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Active living among older Canadians: a time-use perspective over 3 decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116266
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jamie E L Spinney
Hugh Millward
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Geography, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Demography
Energy Metabolism
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Exertion
Prevalence
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This research uses four nationally representative samples of time diary data, spanning almost 30 yr, that are fused with energy expenditure information to enumerate the median daily duration of moderate or vigorous effort activity, quantify the prevalence of Canadians age 65 yr and older who are meeting recommended daily levels of physical activity, and explore the factors affecting rates of active living. Results indicate that 41.1% of older Canadians met recommended levels of physical activity in 1992, 40.6% in 1998, 43.5% in 2005, and 39.6% in 2010. Both rates of active living and daily duration of aerobic activity exhibit significant differences among sociodemographic groups, with age, sex, activity limitation, urban-rural, and season exhibiting the most significant influences. This study illustrates the potential for time diary data to provide detailed surveillance of physical activity patterns, active aging research, and program development, as well.
PubMed ID
23416414 View in PubMed
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Can we move beyond burden and burnout to support the health and wellness of family caregivers to persons with dementia? Evidence from British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132042
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Carole A Robinson
Susan Holtzman
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meredith.lilly@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - therapy
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After more than a decade of concerted effort by policy-makers in Canada and elsewhere to encourage older adults to age at home, there is recognition that the ageing-in-place movement has had unintended negative consequences for family members who care for seniors. This paper outlines findings of a qualitative descriptive study to investigate the health and wellness and support needs of family caregivers to persons with dementia in the Canadian policy environment. Focus groups were conducted in 2010 with 23 caregivers and the health professionals who support them in three communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Thematic analysis guided by the constant comparison technique revealed two overarching themes: (1) forgotten: abandoned to care alone and indefinitely captures the perceived consequences of caregivers' failed efforts to receive recognition and adequate services to support their care-giving and (2) unrealistic expectations for caregiver self-care relates to the burden of expectations for caregivers to look after themselves. Although understanding about the concepts of caregiver burden and burnout is now quite developed, the broader sociopolitical context giving rise to these negative consequences for caregivers to individuals with dementia has not improved. If anything, the Canadian homecare policy environment has placed caregivers in more desperate circumstances. A fundamental re-orientation towards caregivers and caregiver supports is necessary, beginning with viewing caregivers as a critical health human resource in a system that depends on their contributions in order to function. This re-orientation can create a space for providing caregivers with preventive supports, rather than resorting to costly patient care for caregivers who have reached the point of burnout and care recipients who have been institutionalised.
PubMed ID
21851447 View in PubMed
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Change in psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling people aged 75 years and older in Finland: repeated cross-sectional population studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134674
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Franciska Desplenter
Charlotte Caenen
Jolein Meelberghs
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
J Simon Bell
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Older people are at high risk of experiencing psychotropic-related adverse drug events. The objective of this study was to compare and contrast the use of psychotropic drugs among community-dwelling people aged = 75 years in 1998 and 2004.
Comparable random samples of people aged = 75 years were extracted from the population register in Kuopio, Finland, in 1998 (n = 700) and 2003 (n = 1000). In 1998 and 2004, 523 and 700 community-dwelling people respectively participated in nurse interviews, during which demographic, diagnostic and drug use data were elicited. Logistic regression was used to compute unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the prevalence of psychotropic drug use in 2004 compared to 1998.
The unadjusted prevalence of total psychotropic (37.3% and 38.4%, OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.83-1.33), anxiolytic, hypnotic and sedative (29.6% and 31.3%, OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.85-1.38), and antidepressant (10.7% and 11.9%, OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.78-1.61) use were similar in 1998 and 2004. There was a decrease in the unadjusted prevalence of antipsychotic use (9.2% and 5.7%, OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.39-0.93). After adjusting for socioeconomic and health status differences, there was an increase in the prevalence of total psychotropic (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.01-1.70) and antidepressant (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.06-2.40) use.
The unadjusted prevalence of psychotropic drug use remained stable between 1998 and 2004. However, in adjusted analyses there was a small increase in the prevalence of any psychotropic drug use and antidepressant use specifically.
