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Active living among older Canadians: a time-use perspective over 3 decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116266
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jamie E L Spinney
Hugh Millward
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Geography, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Demography
Energy Metabolism
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Exertion
Prevalence
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This research uses four nationally representative samples of time diary data, spanning almost 30 yr, that are fused with energy expenditure information to enumerate the median daily duration of moderate or vigorous effort activity, quantify the prevalence of Canadians age 65 yr and older who are meeting recommended daily levels of physical activity, and explore the factors affecting rates of active living. Results indicate that 41.1% of older Canadians met recommended levels of physical activity in 1992, 40.6% in 1998, 43.5% in 2005, and 39.6% in 2010. Both rates of active living and daily duration of aerobic activity exhibit significant differences among sociodemographic groups, with age, sex, activity limitation, urban-rural, and season exhibiting the most significant influences. This study illustrates the potential for time diary data to provide detailed surveillance of physical activity patterns, active aging research, and program development, as well.
PubMed ID
23416414 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias in relation to mild hypokalaemia and prognosis in community dwelling middle-aged and elderly subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281049
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Nick Mattsson
Golnaz Sadjadieh
Preman Kumarathurai
Olav Wendelboe Nielsen
Lars Køber
Ahmad Sajadieh
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Atrial Premature Complexes - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Biomarkers - blood
Denmark
Disease-Free Survival
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Hypokalemia - blood - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Time Factors
Ventricular Premature Complexes - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Abstract
Severe hypokalaemia can aggravate arrhythmia tendency and prognosis, but less is known about risk of mild hypokalaemia, which is a frequent finding. We examined the associations between mild hypokalaemia and ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias and their prognosis.
Subjects from the cohort of the 'Copenhagen Holter Study' (n = 671), with no history of manifest cardiovascular (CV) disease or stroke, were studied. All had laboratory tests and 48-h ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The median follow-up was 6.3 years. p-Potassium was inversely associated with frequency of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) especially in combination with diuretic treatment (r = -0.22, P = 0.015). Hypokalaemia was not associated with supraventricular arrhythmias. Subjects at lowest quintile of p-potassium (mean 3.42, range 2.7-3.6 mmol/L) were defined as hypokalaemic. Cardiovascular mortality was higher in the hypokalaemic group (hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals: 2.62 (1.11-6.18) after relevant adjustments). Hypokalaemia in combination with excessive PVC worsened the prognosis synergistically; event rates: 83 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with both abnormalities, 10 and 15 per 1000 patient-year in those with one abnormality, and 3 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with no abnormality. One variable combining hypokalaemia with excessive supraventricular arrhythmias gave similar results in univariate analysis, but not after multivariate adjustments.
In middle-aged and elderly subjects with no manifest heart disease, mild hypokalaemia is associated with increased rate of ventricular but not supraventricular arrhythmias. Hypokalaemia interacts synergistically with increased ventricular ectopy to increase the risk of adverse events.
PubMed ID
26293625 View in PubMed
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An evaluation by elderly people living at home of the prepared meals distributed by their municipality - a study with focus on the Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264566
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2015 May;7(3):59-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Oleg Pajalic
Zada Pajalic
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2015 May;7(3):59-68
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Consumer Behavior
Female
Food Services
Home Care Services
Homebound Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent living
Male
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Prepared meals distributed by municipalities is a service to elderly people, or persons with health related impairments, who live in their own home, have difficulties preparing their own food and cannot meet their food requirements in any other way. This study aimed to provide a brief picture of how elderly people living at home perceive the food they receive through their municipal food service and what is important to them. The data was collected using questionnaires. 274 out of 276 participants answered the questionnaire (n=173 women 62% and n=101 man 37%). The data was analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The results showed that the elderly persons receiving meals through the service were often satisfied, especially with the size of the portions and the delivery time. Those who had been using the food delivery service for a longer time were not satisfied with the alternative dishes they were been offered. There was no significant difference between the views of either gender. Further, those who were receiving special food were, in general, unsatisfied with the meals delivered. Development of the food distribution service by systematic quality insurance and interactive knowledge exchange between the producers and consumers seems to be a way to promote a more holistic and individual adjusted service. Evaluation of the municipal FD service is a powerful tool that can contribute to the development of this service. The food service can be improved and consequently even the quality of life and health of its receivers. The present survey should be revisited and developed in order to detect differences between genders.
