Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2006 Sep;7(7):426-3116979086
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2007 Sep;59(6):591-60017727403
Cites: Res Gerontol Nurs. 2009 Jan;2(1):6-1120077988
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):793-80023701394
Cites: Clin Nurse Spec. 2013 Nov-Dec;27(6):298-30624107753
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2013 Nov;22(21-22):3032-4123815315
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Dec;61(12):2111-924479143
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;39(4):833-924296815
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2014 Aug;15(8):564-924814320
Cites: Physiother Theory Pract. 2010 May;26(4):226-3920397857
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2010 May;14(4):450-6020455121
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2010 Oct;19(19-20):2839-4820738451
Cites: Int J Older People Nurs. 2010 Sep;5(3):228-3420925706
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 2011 Sep;18(5):651-6121893576
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(3):378-9022250961
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(3):293-923323753
Cites: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-90123589097
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2007 Mar;11(2):119-3017453545
PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can we move beyond burden and burnout to support the health and wellness of family caregivers to persons with dementia? Evidence from British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132042
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Carole A Robinson
Susan Holtzman
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meredith.lilly@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - therapy
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After more than a decade of concerted effort by policy-makers in Canada and elsewhere to encourage older adults to age at home, there is recognition that the ageing-in-place movement has had unintended negative consequences for family members who care for seniors. This paper outlines findings of a qualitative descriptive study to investigate the health and wellness and support needs of family caregivers to persons with dementia in the Canadian policy environment. Focus groups were conducted in 2010 with 23 caregivers and the health professionals who support them in three communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Thematic analysis guided by the constant comparison technique revealed two overarching themes: (1) forgotten: abandoned to care alone and indefinitely captures the perceived consequences of caregivers' failed efforts to receive recognition and adequate services to support their care-giving and (2) unrealistic expectations for caregiver self-care relates to the burden of expectations for caregivers to look after themselves. Although understanding about the concepts of caregiver burden and burnout is now quite developed, the broader sociopolitical context giving rise to these negative consequences for caregivers to individuals with dementia has not improved. If anything, the Canadian homecare policy environment has placed caregivers in more desperate circumstances. A fundamental re-orientation towards caregivers and caregiver supports is necessary, beginning with viewing caregivers as a critical health human resource in a system that depends on their contributions in order to function. This re-orientation can create a space for providing caregivers with preventive supports, rather than resorting to costly patient care for caregivers who have reached the point of burnout and care recipients who have been institutionalised.
PubMed ID
21851447 View in PubMed
Less detail

Combined resistance and balance-jumping exercise reduces older women's injurious falls and fractures: 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273603
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Saija Karinkanta
Pekka Kannus
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Muscle strength
Odds Ratio
Postural Balance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Resistance Training
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
previously, a randomised controlled exercise intervention study (RCT) showed that combined resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB) improved physical functioning and bone strength. The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess whether this exercise intervention had long-lasting effects in reducing injurious falls and fractures.
five-year health-care register-based follow-up study after a 1-year, four-arm RCT.
community-dwelling older women in Finland.
one hundred and forty-five of the original 149 RCT participants; women aged 70-78 years at the beginning.
participants' health-care visits were collected from computerised patient register. An injurious fall was defined as an event in which the subject contacted the health-care professionals or was taken to a hospital, due to a fall. The rate of injured fallers was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, HR), and the rate of injurious falls and fractures by Poisson regression (risk ratio, RR).
eighty-one injurious falls including 26 fractures occurred during the follow-up. The rate of injured fallers was 62% lower in COMB group compared with the controls (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85). In addition, COMB group had 51% less injurious falls (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.98) and 74% less fractures (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.97).
home-dwelling older women who participated in a 12-month intensive multi-component exercise training showed a reduced incidence for injurious falls during 5-year post-intervention period. Reduction in fractures was also evident. These long-term effects need to be confirmed in future studies.
PubMed ID
25990940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community-dwelling older adults with memory loss: needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115614
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Mar;59(3):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Karen Parsons
Aimee Surprenant
Anne-Marie Tracey
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL A1B 3V6. karenp@mun.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Mar;59(3):278-85
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Family Practice
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Memory Disorders - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
To identify the health-related needs of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss.
Qualitative study using semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups.
A large community in Newfoundland.
Twenty-two adults between the ages of 58 and 80 years.
This needs assessment used a qualitative methodology of collecting and analyzing narrative data to develop an understanding of the issues, resources, and constraints of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss. Data were collected through semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using interpretive phenomenologic analysis.
Three constitutive patterns with relational themes and subthemes were identified: forgetting and remembering, normalizing yet questioning, and having limited knowledge of resources. Participants described many examples of how their daily lives were affected by forgetfulness. They had very little knowledge of resources that provided information or support. Most of the participants believed they could not discuss their memory problems with their family doctors.
