United States
Abstract
In their recent article, N. Spillane and G. Smith suggested that reservation-dwelling American Indians have higher rates of problem drinking than do either non-American Indians or those American Indians living in nonreservation settings. These authors further argued that problematic alcohol use patterns in reservation communities are due to the lack of contingencies between drinking and "standard life reinforcers" (SLRs), such as employment, housing, education, and health care. This comment presents evidence that these arguments were based on a partial review of the literature. Weaknesses in the application of SLR constructs to American Indian reservation communities are identified as is the need for culturally contextualized empirical evidence supporting this theory and its application. Cautionary notes are offered about the development of literature reviews, theoretical frameworks, and policy recommendations for American Indian communities.
Notes
Comment On: Psychol Bull. 2007 May;133(3):395-41817469984
PubMed ID
19254084 View in PubMed
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472 records – page 1 of 48.