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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
Less detail

Creating exclusive breastfeeding knowledge translation tools with First Nations mothers in Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289659
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32989
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Pertice Moffitt
Raissa Dickinson
Author Affiliation
Health Research Programs, Aurora Research Institute, Aurora College, Yellowknife, NWT, Canada; pmoffitt@auroracollege.nt.ca.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32989
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Northwest Territories
Translational Medical Research - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Breastfeeding is an ideal method of infant feeding affecting lifelong health, and yet the uptake of breastfeeding in some Indigenous communities in Canada's north is low.
The aims of this project were to determine the rate and determinants of exclusive breastfeeding in a remote community in the Northwest Territories and to create knowledge translation tools to enhance breastfeeding locally.
The study methodology followed three steps. Firstly, a series of retrospective chart audits were conducted from hospital birth records of Tli?cho women (n=198) who gave birth during the period of 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012. A second follow-up chart audit determined the rate of exclusive breastfeeding and was conducted in the local Community Health Centre. Chart audit data included the following factors related to breastfeeding: age of mother, parity, birthweight and Apgar scores. Secondly, semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of Tli?cho mothers (n=8) and one Elder were conducted to identify breastfeeding practices, beliefs and the most appropriate medium to use to deliver health messages in Tli?cho. Third, based on the information obtained in Step 2, two knowledge translation tools were developed in collaboration with a local community Advisory Committee.
The rate of exclusive breastfeeding initiation in the Tli?cho region is less than 30%. Physiological and demographic factors related to breastfeeding were identified. Thematic analysis revealed two overarching themes from the data, namely, "the pull to formula" (lifestyle preferences, drug and alcohol use, supplementation practices and limited role models) and "the pull to breast feeding" (traditional feeding method, spiritual practice and increased bonding with infant).
There are a myriad of influences on breastfeeding for women living in remote locations. Ultimately, society informs the choice of infant feeding for the new mother, since mothers' feeding choices are based on contextual realities and circumstances in their lives that are out of their control. As health care providers, it is imperative that we recognize the realities of women's lives and the overlapping social determinants of health that may limit a mother's ability or choice to breastfeed. Further health promotion efforts, grounded in community-based research and a social determinants framework, are needed to improve prenatal and postnatal care of Indigenous women and children in Canada.
Notes
Cites: Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):228-39 PMID 17026430
Cites: J Hum Lact. 2014 May;30(2):229-41 PMID 24352650
Cites: Birth. 2014 Dec;41(4):330-8 PMID 25294061
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002 Jul;156(7):651-5 PMID 12090830
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-61 PMID 16078555
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Mar;62(1):17-39 PMID 12725339
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Jul 5;362(9377):65-71 PMID 12853204
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2012 Oct;22(10):1404-13 PMID 22745362
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Apr;69(2):158-67 PMID 20356467
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Nov 17;74:29469 PMID 26582354
Cites: J Hum Lact. 1994 Sep;10(3):169-76 PMID 7619267
Cites: Adv Neonatal Care. 2005 Apr;5(2):93-103 PMID 15806450
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34 Suppl 2:S24-31 PMID 21151143
Cites: Birth. 2009 Jun;36(2):122-32 PMID 19489806
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Jun;45(2):76-100 PMID 23923728
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Aug 10;74:27672 PMID 26265489
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Jan 30;387(10017):475-90 PMID 26869575
Cites: Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007 Apr;(153):1-186 PMID 17764214
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2001 Dec;2(4):175-7 PMID 15016183
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2016 Mar;19(4):703-15 PMID 26105703
Cites: Health Rep. 2009 Dec;20(4):21-9 PMID 20108603
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2015 Mar;19(3):468-79 PMID 24894730
Cites: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006 Summer;67(2):79-84 PMID 16759434
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 May;95(5):1113-35 PMID 22456657
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2015 Apr 29;106(4):e217-22 PMID 26285193
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Dec;107(12):2071-6 PMID 18060892
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Mar-Apr;101(2):143-8 PMID 20524380
Cites: J Perinat Educ. 2000 Summer;9(3):5-9 PMID 17273212
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):55-64 PMID 15776993
PubMed ID
27938644 View in PubMed
Less detail

