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Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
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Aspects of housing and perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older people in three national samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113316
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Signe Tomsone
Vibeke Horstmann
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. Signe.Tomsone@med.lu.se
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Germany
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Latvia
Male
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
Good housing solutions are important for the ageing population in order to promote health and maintain functional ability. The objective of this study was to investigate whether and how objective and perceived aspects of housing were related to perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older, single-living people within three national samples.
The current study was based on national samples (German, n = 450; Latvian, n = 303; Swedish, n = 397) from the European ENABLE-AGE Project, using data on ADL dependence, perceived health, objective and perceived aspects of housing. Descriptive statistics, correlations and multivariate ordinal regression models were used to analyze the data.
The participants in the ADL dependent groups generally were older, had more functional limitations and perceived their health as poorer compared to ADL independent groups. With regard to perceived housing, usability as well as meaning of home indicators was often lower in the ADL dependent groups, housing satisfaction was at the same level while housing-related external control beliefs were higher. The differences among the national samples were highly significant for both ADL groups, for all variables except number of outdoor environmental barriers in the ADL independent groups. The relations between perceived health on one hand and objective and perceived aspects of housing on the other show great diversities among the ADL groups and the national samples.
The results serve to alert health care practitioners that it is important to draw attention to how older people perceive their housing situation and to the fact that different levels of functional independence demand different interventions.
PubMed ID
23740591 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to ageing among older Norwegian adults living in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283443
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-02-2017
Author
Mary H Kalfoss
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Date
May-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent living
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Attitudes toward ageing have powerful influences and impact older adults' own perception of health, quality of life and utilisation of health and social care services. This study describes attitudes to ageing among 490 Norwegian older adults living in the community who responded to The Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire. Results showed that in spite of physical changes and psychological losses, the attitudes of older adults support life acceptance with gained wisdom in feeling that there were many pleasant things about growing older and that their identity was not defined by their age. They demonstrated the ability to incorporate age-related changes within their identities and at the same time maintain a positive view of self. Although they acknowledged that old age represented a time of loss with decreasing physical independence, they meant that their lives had made a difference, they wanted to give a good example to younger persons and felt it was a privilege to grow old.
PubMed ID
28467243 View in PubMed
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Combined resistance and balance-jumping exercise reduces older women's injurious falls and fractures: 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273603
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Saija Karinkanta
Pekka Kannus
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Muscle strength
Odds Ratio
Postural Balance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Resistance Training
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
previously, a randomised controlled exercise intervention study (RCT) showed that combined resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB) improved physical functioning and bone strength. The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess whether this exercise intervention had long-lasting effects in reducing injurious falls and fractures.
five-year health-care register-based follow-up study after a 1-year, four-arm RCT.
community-dwelling older women in Finland.
one hundred and forty-five of the original 149 RCT participants; women aged 70-78 years at the beginning.
participants' health-care visits were collected from computerised patient register. An injurious fall was defined as an event in which the subject contacted the health-care professionals or was taken to a hospital, due to a fall. The rate of injured fallers was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, HR), and the rate of injurious falls and fractures by Poisson regression (risk ratio, RR).
eighty-one injurious falls including 26 fractures occurred during the follow-up. The rate of injured fallers was 62% lower in COMB group compared with the controls (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85). In addition, COMB group had 51% less injurious falls (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.98) and 74% less fractures (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.97).
home-dwelling older women who participated in a 12-month intensive multi-component exercise training showed a reduced incidence for injurious falls during 5-year post-intervention period. Reduction in fractures was also evident. These long-term effects need to be confirmed in future studies.
PubMed ID
25990940 View in PubMed
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Effects of the Finnish Alzheimer disease exercise trial (FINALEX): a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114708
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2013
Author
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Minna M Pöysti
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Niina Savikko
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of Primary Health Care, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@helsinki.fi
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Date
May-27-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - economics - therapy
Caregivers
Day Care - economics - organization & administration
Exercise Therapy - economics - methods - organization & administration
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
House Calls - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapists
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Few rigorous clinical trials have investigated the effectiveness of exercise on the physical functioning of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD).
