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Aboriginal children suffer while governments ignore Jordan's Principle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126413
Source
CMAJ. 2012 May 15;184(8):853
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2012
Author
Noni E MacDonald
Source
CMAJ. 2012 May 15;184(8):853
Date
May-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Delivery of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence
State Government
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Aug 14;177(4):321, 32317698813
PubMed ID
22392942 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal relations and sustainable forest management in Canada: the influence of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147560
Source
J Environ Manage. 2011 Feb;92(2):300-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Deborah McGregor
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography and Aboriginal Studies Program, University of Toronto, Room 5063, Sidney Smith Hall (100 St. George Street), Toronto, Ontario M5S3G3, Canada. d.mcgregor@utoronto.ca
Source
J Environ Manage. 2011 Feb;92(2):300-10
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Canada
Conservation of Natural Resources
Forestry - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This paper provides an overview of the emerging role of Aboriginal people in Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) in Canada over the past decade. The 1996 Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) provided guidance and recommendations for improving Aboriginal peoples' position in Canadian society, beginning with strengthening understanding and building relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal parties. This paper explores the extent to which advances in Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal relationships and Aboriginal forestry have been made as a result of RCAP's call for renewed relationships based on co-existence among nations. Such changes have begun to alter the context in which Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal relationships exist with respect to SFM. While governments themselves have generally not demonstrated the leadership called for by RCAP in taking up these challenges, industry and other partners are demonstrating some improvements. A degree of progress has been achieved in terms of lands and resources, particularly with co-management-type arrangements, but a fundamental re-structuring needed to reflect nation-to-nation relationships has not yet occurred. Other factors related to increasing Aboriginal participation in SFM, such as the recognition of Aboriginal and treaty rights, are also highlighted, along with suggestions for moving Aboriginal peoples' SFM agenda forward in the coming years.
PubMed ID
19889497 View in PubMed
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Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284320
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Geary J1, Jardine CG, Guebert J, Bubela T.
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Date
2013
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to Information/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/organization & administration
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations/legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Financing, Government
Genetics, Medical/legislation & jurisprudence
Genetics, Medical/organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Indians, North American/ethnology
Indians, North American/genetics
Indians, North American/legislation & jurisprudence
Documents
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Alaska native dental health initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84126
Source
LDA J. 2006;65(4):24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

And justice for all? Aboriginal victims of sexual violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156836
Source
Violence Against Women. 2008 Jun;14(6):678-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Arielle Dylan
Cheryl Regehr
Ramona Alaggia
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2008 Jun;14(6):678-96
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Police - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Social Responsibility
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
Concern for the recognition, support, and rights of victims within the criminal justice system has grown in recent years, leading to legislative and procedural changes in the administration of justice that have improved the experiences of victims. What is not clear is whether all victims have benefited from changes in the system regardless of race and social class. This study investigates the experiences Aboriginal people who are victims of sexual violence have with the Canadian criminal justice system. The authors seek to explore perspectives about their encounters with the judicial system from the point of first contact with the police through involvement with the court and community service providers, utilizing grounded theory qualitative methodology. They conclude that race is a key determinant in the manner in which a victim will be perceived by the people in the justice system and the manner in which the victim will approach the judicial process.
PubMed ID
18535308 View in PubMed
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Continuum of readiness for collaboration, ICWA compliance, and reducing disproportionality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115996
Source
Child Welfare. 2012;91(3):65-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tom Lidot
Rose-Margaret Orrantia
Miryam J Choca
Author Affiliation
American Indian Enhancement Project.
Source
Child Welfare. 2012;91(3):65-87
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Child
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Healthcare Disparities - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Minority Groups - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Social Work - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
From 2008-2010, a California Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) addressed the disproportionality of African American and American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children in public child welfare services in partnership with the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Casey Family Program, the Child and Family Policy Institute of California, and the California Department of Social Services. The result was the development of the Continuum of Readiness, to be utilized by California counties to make strategic decisions to achieve Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) compliance and address AI/AN dis-proportionality through collaboration with tribes and urban Indian communities.
PubMed ID
23444790 View in PubMed
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Couples Counseling for Aboriginal Clients Following Intimate Partner Violence: Service Providers' Perceptions of Risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281424
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2016 Feb;60(3):286-307
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Elissa Riel
Sue Languedoc
Jason Brown
Julie Gerrits
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2016 Feb;60(3):286-307
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Couples Therapy - legislation & jurisprudence
Cultural Competency
Family Therapy - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Intimate Partner Violence - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Inuits - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Assessment - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Interventions for family violence in Aboriginal communities should take a culture-based approach and focus on healing for the whole family. The purpose of this research was to identify risk issues from the perspective of service providers for couples counseling with Aboriginal clients following intimate partner violence. A total of 25 service providers participated in over the phone interviews concerning risk with Aboriginal men in couple counseling. Five concepts emerged including (a) collaterals, (b) commitment to change, (c) violence, (d) mind-set, and (e) mental health. It was concluded that culturally competent interventions should involve the entire community and have a restorative approach. The concepts were compared and contrasted with the available literature.
PubMed ID
25274747 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.