Creating exclusive breastfeeding knowledge translation tools with First Nations mothers in Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289501
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32989
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Pertice Moffitt
Raissa Dickinson
Author Affiliation
Health Research Programs, Aurora Research Institute, Aurora College, Yellowknife, NWT, Canada; pmoffitt@auroracollege.nt.ca.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32989
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Northwest Territories
Translational Medical Research - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Breastfeeding is an ideal method of infant feeding affecting lifelong health, and yet the uptake of breastfeeding in some Indigenous communities in Canada's north is low.
The aims of this project were to determine the rate and determinants of exclusive breastfeeding in a remote community in the Northwest Territories and to create knowledge translation tools to enhance breastfeeding locally.
The study methodology followed three steps. Firstly, a series of retrospective chart audits were conducted from hospital birth records of Tli?cho women (n=198) who gave birth during the period of 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012. A second follow-up chart audit determined the rate of exclusive breastfeeding and was conducted in the local Community Health Centre. Chart audit data included the following factors related to breastfeeding: age of mother, parity, birthweight and Apgar scores. Secondly, semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of Tli?cho mothers (n=8) and one Elder were conducted to identify breastfeeding practices, beliefs and the most appropriate medium to use to deliver health messages in Tli?cho. Third, based on the information obtained in Step 2, two knowledge translation tools were developed in collaboration with a local community Advisory Committee.
The rate of exclusive breastfeeding initiation in the Tli?cho region is less than 30%. Physiological and demographic factors related to breastfeeding were identified. Thematic analysis revealed two overarching themes from the data, namely, "the pull to formula" (lifestyle preferences, drug and alcohol use, supplementation practices and limited role models) and "the pull to breast feeding" (traditional feeding method, spiritual practice and increased bonding with infant).
There are a myriad of influences on breastfeeding for women living in remote locations. Ultimately, society informs the choice of infant feeding for the new mother, since mothers' feeding choices are based on contextual realities and circumstances in their lives that are out of their control. As health care providers, it is imperative that we recognize the realities of women's lives and the overlapping social determinants of health that may limit a mother's ability or choice to breastfeed. Further health promotion efforts, grounded in community-based research and a social determinants framework, are needed to improve prenatal and postnatal care of Indigenous women and children in Canada.
Notes
Cites: Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):228-39 PMID 17026430
Cites: J Hum Lact. 2014 May;30(2):229-41 PMID 24352650
Cites: Birth. 2014 Dec;41(4):330-8 PMID 25294061
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002 Jul;156(7):651-5 PMID 12090830
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-61 PMID 16078555
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Mar;62(1):17-39 PMID 12725339
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Jul 5;362(9377):65-71 PMID 12853204
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2012 Oct;22(10):1404-13 PMID 22745362
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Apr;69(2):158-67 PMID 20356467
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Nov 17;74:29469 PMID 26582354
Cites: J Hum Lact. 1994 Sep;10(3):169-76 PMID 7619267
Cites: Adv Neonatal Care. 2005 Apr;5(2):93-103 PMID 15806450
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34 Suppl 2:S24-31 PMID 21151143
Cites: Birth. 2009 Jun;36(2):122-32 PMID 19489806
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Jun;45(2):76-100 PMID 23923728
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Aug 10;74:27672 PMID 26265489
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Jan 30;387(10017):475-90 PMID 26869575
Cites: Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007 Apr;(153):1-186 PMID 17764214
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2001 Dec;2(4):175-7 PMID 15016183
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2016 Mar;19(4):703-15 PMID 26105703
Cites: Health Rep. 2009 Dec;20(4):21-9 PMID 20108603
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2015 Mar;19(3):468-79 PMID 24894730
Cites: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006 Summer;67(2):79-84 PMID 16759434
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 May;95(5):1113-35 PMID 22456657
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2015 Apr 29;106(4):e217-22 PMID 26285193
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Dec;107(12):2071-6 PMID 18060892
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Mar-Apr;101(2):143-8 PMID 20524380
Cites: J Perinat Educ. 2000 Summer;9(3):5-9 PMID 17273212
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):55-64 PMID 15776993
PubMed ID
27938644 View in PubMed
Less detail

The promise and the challenge of the spirit of E.A.G.L.E.S. program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3416
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):2-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Judith Salmon Kaur
Author Affiliation
kaur.judith@mayo.edu
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):2-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses
Consumer Participation - methods
Female
Health Education - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - education - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Tobacco - adverse effects
United States
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Spirit of E.A.G.L.E.S. is a National Cancer Institute funded Special Populations Network. Prior to its inception, there was limited infrastructure available to American Indian and Alaska Native populations to support cancer control activities. METHODS: Awareness has been raised about the burden of cancer in this special population. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Changes have started to support truly comprehensive cancer control across the cancer care continuum and will drive future community-based, participatory action research.
PubMed ID
15916512 View in PubMed
Less detail