PubMed ID
21554797 View in PubMed
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Community-level factors that contribute to First Nations and Inuit older adults feeling supported to age well in a Canadian city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300274
Source
J Aging Stud. 2019 Mar; 48:50-59
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Lauren A Brooks-Cleator
Audrey R Giles
Martha Flaherty
Author Affiliation
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, 420B Montpetit Hall, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada. Electronic address: Lbroo049@uottawa.ca.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2019 Mar; 48:50-59
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Cities
Female
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Quebec
Social Environment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Despite the proliferation of age-friendly cities in Canada that are intended to support older adults to age well, there are still many inequalities between groups of older adults, particularly, and of concern for this paper, between Indigenous older adults, who experience colonialism's ongoing impacts, and non-Indigenous older adults. A better understanding of factors that inform these inequalities will help in the development of policies and programs that better support Indigenous older adults to age well and, thus, will contribute to ameliorating the inequalities that they face. Using a community-based participatory research approach, informed by a postcolonial theoretical lens, in this paper we addressed the question, "what community-level factors contribute to Indigenous older adults (aged 55 years and over) feeling supported to age well in the city of Ottawa?" We specifically examined this question in relation to the age-friendly communities framework, which guides the City of Ottawa's Older Adult Plan. Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and photovoice with 32 First Nations and Inuit older adults revealed that the participants felt both supported and unsupported to age well. More specifically, there were two main areas in which they felt they could be better supported to age well: the social environment and physical environment. There were three subthemes within the social environment theme: responsive health and community support services, respect and recognition, and communication and information. Within the physical environment theme there were four subthemes: transportation, housing, accessibility, and gathering space. The results demonstrate that despite there being similarities in the areas that the participants felt they needed support and the areas on which the Older Adult Plan focuses, if the domains of aging well initiatives do not better account for the impacts of colonialism, it is unlikely that they will be effective in supporting Indigenous older adults' health and well-being.
PubMed ID
30832930 View in PubMed
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Comparison of predictors of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture in community-dwellers with and without Alzheimer's disease - exposure-matched cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283663
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):204
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology
Causality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Dementia, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) being the most common form, is a major hip fracture risk factor, but currently it is not known whether the same factors predict hip fracture among persons with and without dementia/AD. We compared the predictors of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture in persons with and without AD.
An exposure-matched cohort of all community-dwellers of Finland who received a new clinically verified AD diagnosis in 2005-2011 and had no history of previous hip fracture (N = 67,072) and an age, sex, and region-matched cohort of persons without AD (N = 67,072). Associations between sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities and medications and risk of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture were assessed with Cox regression.
As expected, the incidence of hip fractures in 2005-2012 (2.19/100 person-years vs 0.90/100 person-years in the non-AD cohort), as well as mortality after hip fracture (29/100 person-years vs 23/100 person-years in the non-AD cohort) were higher in the AD cohort. This difference was evident regardless of the risk factors. Mental and behavioural disorders (adjusted hazard ratio; HR 95% confidence interval CI: 1.16, 1.09-1.24 and 1.71, 1.52-1.92 in the AD and non-AD-cohorts), antipsychotics (1.12, 1.04-1.20 and 1.56, 1.38-1.76 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) and antidepressants (1.06, 1.00-1.12 and 1.34 1.22-1.47 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) were related to higher, and estrogen/combination hormone therapy (0.87, 0.77-0.9 and 0.79, 0.64-0.98 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) to lower hip fracture risk in both cohorts. Stroke (1.42, 1.26-1.62), diabetes (1.13, 0.99-1.28), active cancer treatment (1.67, 1.22-2.30), proton pump inhibitors (1.14, 1.05-1.25), antiepileptics (1.27, 1.11-1.46) and opioids (1.10, 1.01-1.19) were associated with higher hip fracture risk in the non-AD cohort. Similarly, the associations between mortality risk factors (age, sex, several comorbidities and medications) were stronger in the non-AD cohort.
AD itself appears to be such a significant risk factor for hip fracture, and mortality after hip fracture, that it overrules or diminishes the effect of other risk factors. Thus, it is important to develop and implement preventive interventions that are suitable and effective in this population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27908278 View in PubMed
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Examining the relationship between communities' 'age-friendliness' and life satisfaction and self-perceived health in rural Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256516
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2594
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Verena H Menec
Scott Nowicki
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. verena.menec@med.umanitoba.ca.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2594
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Manitoba
Personal Satisfaction
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Transportation
Abstract
Population aging is a worldwide phenomenon. As a response, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the concept of 'age-friendliness' in 2006. Age-friendliness is defined in terms of a range of domains, such as housing, opportunities for participation, and transportation. Communities that accommodate the needs of older adults in these domains will, it is thought, promote healthy, active aging. The purpose of the present study was to examine communities' age-friendliness and its relationship to health-related outcomes in a rural context.
The study included 29 communities located in Manitoba, a mid-Western Canadian province, that are part of the Province of Manitoba's Age-Friendly Manitoba Initiative. As part of a needs assessment process in these communities, 593 individuals, including seniors and younger adults, completed an Age-Friendly Survey. The survey was designed to measure a variety of features in seven domains (the physical environment, housing options, the social environment, opportunities for participation, community supports and healthcare services, transportation options, and communication and information), as well as containing measures of life satisfaction and self-perceived health. Community characteristics were derived from census data. Moreover, communities were categorized on a rural-urban continuum.
