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Access to cardiac rehabilitation among South-Asian patients by referral method: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143716
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;35(3):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Keerat Grewal
Yvonne W Leung
Parissa Safai
Donna E Stewart
Sonia Anand
Milan Gupta
Cynthia Parsons
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, ON. keerat.grewal@utoronto.ca
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;35(3):106-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - ethnology - rehabilitation
Asia, Western - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Automation
Continuity of Patient Care
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
People of South-Asian origin have an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease. Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is effective, South Asians are among the least likely people to participate in these programs. Automatic referral increases CR use and may reduce access inequalities. This study qualitatively explored whether CR referral knowledge and access varied among South-Asian patients. Participants were South-Asian cardiac patients receiving treatment at hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Each hospital refers to CR via one offour methods: automatically through paper or electronically, through discussion with allied health professionals (liaison referral), or through referral at the physician's discretion. Data were collected via interviews and analyzed using interpretive-descriptive analysis. Four themes emerged: the importance of predischarge CR discussions with healthcare providers, limited knowledge of CR, ease of the referral process for facilitators of CR attendance, and participants'needs for personal autonomy regarding their decision to attend CR. Liaison referral was perceived to be the most suitable referral method for participants. It facilitated communication between patients and providers, ensuring improved understanding of CR. Automatic referral may not be as well suited to this population because of reduced patient-provider communication.
PubMed ID
20450019 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and socialization: voices of internationally educated nurses in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77756
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Sochan A.
Singh M D
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, York University, York, Canada. asochan@yorku.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
China - ethnology
Communication
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Professional, Retraining
Emigration and Immigration
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Philippines - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Socialization
Ukraine - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This paper describes a study that explores the experiences of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in their efforts to gain entry to practice as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. AIM: The aim was to uncover, in part, the issues related to professional nursing credentialling. METHODS: This study was guided by a biographical narrative (qualitative) research methodology. A convenience sample of 12 IEN students volunteered for this study representing the Philippines, Mainland China, Korea, Ukraine and India. FINDINGS: The findings were that the IENs progress through a three-phase journey in their quest for licensure in Ontario. These phases include: (1) hope - wanting the Canadian dream of becoming an RN in Ontario; (2) disillusionment - discovering that their home-country nursing qualifications do not meet Ontario RN entry to practice; and (3) navigating disillusionment - living the redefined Canadian dream by returning to nursing school to upgrade their nursing qualifications. CONCLUSIONS: Professional regulatory nursing bodies and nursing educators, as well as practising nurses, must be aware of the potentially confusing and unpleasant processes IENs go through as they qualify for the privilege of practising nursing in Ontario.
PubMed ID
17492985 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of adopted foreign children at mid-adolescence as indicated by aspects of health and risk taking--a population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34075
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Dec;6(4):199-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
K. Berg-Kelly
J. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, East Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Dec;6(4):199-206
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adoption - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Family Health
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Social Adjustment
Social Behavior Disorders
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: There is very little data available on adaptation at adolescence after "visible adoptions" (children adopted from abroad), in terms of mental health, risk-taking and problem behaviour in comparison with nonadopted adolescents. This study describes such an outcome. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Data derived from self-reports from 125 adolescents aged 13-18 years who identified themselves as adopted, and who participated in two epidemiological surveys of 9329 adolescents. Their number was representative for children adopted from abroad. The other adolescents served as controls. RESULTS: Family life styles showed no differences between groups. Health was similar to that of the controls. Foreign adopted adolescents significantly often evaluated themselves as shorter and with early puberty. The proportion of adopted girls with suicidal thoughts was significantly larger, they also reported school truancy, not using safety belts, sexual intercourse, unpleasant sexual encounters, and contact with illicit drugs more often than the controls. The stress of early puberty could only partly explain this. CONCLUSIONS: Girls adopted from abroad, representing "visible adoptions", need additional attention and study during adolescence to expose causes for maladaption among some of them.