It is important for older adults with mild memory loss to have access to resources that will assist them in understanding their condition and make them feel supported.
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2006 Sep;52(9):1108-917279222
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2005 Sep;9(5):430-4116024402
Cites: Int Psychogeriatr. 2008 Feb;20(1):77-8517565765
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2008 Jan;18(1):31-4218174533
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Feb;23(2):148-5417578843
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Apr;66(7):1509-2018222581
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;23(8):863-7118537198
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2008 Jul;12(4):444-5018791891
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1776-8318945531
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2009 May;55(5):508-9.e1-719439708
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Nov;48(11):1430-411083319
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Nov;48(11):1435-4111083320
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2001 Feb;49(2):134-4111207866
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2002 Jun;34(1):67-8512122774
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2002 Nov;50(11):1837-4312410903
Cites: ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1986 Apr;8(3):27-373083765
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1992;13:431-491599598
Cites: West J Nurs Res. 2007 Dec;29(8):976-9217984481
PubMed ID
23486801 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of the Finnish Alzheimer disease exercise trial (FINALEX): a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114708
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2013
Author
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Minna M Pöysti
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Niina Savikko
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of Primary Health Care, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@helsinki.fi
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Date
May-27-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - economics - therapy
Caregivers
Day Care - economics - organization & administration
Exercise Therapy - economics - methods - organization & administration
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
House Calls - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapists
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Few rigorous clinical trials have investigated the effectiveness of exercise on the physical functioning of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD).
To investigate the effects of intense and long-term exercise on the physical functioning and mobility of home-dwelling patients with AD and to explore its effects on the use and costs of health and social services.
A randomized controlled trial.
A total of 210 home-dwelling patients with AD living with their spousal caregiver.
The 3 trial arms included (1) group-based exercise (GE; 4-hour sessions with approximately 1-hour training) and (2) tailored home-based exercise (HE; 1-hour training), both twice a week for 1 year, and (3) a control group (CG) receiving the usual community care.
The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Short Physical Performance Battery, and information on the use and costs of social and health care services.
All groups deteriorated in functioning during the year after randomization, but deterioration was significantly faster in the CG than in the HE or GE group at 6 (P = .003) and 12 (P = .015) months. The FIM changes at 12 months were -7.1 (95% CI, -3.7 to -10.5), -10.3 (95% CI, -6.7 to -13.9), and -14.4 (95% CI, -10.9 to -18.0) in the HE group, GE group, and CG, respectively. The HE and GE groups had significantly fewer falls than the CG during the follow-up year. The total costs of health and social services for the HE patient-caregiver dyads (in US dollars per dyad per year) were $25,112 (95% CI, $17,642 to $32,581) (P = .13 for comparison with the CG), $22,066 in the GE group ($15,931 to $28,199; P = .03 vs CG), and $34,121 ($24,559 to $43,681) in the CG.
An intensive and long-term exercise program had beneficial effects on the physical functioning of patients with AD without increasing the total costs of health and social services or causing any significant adverse effects.
anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2013 Aug 20;159(4):JC1024026274
Comment In: MMW Fortschr Med. 2013 Nov 7;155(19):3224475662
Comment In: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):901-223588877
PubMed ID
23589097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease--a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140239
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kaisu H Pitkala
Minna M Raivio
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of General Practice, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, PO Box 20, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@kolumbus.fi
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - economics - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Caregivers
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Day Care - economics
Depression - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy - economics
Finland
Frail Elderly
Health Care Costs
Humans
Independent living
Mobility Limitation
Neuropsychological Tests
Postural Balance
Quality of Life
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Walking
Abstract
Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD) leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD.
During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210) living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1) tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2) group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3) control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36). Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up.
To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention.
ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 1988 Feb 1;23(3):271-843337862
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(5):373-833558716
Cites: Arch Neurol. 1991 Mar;48(3):278-812001185
Cites: J Gerontol. 1994 Mar;49(2):M85-948126356
Cites: Neurology. 1994 Dec;44(12):2308-147991117
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1996 Oct;77(10):1056-618857886
Cites: Neurology. 1997 May;48(5 Suppl 6):S10-69153155
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 1999 May;14(5):389-9710389044
Cites: Age Ageing. 2006 Jul;35(4):376-8116638761
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 2006 Oct;101(4):1237-4216778001
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007 Feb;55(2):158-6517302650
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2007 Jan-Feb;11(1):38-4817315079
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Aug 25;370(9588):657-6617720017
Cites: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2007 Oct-Nov;22(5):360-817959871
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2007 Nov;21(11):977-8617984150
Cites: Am J Manag Care. 2007 Dec;13 Suppl 8:S193-718095782
Cites: Int J Sports Med. 2008 Jun;29(6):471-418050054
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2008 Jun-Jul;12(6):401-918548179
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Sep 3;300(9):1027-3718768414
Cites: Alzheimers Dement. 2010 Mar;6(2):158-9420298981
Cites: Neurology. 1989 Sep;39(9):1159-652771064
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 2002 Nov;18(4):737-5712608501
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 May;51(5):636-4112752838
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Oct 15;290(15):2015-2214559955
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 Oct;85(10):1694-70415468033
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: Gerontologist. 1980 Dec;20(6):649-557203086
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1982 Jun;140:566-727104545
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1982-1983;17(1):37-497183759
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1989 Aug;37(8):725-92754157
PubMed ID
20925948 View in PubMed
Less detail

Geriatric and physically oriented rehabilitation improves the ability of independent living and physical rehabilitation reduces mortality: a randomised comparison of 538 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273948
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2015 Sep;29(9):892-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Antti Lahtinen
Juhana Leppilahti
Samppa Harmainen
Jaakko Sipilä
Riitta Antikainen
Maija-Liisa Seppänen
Reeta Willig
Hannu Vähänikkilä
Jukka Ristiniemi
Pekka Rissanen
Pekka Jalovaara
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2015 Sep;29(9):892-906
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - mortality - rehabilitation - surgery
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapy Modalities
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function - physiology
Treatment Outcome
Walking - physiology
Abstract
To examine effects of physical and geriatric rehabilitation on institutionalisation and mortality after hip fracture.
Prospective randomised study.
Physically oriented (187 patients), geriatrically oriented (171 patients), and health centre hospital rehabilitation (180 patients, control group).
A total of 538 consecutively, independently living patients with non-pathological hip fracture.
Patients were evaluated on admission, at 4 and 12 months for social status, residential status, walking ability, use of walking aids, pain in the hip, activities of daily living (ADL) and mortality.
Mortality was significantly lower at 4 and 12 months in physical rehabilitation (3.2%, 8.6%) than in geriatric rehabilitation group (9.6%, 18.7%, P=0.026, P=0.005, respectively) or control group (10.6%, 19.4%, P=0.006, P=0.004, respectively). At 4 months more patients in physical (84.4%) and geriatric rehabilitation group (78.0%) were able to live at home or sheltered housing than in control group (71.9%, P=0.0012 and P
PubMed ID
25452632 View in PubMed
Less detail

Glycemic control and health-related quality of life among older home-dwelling primary care patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293508
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anna-Kaisa Aro
Merja Karjalainen
Miia Tiihonen
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Maija Haanpää
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Rantakylä Health Center, Siunsote, Finland. Electronic address: koistine@student.uef.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mental health
Mental Status and Dementia Tests
Mobility Limitation
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional capacity in relation to glycemic control among older home-dwelling primary care patients.
Electronic patient records were used to identify 527 people over 65 years with diabetes. Of these, 259 randomly selected subjects were invited to a health examination and 172 of them attended and provided complete data. The participants were divided into three groups based on the HbA1c: good (HbA1c57mmol/mol (N=29)) glycemic control. HRQoL was measured with the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire. Functional and cognitive capacity and mental well-being were assessed with the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15).
EQ-5D scores for good, intermediate and poor glycemic control were 0.78; 0.74 and 0.70, p=0.037. Sub-items of mobility (p=0.002) and self-care were the most affected (p=0.031). Corresponding trend was found for IADL, p=0.008. A significant correlation was found between MMSE scores and HbA1c.
Older primary care home-dwelling patients with diabetes and poorer glycemic control have lower functional capacity and HRQoL, especially in regard to mobility and self-care.
PubMed ID
28754430 View in PubMed
Less detail

Home Help Service Staffs' Descriptions of Their Role in Promoting Everyday Activities Among Older People in Sweden Who Are Dependent on Formal Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299773
Source
J Appl Gerontol. 2017 08; 36(8):971-992
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Sara Cederbom
Charlotta Thunborg
Eva Denison
Anne Söderlund
Petra von Heideken Wågert
Author Affiliation
1 School of Healt, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
J Appl Gerontol. 2017 08; 36(8):971-992
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The study aimed to explore how home help service staff described their role in improving the abilities of older people, in particular, older women with chronic pain who are dependent on formal care, to perform everyday activities. Three focus group interviews were conducted, and a qualitative inductive thematic content analysis was used. The analysis resulted in one theme: struggling to improve the care recipients' opportunities for independence but being inhibited by complex environmental factors. By encouraging the care recipients to perform everyday activities, the staff perceived themselves to both maintain and improve their care recipients' independence and quality of life. An important goal for society and health care professionals is to improve older people's abilities to "age in place" and to enable them to age independently while maintaining their quality of life. A key resource is home help service staff, and this resource should be utilized in the best possible way.
PubMed ID
26209706 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.