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Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
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The association between anemia and falls in community-living women and men aged 65 years and older from the fifth Tromsø Study 2001-02: a replication study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293028
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2017 12 27; 17(1):292
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-27-2017
Author
Laila Arnesdatter Hopstock
Elisabeth Bøe Utne
Alexander Horsch
Tove Skjelbakken
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037, Tromsø, Norway. laila.hopstock@uit.no.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2017 12 27; 17(1):292
Date
12-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Frailty - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Self Report
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Falls are common among elderly people, and the risk increase with age. Falls are associated with both health and social consequences for the patient, and major societal costs. Identification of risk factors should be investigated to prevent falls. Previous studies have shown anemia to be associated with increased risk of falling, but the results are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anemia and self-reported falls among community-living elderly people. The study is a replication of the study by Thaler-Kall and colleagues from 2014, who studied the association between anemia and self-reported falls among 967 women and men 65 years and older in the KORA-Age study from 2009.
We included 2441 participants (54% women) 65 years and older from the population-based Tromsø 5 Study 2001-2002. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between anemia (hemoglobin
Notes
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PubMed ID
29282000 View in PubMed
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Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
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Differences between self-reported and observed physical functioning in independent older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262880
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2014;36(17):1395-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rona Feuering
Elisha Vered
Talma Kushnir
Alan M Jette
Itshak Melzer
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2014;36(17):1395-401
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Male
Self Report
Abstract
Understanding whether there is an agreement between older persons who provide information on their functional status and clinicians who assess their function is an important step in the process of creating sound outcome instruments.
To examine whether there is agreement between self-reported and clinician assessment of similar performance items in older adults.
Fifty independent older adults aged 70-91 years (mean age 80.3?±?5.2 years) who live in the community were examined separately and blindly in two data collection sessions. Self-reported and observed lower and upper extremity physical tasks were compared. Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) was used in both sessions. We performed intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) as indices of agreement and "mountain plots" that were based on a cumulative distribution curve. Associations between self-reported and observed function with Fear of Fall Scale (FES) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were also assessed.
ICCs were high between self-reported lower extremity function and observed lower extremity function (ICC?=?0.83), and were poorer for self-reported and observed upper extremity function (ICC?=?0.31). In both comparisons, mountain plots revealed a right shift that was larger for upper than lower extremity functions, indicating systematic differences in self-reported and observed assessments. Associations with FES and GDS were higher for self-reported than observed function.
There is a systematic bias between self-reported and clinician observation. Professionals should be aware that information provided by patients and observation of activity assessed by clinicians could differ substantially, especially for upper extremity function. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a systematic bias between self-reported and clinician assessment of similar performance items in older adults. In general, older adults overestimate their physical function or clinicians underestimate older adults function. The bias between self-reported and clinician assessment for upper extremity function is larger than that for lower extremity function. The conclusions regarding agreement across upper extremity and lower extremity function scores are not different when using mountain plots graphs versus relying solely on the value of the ICCs. However, the graphs expand our understanding of the direction and magnitude of score differences. Professionals should be aware that information provided by patients and assessment by clinicians could differ substantially, especially for upper extremity function.
PubMed ID
24001263 View in PubMed
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Heterogeneity of Characteristics among Housing Adaptation Clients in Sweden--Relationship to Participation and Self-Rated Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275389
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Björg Thordardottir
Carlos Chiatti
Lisa Ekstam
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the paper was to explore the heterogeneity among housing adaptation clients. Cluster analysis was performed using baseline data from applicants in three Swedish municipalities. The analysis identified six main groups: "adults at risk of disability", "young old with disabilities", "well-functioning older adults", "frail older adults", "frail older with moderate cognitive impairments" and "resilient oldest old". The clusters differed significantly in terms of participation frequency and satisfaction in and outside the home as well as in terms of self-rated health. The identification of clusters in a heterogeneous sample served the purpose of finding groups with different characteristics, including participation and self-rated health which could be used to facilitate targeted home-based interventions. The findings indicate that housing adaptions should take person/environment/activity specific characteristics into consideration so that they may fully serve the purpose of facilitating independent living, as well as enhancing participation and health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26729145 View in PubMed
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Longitudinal changes in quality of life among elderly people with and without dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301778
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 11; 30(11):1607-1618
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-2018
Author
A E Ydstebø
S Bergh
G Selbæk
J Šaltyte Benth
K Brønnick
C Vossius
Author Affiliation
Centre for Age-related Medicine,Stavanger University Hospital,Stavanger,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 11; 30(11):1607-1618
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - complications - psychology
Depression - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Proxy
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
ABSTRACTObjective:To study longitudinal changes in the quality of life (QoL) in persons with and without dementia, and explore the factors associated with baseline QoL and changes of QoL over the follow-up period.
Prospective longitudinal study.
Data were collected from 17 municipalities in Norway in the period from January 2009 to August 2012. A total of 412 persons were included, 254 (61.7 %) persons without dementia and 158 (38.3 %) with dementia at baseline.
Persons 70 years of age or older, receiving municipal care services. Main outcome measures include the following: self-rated and proxy-rated QoL over a period of 18 months, cognitive status, functional status, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and demographics.
