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Active living among older Canadians: a time-use perspective over 3 decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116266
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jamie E L Spinney
Hugh Millward
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Geography, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Demography
Energy Metabolism
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Exertion
Prevalence
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This research uses four nationally representative samples of time diary data, spanning almost 30 yr, that are fused with energy expenditure information to enumerate the median daily duration of moderate or vigorous effort activity, quantify the prevalence of Canadians age 65 yr and older who are meeting recommended daily levels of physical activity, and explore the factors affecting rates of active living. Results indicate that 41.1% of older Canadians met recommended levels of physical activity in 1992, 40.6% in 1998, 43.5% in 2005, and 39.6% in 2010. Both rates of active living and daily duration of aerobic activity exhibit significant differences among sociodemographic groups, with age, sex, activity limitation, urban-rural, and season exhibiting the most significant influences. This study illustrates the potential for time diary data to provide detailed surveillance of physical activity patterns, active aging research, and program development, as well.
PubMed ID
23416414 View in PubMed
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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria causing urinary tract infections in the elderly living in nursing homes versus the elderly living at home: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269775
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mark Fagan
Morten Lindbæk
Nils Grude
Harald Reiso
Maria Romøren
Dagfinn Skaare
Dag Berild
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:98
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - classification - pharmacology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Escherichia coli Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Proteus Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Proteus mirabilis - drug effects
Sex Factors
Urinalysis - methods
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is a problem in nursing homes. Presumed urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common infection. This study examines urine culture results from elderly patients to see if specific guidelines based on gender or whether the patient resides in a nursing home (NH) are warranted.
This is a cross sectional observation study comparing urine cultures from NH patients with urine cultures from patients in the same age group living in the community.
There were 232 positive urine cultures in the NH group and 3554 in the community group. Escherichia coli was isolated in 145 urines in the NH group (64%) and 2275 (64%) in the community group. There were no clinically significant differences in resistance. Combined, there were 3016 positive urine cultures from females and 770 from males. Escherichia coli was significantly more common in females 2120 (70%) than in males 303 (39%) (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
26238248 View in PubMed
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The association between anemia and falls in community-living women and men aged 65 years and older from the fifth Tromsø Study 2001-02: a replication study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293028
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2017 12 27; 17(1):292
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-27-2017
Author
Laila Arnesdatter Hopstock
Elisabeth Bøe Utne
Alexander Horsch
Tove Skjelbakken
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037, Tromsø, Norway. laila.hopstock@uit.no.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2017 12 27; 17(1):292
Date
12-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Frailty - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Self Report
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Falls are common among elderly people, and the risk increase with age. Falls are associated with both health and social consequences for the patient, and major societal costs. Identification of risk factors should be investigated to prevent falls. Previous studies have shown anemia to be associated with increased risk of falling, but the results are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anemia and self-reported falls among community-living elderly people. The study is a replication of the study by Thaler-Kall and colleagues from 2014, who studied the association between anemia and self-reported falls among 967 women and men 65 years and older in the KORA-Age study from 2009.
We included 2441 participants (54% women) 65 years and older from the population-based Tromsø 5 Study 2001-2002. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between anemia (hemoglobin
Notes
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PubMed ID
29282000 View in PubMed
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Can we move beyond burden and burnout to support the health and wellness of family caregivers to persons with dementia? Evidence from British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132042
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Carole A Robinson
Susan Holtzman
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meredith.lilly@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - therapy
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After more than a decade of concerted effort by policy-makers in Canada and elsewhere to encourage older adults to age at home, there is recognition that the ageing-in-place movement has had unintended negative consequences for family members who care for seniors. This paper outlines findings of a qualitative descriptive study to investigate the health and wellness and support needs of family caregivers to persons with dementia in the Canadian policy environment. Focus groups were conducted in 2010 with 23 caregivers and the health professionals who support them in three communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Thematic analysis guided by the constant comparison technique revealed two overarching themes: (1) forgotten: abandoned to care alone and indefinitely captures the perceived consequences of caregivers' failed efforts to receive recognition and adequate services to support their care-giving and (2) unrealistic expectations for caregiver self-care relates to the burden of expectations for caregivers to look after themselves. Although understanding about the concepts of caregiver burden and burnout is now quite developed, the broader sociopolitical context giving rise to these negative consequences for caregivers to individuals with dementia has not improved. If anything, the Canadian homecare policy environment has placed caregivers in more desperate circumstances. A fundamental re-orientation towards caregivers and caregiver supports is necessary, beginning with viewing caregivers as a critical health human resource in a system that depends on their contributions in order to function. This re-orientation can create a space for providing caregivers with preventive supports, rather than resorting to costly patient care for caregivers who have reached the point of burnout and care recipients who have been institutionalised.