Multi-level regressions indicated that an overall Age-Friendly Index was positively related to both life satisfaction (b=0.019, p
PubMed ID
24437338 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with hospitalization risk among community living middle aged and older persons: Results from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284013
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Sep-Oct;66:102-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jenny Hallgren
Eleonor I Fransson
Ingemar Kåreholt
Chandra A Reynolds
Nancy L Pedersen
Anna K Dahl Aslan
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Sep-Oct;66:102-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent living
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aims of the present study were to: (1) describe and compare individual characteristics of hospitalized and not hospitalized community living persons, and (2) to determine factors that are associated with hospitalization risk over time. We conducted a prospective study with a multifactorial approach based on the population-based longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). A total of 772 Swedes (mean age at baseline 69.7 years, range 46-103, 59.8% females) answered a postal questionnaire about physical and psychological health, personality and socioeconomic factors. During nine years of follow-up, information on hospitalizations and associated diagnoses were obtained from national registers. Results show that 484 persons (63%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up period. The most common causes of admission were cardiovascular diseases (25%) and tumors (22%). Cox proportional hazard regression models controlling for age, sex and dependency within twin pairs, showed that higher age (HR=1.02, p
PubMed ID
27281475 View in PubMed
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The impact of social vulnerability on the survival of the fittest older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127519
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):161-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Melissa K Andrew
Arnold Mitnitski
Susan A Kirkland
Kenneth Rockwood
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. mandrew@dal.ca
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):161-5
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Physical Fitness
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
even older adults who are fit experience adverse health outcomes; understanding their risks for adverse outcomes may offer insight into ambient population health. Here, we evaluated mortality risk in relation to social vulnerability among the fittest older adults in a representative community-dwelling sample of older Canadians.
in this secondary analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, participants (n = 5,703) were aged 70+ years at baseline. A frailty index was used to grade relative levels of fitness/frailty, using 31 self-reported health deficits. The analysis was limited to the fittest people (those reporting 0-1 health deficit). Social vulnerability was trichotomised from a social vulnerability scale, which consisted of 40 self-reported social deficits.
five hundred and eighty-four individuals had 0-1 health deficit. Among them, absolute mortality risk rose with increasing social vulnerability. In those with the lowest level of social vulnerability, 5-year mortality was 10.8%, compared with 32.5% for those with the highest social vulnerability (adjusted hazard ratio 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5-4.3, P = 0.001).
a 22% absolute mortality difference in the fittest older adults is of considerable clinical and public health importance. Routine assessment of social vulnerability by clinicians could have value in predicting the risk of adverse health outcomes in older adults.
PubMed ID
22287038 View in PubMed
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Life habits performance of individuals with brain injury in different living environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116565
Source
Brain Inj. 2013;27(2):135-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Marie-Eve Lamontagne
Frederique Poncet
Emmanuelle Careau
Marie-Josée Sirois
Normand Boucher
Author Affiliation
Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration (CIRRIS), Québec, Canada. lamontagne_marie@hotmail.com
Source
Brain Inj. 2013;27(2):135-44
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Adjustment
Social Participation
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Little is known about variations in social participation among individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) living in different environments.
To examine the social participation of individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI across various living arrangements.
One hundred and thirty-six individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI, living either in natural settings (e.g. home), intermediate settings (e.g. group homes or foster families) or structured settings (e.g. nursing home or long-term care facilities) and requiring daily assistance, were interviewed using the LIFE-H tool, which measures the level of difficulty and the assistance required to carry out life habits and resulting social participation. Participation in six categories of life habits pertaining to Activities of Daily Living and five categories pertaining to Social Roles were examined.
The level of difficulty and the assistance required to carry out the life habits and the overall level of social participation were associated with living arrangements. Participation scores in Activities of Daily Living varied across living arrangements while Social Roles scores did not.
Living arrangements (such as intermediate settings) may better support social participation in individuals with TBI. There is a need to further study the issue of living arrangements as they seem to facilitate the performance of life habits, which impacts the social participation of individuals with TBI.
PubMed ID
23384212 View in PubMed
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Not ageing in place: Negotiating meanings of residency in age-related housing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275775
Source
J Aging Stud. 2015 Dec;35:55-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Paula Vasara
Source
J Aging Stud. 2015 Dec;35:55-64
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Choice Behavior
Female
Finland
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Male
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This article explores the experience of residing in age-related housing. The focus is on the negotiations around the multiple meanings assigned to place of residency among older people - in a situation where the official policy objectives of growing old in one's own home are not achieved.
Narrative analysis is employed to study the experiences of older people aged 75 or older living in special types of housing due to actual or anticipated difficulties associated with age. The interviews are part of a larger body of data gathered in MOVAGE Moving in Old Age: Transitions in Housing and Care research project.
The storyworld was structured by the romantic canonical narrative associated with the policy of 'ageing in place'; growing old at home is idealised and moving is constructed as a disruption. This breach was resolved through explaining deviance from canonical expectations by causes constructed as legitimate, through encountering trouble by constructing oneself as a non-typical resident, and through creating counter stories of natural transitions and choices. As a result, despite the commonly negative meanings associated with the residency in age-related housing, positive storylines respecting values embedded in the canonical narratives of home and endurance were achieved.
A living environment that is experienced as suitable, and that has adequate formal help available, supports and enables wellbeing and independence. This is true within age-related housing as well as in other forms. Thus, even though the important meaning of a long-term home should continue to be acknowledged, various other kinds of forms of housing should be made available in order to enhance older people's sense of security and feeling that they are autonomous, independent agents in their everyday life in accordance with their subjective life experiences.
PubMed ID
26568215 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.