PubMed ID
25948451 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics and mortality risk in relation to obstructive and central sleep apnoea in community-dwelling elderly individuals: a 7-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125918
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Peter Johansson
Urban Alehagen
Eva Svanborg
Ulf Dahlström
Anders Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linkoping University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sleep
Sleep Apnea, Central - mortality - physiopathology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - mortality - physiopathology
Stroke Volume
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Time Factors
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
little is known about demographic and clinical characteristics associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) or central sleep apnoea (CSA) in community-dwelling elderly. We also examined these (OSA and CSA) associations to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality.
a total of 331 community-dwelling elderly aged 71-87 years underwent a clinical examination and one-night polygraphic recordings in their homes. Mortality data were collected after seven years.
a total of 55% had SDB, 38% had OSA and 17% had CSA. Compared with those with no SDB and OSA, more participants with CSA had a left ventricular ejection fraction 75 years does not appear to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease or mortality, whereas CSA might be a pathological marker of CVD and impaired systolic function associated with higher mortality.
PubMed ID
22440587 View in PubMed
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Combined resistance and balance-jumping exercise reduces older women's injurious falls and fractures: 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273603
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Saija Karinkanta
Pekka Kannus
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Muscle strength
Odds Ratio
Postural Balance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Resistance Training
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
previously, a randomised controlled exercise intervention study (RCT) showed that combined resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB) improved physical functioning and bone strength. The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess whether this exercise intervention had long-lasting effects in reducing injurious falls and fractures.
five-year health-care register-based follow-up study after a 1-year, four-arm RCT.
community-dwelling older women in Finland.
one hundred and forty-five of the original 149 RCT participants; women aged 70-78 years at the beginning.
participants' health-care visits were collected from computerised patient register. An injurious fall was defined as an event in which the subject contacted the health-care professionals or was taken to a hospital, due to a fall. The rate of injured fallers was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, HR), and the rate of injurious falls and fractures by Poisson regression (risk ratio, RR).
eighty-one injurious falls including 26 fractures occurred during the follow-up. The rate of injured fallers was 62% lower in COMB group compared with the controls (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85). In addition, COMB group had 51% less injurious falls (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.98) and 74% less fractures (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.97).
home-dwelling older women who participated in a 12-month intensive multi-component exercise training showed a reduced incidence for injurious falls during 5-year post-intervention period. Reduction in fractures was also evident. These long-term effects need to be confirmed in future studies.
PubMed ID
25990940 View in PubMed
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Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years--a prospective long-term follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264015
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Petra Pohl
Ellinor Nordin
Anders Lundquist
Ulrica Bergström
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Fall-related injuries in older people are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Self-reported fall events in the last year is often used to estimate fall risk in older people. However, it remains to be investigated if the fall frequency and the consequences of the falls have an impact on the risk for subsequent injurious falls in the long term. The objective of this study was to investigate if a history of one single non-injurious fall, at least two non-injurious falls, or at least one injurious fall within 12 months increases the risk of sustaining future injurious falls.
Community-dwelling individuals 75-93 years of age (n = 230) were initially followed prospectively with monthly calendars reporting falls over a period of 12 months. The participants were classified into four groups based on the number and type of falls (0, 1, =2 non-injurious falls, and =1 injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to a hospital emergency department). The participants were then followed for several years (mean time 5.0 years ±1.1) regarding injurious falls requiring a visit to the emergency department. The Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of injurious falls.
During the long-term follow-up period, thirty per cent of the participants suffered from at least one injurious fall. Those with a self-reported history of at least one injurious fall during the initial 12 months follow-up period showed a significantly higher risk for sustaining subsequent injurious falls in the long term (hazard ratio 2.78; 95% CI, 1.40-5.50) compared to those with no falls. No other group showed an increased risk.
In community-dwelling people over 75 years of age, a history of at least one self-reported injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to the emergency department within a period of 12 months implies an increased risk of sustaining future injurious falls. Our results support the recommendations to offer a multifactorial fall-risk assessment coupled with adequate interventions to community-dwelling people over 75 years who present to the ED due to an injurious fall.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25407714 View in PubMed
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Duration of new antidepressant use and factors associated with discontinuation among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300475
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Reetta Kettunen
Heidi Taipale
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Marjaana Koponen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To study how long antidepressants initiated after diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were used and factors associated with discontinuation of use among persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, differences in duration of use between the antidepressants groups were compared.