PubMed ID
21851447 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular biomarkers predict fragility fractures in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299736
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Madeleine Johansson
Fabrizio Ricci
Giuseppe Di Martino
Cecilia Rogmark
Richard Sutton
Viktor Hamrefors
Olle Melander
Artur Fedorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenomedullin - blood
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular System - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Correlation of Data
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
To assess the role of four biomarkers of neuroendocrine activation and endothelial dysfunction in the longitudinal prediction of fragility fractures.
We analysed a population-based prospective cohort of 5415 community-dwelling individuals (mean age, 68.9±6.2 years) enrolled in the Malmö Preventive Project followed during 8.1±2.9 years, and investigated the longitudinal association between C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-proAVP), C-terminal endothelin-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1), the mid-regional fragments of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and incident vertebral, pelvic and extremity fractures.
Overall, 1030 (19.0%) individuals suffered vertebral, pelvic or extremity fracture. They were older (70.7±5.8 vs 68.4±6.3 years), more likely women (46.9% vs 26.3%), had lower body mass index and diastolic blood pressure, were more often on antihypertensive treatment (44.1% vs 38.4%) and had more frequently history of fracture (16.3% vs 8.1%). Higher levels of MR-proADM (adjusted HR (aHR) per 1 SD: 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p
Notes
CommentIn: Heart. 2019 Mar;105(6):427-428 PMID 30361269
PubMed ID
30322844 View in PubMed
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Change in psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling people aged 75 years and older in Finland: repeated cross-sectional population studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134674
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Franciska Desplenter
Charlotte Caenen
Jolein Meelberghs
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
J Simon Bell
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Older people are at high risk of experiencing psychotropic-related adverse drug events. The objective of this study was to compare and contrast the use of psychotropic drugs among community-dwelling people aged = 75 years in 1998 and 2004.
Comparable random samples of people aged = 75 years were extracted from the population register in Kuopio, Finland, in 1998 (n = 700) and 2003 (n = 1000). In 1998 and 2004, 523 and 700 community-dwelling people respectively participated in nurse interviews, during which demographic, diagnostic and drug use data were elicited. Logistic regression was used to compute unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the prevalence of psychotropic drug use in 2004 compared to 1998.
The unadjusted prevalence of total psychotropic (37.3% and 38.4%, OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.83-1.33), anxiolytic, hypnotic and sedative (29.6% and 31.3%, OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.85-1.38), and antidepressant (10.7% and 11.9%, OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.78-1.61) use were similar in 1998 and 2004. There was a decrease in the unadjusted prevalence of antipsychotic use (9.2% and 5.7%, OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.39-0.93). After adjusting for socioeconomic and health status differences, there was an increase in the prevalence of total psychotropic (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.01-1.70) and antidepressant (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.06-2.40) use.
The unadjusted prevalence of psychotropic drug use remained stable between 1998 and 2004. However, in adjusted analyses there was a small increase in the prevalence of any psychotropic drug use and antidepressant use specifically.