Longitudinal changes in QoL were small, despite changes in clinical variables. Proxy ratings of patients QoL were lower than the patients' own ratings. Belonging to a group with low QoL trajectory was associated with symptoms of depression, reduced physical and instrumental functioning, and more severe dementia.
Patients and proxies evaluated the patients' QoL differently and QoL did not necessarily correspond with deterioration in clinical parameters. To prevent impaired QoL, we need to address identified factors and keep an approach open to the individual perceptions of QoL.
PubMed ID
29747721 View in PubMed
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Nature diversity and well-being in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294458
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2018 May; 30(5):527-532
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2018
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Kirsi E Keskinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Gerontology Research Center, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv), 40014, Jyvaskyla, Finland. merja.rantakokko@jyu.fi.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2018 May; 30(5):527-532
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Quality of Life
Self Report
Abstract
The research aim was to study the associations of nature diversity with quality of life (QoL) and depressive symptoms among older people, and whether physical activity explains the associations.
Community-dwelling people aged 75-90 years (n?=?848) living in Central Finland were interviewed in their homes. QoL was assessed with a short version of the World Health Organization Quality-of-Life Assessment (range 0-130, higher score indicates better QoL) and depressive symptoms with the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (range 0-30, higher scores indicate more depressive symptoms). Self-reported physical activity was assessed by intensity and duration using a single question with seven response options ranging from mostly resting to competitive sports. Nature diversity (Shannon Diversity Index) was assessed objectively within a 500-m buffer around participants' homes using a geographic information system (GIS).
Mean QoL was 100.3 (SD 11.8) and mean CES-D 9.6 (SD 6.8). Those in the highest nature diversity tertile had better QoL than those in the lowest tertile (p?=?.022). Physical activity did not explain the association between nature diversity and QoL. Adjustment for health indicators did not change the results. Nature diversity was not associated with depressive symptoms.
A diverse environment, especially when this includes elements of nature, is associated with better QoL. Good quality of the green infrastructure and adding natural elements to residential areas may enhance well-being among community-dwelling older people.
PubMed ID
28699000 View in PubMed
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Older women's personal goals and exercise activity: an 8-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103083
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Milla Saajanaho
Anne Viljanen
Sanna Read
Merja Rantakokko
Li-Tang Tsai
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Dept. of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Goals
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent living
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Report
Abstract
This study investigated the associations of personal goals with exercise activity, as well as the relationships between exercise-related and other personal goals, among older women. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used with a sample of 308 women ages 66-79 at baseline. Women who reported exercise-related personal goals were 4 times as likely to report high exercise activity at baseline than those who did not report exercise-related goals. Longitudinal results were parallel. Goals related to cultural activities, as well as to busying oneself around the home, coincided with exercise-related goals, whereas goals related to own and other people's health and independent living lowered the odds of having exercise-related goals. Helping older adults to set realistic exercise-related goals that are compatible with their other life goals may yield an increase in their exercise activity, but this should be evaluated in a controlled trial.
PubMed ID
23945665 View in PubMed
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Self-reported health problems and prioritized goals in community-dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296523
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2018 Nov 07; 50(10):872-878
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-07-2018
Author
Anestis Divanoglou
Marika Augutis
Thórarinn Sveinsson
Claes Hultling
Richard Levi
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. anestis.divanoglou@gmail.com.
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2018 Nov 07; 50(10):872-878
Date
Nov-07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Goals
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To explore self-reported health problems and functional goals in community-dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury in Sweden.
Cross-sectional descriptive study that used a survey designed by an experienced peer mentor with spinal cord injury.
Community-dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury from Sweden.
The survey was distributed online by the community peer-based organization RG Active Rehabilitation.
A total of 203 individuals (55% males, 90% acquired spinal cord injury) from all regions in Sweden completed the survey. Of these, 33% reported living with >?2 unbearable physical or psychological problems. While some problems (e.g. problems related to bladder and balance) were consistently ranked to be common across all years since injury and type of spinal cord injury, distribution of some other unbearable problems (e.g. type of pain, excessive weight) varied between subgroups. Years since injury, level of acquired spinal cord injury and sex, but not age-group or type of spinal cord injury, explained some of the variation in the goals.
The high proportion of reported "unbearable" problems point to the stronger need for systematic, comprehensive, life-long, multi-disciplinary follow-up for people with spinal cord injury. The high rate of goals related to improving strength and fitness across all participants independently of their characteristics highlight the important role of community organizations that offer such lifetime services.
PubMed ID
30225513 View in PubMed
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Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295075
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Mar; 32(1):290-298
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Anders Broström
Åke Wahlin
Urban Alehagen
Martin Ulander
Peter Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Mar; 32(1):290-298
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Fatigue - etiology
Female
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Self Report
Sex Factors
Sleep Wake Disorders - complications
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women.
Cross-sectional.
A community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7 years, SD 3.8 years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (=6 hours), n = 231; normal sleepers (7-8 hours), n = 338; and long sleepers (=9 hours), n = 61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects.
Depressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found.
Nurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.
PubMed ID
28574585 View in PubMed
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