To investigate the effects of intense and long-term exercise on the physical functioning and mobility of home-dwelling patients with AD and to explore its effects on the use and costs of health and social services.
A randomized controlled trial.
A total of 210 home-dwelling patients with AD living with their spousal caregiver.
The 3 trial arms included (1) group-based exercise (GE; 4-hour sessions with approximately 1-hour training) and (2) tailored home-based exercise (HE; 1-hour training), both twice a week for 1 year, and (3) a control group (CG) receiving the usual community care.
The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Short Physical Performance Battery, and information on the use and costs of social and health care services.
All groups deteriorated in functioning during the year after randomization, but deterioration was significantly faster in the CG than in the HE or GE group at 6 (P = .003) and 12 (P = .015) months. The FIM changes at 12 months were -7.1 (95% CI, -3.7 to -10.5), -10.3 (95% CI, -6.7 to -13.9), and -14.4 (95% CI, -10.9 to -18.0) in the HE group, GE group, and CG, respectively. The HE and GE groups had significantly fewer falls than the CG during the follow-up year. The total costs of health and social services for the HE patient-caregiver dyads (in US dollars per dyad per year) were $25,112 (95% CI, $17,642 to $32,581) (P = .13 for comparison with the CG), $22,066 in the GE group ($15,931 to $28,199; P = .03 vs CG), and $34,121 ($24,559 to $43,681) in the CG.
An intensive and long-term exercise program had beneficial effects on the physical functioning of patients with AD without increasing the total costs of health and social services or causing any significant adverse effects.
anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2013 Aug 20;159(4):JC1024026274
Comment In: MMW Fortschr Med. 2013 Nov 7;155(19):3224475662
Comment In: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):901-223588877
PubMed ID
23589097 View in PubMed
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Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease--a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140239
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kaisu H Pitkala
Minna M Raivio
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of General Practice, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, PO Box 20, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@kolumbus.fi
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - economics - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Caregivers
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Day Care - economics
Depression - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy - economics
Finland
Frail Elderly
Health Care Costs
Humans
Independent living
Mobility Limitation
Neuropsychological Tests
Postural Balance
Quality of Life
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Walking
Abstract
Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD) leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD.
During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210) living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1) tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2) group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3) control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36). Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up.
To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention.
ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20925948 View in PubMed
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Family members' strategies when their elderly relatives consider relocation to a residential home--adapting, representing and avoiding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121097
Source
J Aging Stud. 2012 Dec;26(4):495-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Maria Söderberg
Agneta Ståhl
Ulla Melin Emilsson
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Lund University, Sweden. Maria.Soderberg@soch.lu.se
Source
J Aging Stud. 2012 Dec;26(4):495-503
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude
Caregivers - psychology
Communication
Decision Making
Denial (Psychology)
Disability Evaluation
Female
Guilt
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interview, Psychological
Judgment
Male
Nursing Homes
Parent-Child Relations
Patient Selection
Personal Autonomy
Professional-Family Relations
Social Responsibility
Social Values
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this article is to reveal how family members act, react and reason when their elderly relative considers relocation to a residential home. Since family members are usually involved in the logistics of their elderly relative's relocation, yet simultaneously expected not to influence the decision, the focus is on how family members experience participation in the relocation process in a Swedish context. 17 family members are included in 27 open, semi-structured interviews and follow-up contacts. Prominent features in the findings are firstly the family members' ambition to tone down their personal opinions, even though in their minds their personal preferences are clear, and secondly, the family members' ambivalence about continuity and change in their everyday lives. Family members are found to apply the adapting, the representing, or the avoiding strategy, indirectly also influencing their interaction with the care manager. Siblings applied the adapting strategy, spouses the representing strategy, while family members in the younger generation at times switched between the strategies.