PubMed ID
9442998 View in PubMed
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An examination of the difference in performance of self-care behaviours between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery: a secondary analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138747
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(4):21-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Suzanne Fredericks
Joyce Lo
Sarah Ibrahim
Jennifer Leung
Author Affiliation
Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON. sfrederi@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(4):21-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
China - ethnology
Coronary Artery Bypass - nursing - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Patient Compliance - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The demographic profile of the patient receiving coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Canada has changed significantly over the past 20 years from mainly white (i.e., English, Irish, Scottish) to non-white (i.e., Indian or Chinese). To support individuals who have recently undergone a CABG procedure, patient education is provided to guide performance of self-care behaviours in the home environment. The relevance of this education, when applied to the current CABG surgery population, is questionable, as it was designed and tested using a white, homogenous sample. Thus, the number and type of self-care behaviours performed by persons of Indian and Chinese origin has not been investigated. These individuals may have varying self-care needs that are not reflected in the current self-care patient education materials.
The intent of this study was to examine the difference in the type and number of self-care behaviours performed between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery.
This study is a sub-study of a descriptive, exploratory design that included a convenience sample. Ninety-nine patients were recruited, representing three cultural groups (White, Indian, and Chinese). Descriptive data were used to describe the sample and identify specific self-care behaviours performed in the home environment.
Results indicate statistically significant differences between white and non-white individuals related to use of incentive spirometer (p = 0.04), deep breathing and coughing exercises (p = 0.04), and activity modification (p
PubMed ID
21141231 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Aug 24;81(13):17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-1993

Attitudes of urban South Africans towards drinking and drunkenness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12463
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1988 Jul;21(3):203-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1988
Author
L. Rocha-Silva
Author Affiliation
Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, Republic of South Africa.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1988 Jul;21(3):203-12
Date
Jul-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans - psychology
African Continental Ancestry Group
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages
Alcoholic Intoxication
Attitude
Cross-Cultural Comparison
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Iceland
India - ethnology
Mexico
Middle Aged
Ontario
Scandinavia
Scotland
South Africa
Work
Zambia
Abstract
The question of whether South Africans approve of drinking and drunkenness was researched. It seems that although they evaluate both drinking and drunkenness in general negatively, and particularly more negatively than for example Finns and Swedes do, substantial proportions accept drinking and drunkenness in certain situations, especially when these are of a non-work nature.
PubMed ID
3168763 View in PubMed
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Biopsy-defined adult celiac disease in Asian-Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184104
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2003 Jul;17(7):433-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Hugh James Freeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2003 Jul;17(7):433-6
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - etiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Celiac Disease - complications - ethnology - pathology
China - ethnology
Female
Humans
India - ethnology
Japan - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Celiac disease is thought to be a genetically based disorder reported mainly from European countries as well as countries to which Europeans have emigrated, including North America. This report documents a clinical experience of biopsy-defined celiac disease in 14 Asians diagnosed since 1988 in a single Canadian teaching hospital. Eleven were Indo-Canadians, including 10 of Punjabi descent. Other ethnic groups were also represented, including two Japanese and one Chinese patient. Abdominal pain was the most frequent presenting symptom. Anemia, particularly associated with a deficiency of iron was common, along with diarrhea and weight loss. Endoscopic studies documented lymphocytic gastric and colonic mucosal changes in over one-third of the cases while antibodies for tissue transglutaminase were positive in all patients tested. Dermatitis herpetiformis, diabetes mellitus and autoimmune liver disease were also documented. These findings indicate for the first time that adult celiac disease occurs in Asian populations living in North America, particularly in those of Punjabi descent.
PubMed ID
12915916 View in PubMed
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Chikungunya fever in Canada: fever and polyarthritis in a returned traveller.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104905
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Jul 8;186(10):772-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-2014
Author
Kevin L Schwartz
Aliyah Giga
Andrea K Boggild
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics (Schwartz), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.; Division of Infectious Diseases (Schwartz), The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont.; Workplace Safety and Insurance Board of Ontario (Giga), Toronto, Ont.; Tropical Disease Unit, Division of Infectious Diseases (Boggild), Department of Medicine, University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.; Laboratory Services (Boggild), Public Health Ontario, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Jul 8;186(10):772-4
Date
Jul-8-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alphavirus Infections - complications - ethnology
Arthritis - ethnology - etiology
Chikungunya virus
Female
Fever - ethnology - etiology
Humans
India - ethnology
Ontario - epidemiology
Travel
PubMed ID
24566646 View in PubMed
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[Children in Norway adopted from other countries. Physical and mental health during the adaptation period]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38743
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1987 Nov 10;107(31):2737-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1987

86 records – page 1 of 9.