PubMed ID
21554797 View in PubMed
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Community-level factors that contribute to First Nations and Inuit older adults feeling supported to age well in a Canadian city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300274
Source
J Aging Stud. 2019 Mar; 48:50-59
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Lauren A Brooks-Cleator
Audrey R Giles
Martha Flaherty
Author Affiliation
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, 420B Montpetit Hall, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada. Electronic address: Lbroo049@uottawa.ca.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2019 Mar; 48:50-59
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Cities
Female
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Quebec
Social Environment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Despite the proliferation of age-friendly cities in Canada that are intended to support older adults to age well, there are still many inequalities between groups of older adults, particularly, and of concern for this paper, between Indigenous older adults, who experience colonialism's ongoing impacts, and non-Indigenous older adults. A better understanding of factors that inform these inequalities will help in the development of policies and programs that better support Indigenous older adults to age well and, thus, will contribute to ameliorating the inequalities that they face. Using a community-based participatory research approach, informed by a postcolonial theoretical lens, in this paper we addressed the question, "what community-level factors contribute to Indigenous older adults (aged 55 years and over) feeling supported to age well in the city of Ottawa?" We specifically examined this question in relation to the age-friendly communities framework, which guides the City of Ottawa's Older Adult Plan. Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and photovoice with 32 First Nations and Inuit older adults revealed that the participants felt both supported and unsupported to age well. More specifically, there were two main areas in which they felt they could be better supported to age well: the social environment and physical environment. There were three subthemes within the social environment theme: responsive health and community support services, respect and recognition, and communication and information. Within the physical environment theme there were four subthemes: transportation, housing, accessibility, and gathering space. The results demonstrate that despite there being similarities in the areas that the participants felt they needed support and the areas on which the Older Adult Plan focuses, if the domains of aging well initiatives do not better account for the impacts of colonialism, it is unlikely that they will be effective in supporting Indigenous older adults' health and well-being.
PubMed ID
30832930 View in PubMed
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Comparison of predictors of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture in community-dwellers with and without Alzheimer's disease - exposure-matched cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283663
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):204
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology
Causality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Dementia, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) being the most common form, is a major hip fracture risk factor, but currently it is not known whether the same factors predict hip fracture among persons with and without dementia/AD. We compared the predictors of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture in persons with and without AD.
An exposure-matched cohort of all community-dwellers of Finland who received a new clinically verified AD diagnosis in 2005-2011 and had no history of previous hip fracture (N = 67,072) and an age, sex, and region-matched cohort of persons without AD (N = 67,072). Associations between sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities and medications and risk of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture were assessed with Cox regression.
As expected, the incidence of hip fractures in 2005-2012 (2.19/100 person-years vs 0.90/100 person-years in the non-AD cohort), as well as mortality after hip fracture (29/100 person-years vs 23/100 person-years in the non-AD cohort) were higher in the AD cohort. This difference was evident regardless of the risk factors. Mental and behavioural disorders (adjusted hazard ratio; HR 95% confidence interval CI: 1.16, 1.09-1.24 and 1.71, 1.52-1.92 in the AD and non-AD-cohorts), antipsychotics (1.12, 1.04-1.20 and 1.56, 1.38-1.76 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) and antidepressants (1.06, 1.00-1.12 and 1.34 1.22-1.47 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) were related to higher, and estrogen/combination hormone therapy (0.87, 0.77-0.9 and 0.79, 0.64-0.98 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) to lower hip fracture risk in both cohorts. Stroke (1.42, 1.26-1.62), diabetes (1.13, 0.99-1.28), active cancer treatment (1.67, 1.22-2.30), proton pump inhibitors (1.14, 1.05-1.25), antiepileptics (1.27, 1.11-1.46) and opioids (1.10, 1.01-1.19) were associated with higher hip fracture risk in the non-AD cohort. Similarly, the associations between mortality risk factors (age, sex, several comorbidities and medications) were stronger in the non-AD cohort.
AD itself appears to be such a significant risk factor for hip fracture, and mortality after hip fracture, that it overrules or diminishes the effect of other risk factors. Thus, it is important to develop and implement preventive interventions that are suitable and effective in this population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27908278 View in PubMed
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Comparison of Summer and Winter Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290965
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-21-2017
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Nina Dora Oskarsdottir
Robert J Brychta
Annemarie Koster
Dane R van Domelen
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Akureyri, Nordurslod 2, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. nanna@unak.is.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Date
10-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
In Iceland, there is a large variation in daylight between summer and winter. The aim of the study was to identify how this large variation influences physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Free living PA was measured by a waist-worn accelerometer for one week during waking hours in 138 community-dwelling older adults (61.1% women, 80.3 ± 4.9 years) during summer and winter months. In general, SB occupied about 75% of the registered wear-time and was highly correlated with age (ß = 0.36). Although the differences were small, more time was spent during the summer in all PA categories, except for the moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and SB was reduced. More lifestyle PA (LSPA) was accumulated in =5-min bouts during summer than winter, especially among highly active participants. This information could be important for policy makers and health professionals working with older adults. Accounting for seasonal difference is necessary in analyzing SB and PA data.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29065475 View in PubMed
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