PubMed ID
22939546 View in PubMed
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Geriatric and physically oriented rehabilitation improves the ability of independent living and physical rehabilitation reduces mortality: a randomised comparison of 538 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273948
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2015 Sep;29(9):892-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Antti Lahtinen
Juhana Leppilahti
Samppa Harmainen
Jaakko Sipilä
Riitta Antikainen
Maija-Liisa Seppänen
Reeta Willig
Hannu Vähänikkilä
Jukka Ristiniemi
Pekka Rissanen
Pekka Jalovaara
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2015 Sep;29(9):892-906
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - mortality - rehabilitation - surgery
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapy Modalities
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function - physiology
Treatment Outcome
Walking - physiology
Abstract
To examine effects of physical and geriatric rehabilitation on institutionalisation and mortality after hip fracture.
Prospective randomised study.
Physically oriented (187 patients), geriatrically oriented (171 patients), and health centre hospital rehabilitation (180 patients, control group).
A total of 538 consecutively, independently living patients with non-pathological hip fracture.
Patients were evaluated on admission, at 4 and 12 months for social status, residential status, walking ability, use of walking aids, pain in the hip, activities of daily living (ADL) and mortality.
Mortality was significantly lower at 4 and 12 months in physical rehabilitation (3.2%, 8.6%) than in geriatric rehabilitation group (9.6%, 18.7%, P=0.026, P=0.005, respectively) or control group (10.6%, 19.4%, P=0.006, P=0.004, respectively). At 4 months more patients in physical (84.4%) and geriatric rehabilitation group (78.0%) were able to live at home or sheltered housing than in control group (71.9%, P=0.0012 and P
PubMed ID
25452632 View in PubMed
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Glycemic control and health-related quality of life among older home-dwelling primary care patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293508
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anna-Kaisa Aro
Merja Karjalainen
Miia Tiihonen
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Maija Haanpää
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Rantakylä Health Center, Siunsote, Finland. Electronic address: koistine@student.uef.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mental health
Mental Status and Dementia Tests
Mobility Limitation
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional capacity in relation to glycemic control among older home-dwelling primary care patients.
Electronic patient records were used to identify 527 people over 65 years with diabetes. Of these, 259 randomly selected subjects were invited to a health examination and 172 of them attended and provided complete data. The participants were divided into three groups based on the HbA1c: good (HbA1c57mmol/mol (N=29)) glycemic control. HRQoL was measured with the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire. Functional and cognitive capacity and mental well-being were assessed with the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15).
EQ-5D scores for good, intermediate and poor glycemic control were 0.78; 0.74 and 0.70, p=0.037. Sub-items of mobility (p=0.002) and self-care were the most affected (p=0.031). Corresponding trend was found for IADL, p=0.008. A significant correlation was found between MMSE scores and HbA1c.
Older primary care home-dwelling patients with diabetes and poorer glycemic control have lower functional capacity and HRQoL, especially in regard to mobility and self-care.
PubMed ID
28754430 View in PubMed
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Long-term use of benzodiazepines and related drugs among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270647
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cognition - drug effects
Comorbidity
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Prevalence
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use, especially long-term use, and associated factors among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). We utilized data from the MEDALZ-2005 cohort, which includes all community-dwelling individuals diagnosed with AD in Finland at the end of 2005 and matched comparison individuals without AD. Register-based data included prescription drug purchases, comorbidities, and hospital discharge diagnoses. In this study, 24,966 individuals with AD and 24,985 individuals without AD were included. During the 4-year follow-up, we found that 45% (N = 11,312) of individuals with AD and 38% (N = 9534) of individuals without AD used BZDRs. The prevalence of long-term (= 180 days) BZDR use was more common among individuals with AD (30%) than individuals without AD (26%). The median durations of the first long-term use periods of BZDRs were 1.5 and 2 years for individuals with and without AD, respectively. Factors associated with long-term BZDR use included female sex, AD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, coronary artery disease, and asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The high prevalence of long-term BZDR use among individuals with AD is especially a cause for concern because long-term use may further impair cognition and may be associated with serious adverse events.
PubMed ID
26011780 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.