Register-based Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort included 70,718 community-dwelling people with AD who were diagnosed during the years 2005-2011. For this study, the new antidepressant users were included after 1-year washout period (N?=?16,501; 68.6% females, mean age 80.9). The duration of antidepressant use was modeled with the PRE2DUP method. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were assessed with Cox proportional hazard models and included age, gender, comorbid conditions and concomitant medications.
Median duration of the new antidepressant use period was 309 days (IQR 93-830). For selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use, the median duration was 331 days (IQR 101-829), for mirtazapine 202 days (IQR 52-635), and for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) 134 days (IQR 37-522). After 1-year follow-up, 40.8% had discontinued antidepressant use, 54.6% after 2 years and 64.1% after 3 years. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were age over 85, male gender, diabetes, and use of memantine, opioids, and antiepileptics whereas benzodiazepines and related drugs and antipsychotic use were inversely associated with discontinuation.
Antidepressants are used for long-term among people with AD. Need and indication for antidepressant use should be assessed regularly as evidence on their efficacy for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia is limited.
PubMed ID
30413841 View in PubMed
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Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease--a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140239
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kaisu H Pitkala
Minna M Raivio
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of General Practice, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, PO Box 20, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@kolumbus.fi
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - economics - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Caregivers
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Day Care - economics
Depression - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy - economics
Finland
Frail Elderly
Health Care Costs
Humans
Independent living
Mobility Limitation
Neuropsychological Tests
Postural Balance
Quality of Life
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Walking
Abstract
Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD) leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD.
During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210) living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1) tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2) group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3) control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36). Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up.
To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention.
ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20925948 View in PubMed
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Glycemic control and health-related quality of life among older home-dwelling primary care patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293508
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anna-Kaisa Aro
Merja Karjalainen
Miia Tiihonen
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Maija Haanpää
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Rantakylä Health Center, Siunsote, Finland. Electronic address: koistine@student.uef.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mental health
Mental Status and Dementia Tests
Mobility Limitation
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional capacity in relation to glycemic control among older home-dwelling primary care patients.
Electronic patient records were used to identify 527 people over 65 years with diabetes. Of these, 259 randomly selected subjects were invited to a health examination and 172 of them attended and provided complete data. The participants were divided into three groups based on the HbA1c: good (HbA1c57mmol/mol (N=29)) glycemic control. HRQoL was measured with the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire. Functional and cognitive capacity and mental well-being were assessed with the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15).
EQ-5D scores for good, intermediate and poor glycemic control were 0.78; 0.74 and 0.70, p=0.037. Sub-items of mobility (p=0.002) and self-care were the most affected (p=0.031). Corresponding trend was found for IADL, p=0.008. A significant correlation was found between MMSE scores and HbA1c.
Older primary care home-dwelling patients with diabetes and poorer glycemic control have lower functional capacity and HRQoL, especially in regard to mobility and self-care.
PubMed ID
28754430 View in PubMed
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The impact of social vulnerability on the survival of the fittest older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127519
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):161-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Melissa K Andrew
Arnold Mitnitski
Susan A Kirkland
Kenneth Rockwood
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. mandrew@dal.ca
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):161-5
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Physical Fitness
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
even older adults who are fit experience adverse health outcomes; understanding their risks for adverse outcomes may offer insight into ambient population health. Here, we evaluated mortality risk in relation to social vulnerability among the fittest older adults in a representative community-dwelling sample of older Canadians.
in this secondary analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, participants (n = 5,703) were aged 70+ years at baseline. A frailty index was used to grade relative levels of fitness/frailty, using 31 self-reported health deficits. The analysis was limited to the fittest people (those reporting 0-1 health deficit). Social vulnerability was trichotomised from a social vulnerability scale, which consisted of 40 self-reported social deficits.
five hundred and eighty-four individuals had 0-1 health deficit. Among them, absolute mortality risk rose with increasing social vulnerability. In those with the lowest level of social vulnerability, 5-year mortality was 10.8%, compared with 32.5% for those with the highest social vulnerability (adjusted hazard ratio 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5-4.3, P = 0.001).
a 22% absolute mortality difference in the fittest older adults is of considerable clinical and public health importance. Routine assessment of social vulnerability by clinicians could have value in predicting the risk of adverse health outcomes in older adults.
PubMed ID
22287038 View in PubMed
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