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The average cost of pressure ulcer management in a community dwelling spinal cord injury population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123254
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Brian C Chan
Natasha Nanwa
Nicole Mittmann
Dianne Bryant
Peter C Coyte
Pamela E Houghton
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Care Costs
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Readmission - economics
Pilot Projects
Pressure Ulcer - economics - etiology - therapy
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - diagnosis - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common secondary complication experienced by community dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of literature on the health economic impact of PU in SCI population from a societal perspective. The objective of this study was to determine the resource use and costs in 2010 Canadian dollars of a community dwelling SCI individual experiencing a PU from a societal perspective. A non-comparative cost analysis was conducted on a cohort of community dwelling SCI individuals from Ontario, Canada. Medical resource use was recorded over the study period. Unit costs associated with these resources were collected from publicly available sources and published literature. Average monthly cost was calculated based on 7-month follow-up. Costs were stratified by age, PU history, severity level, location of SCI, duration of current PU and PU surface area. Sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Among the 12 study participants, total average monthly cost per community dwelling SCI individual with a PU was $4745. Hospital admission costs represented the greatest percentage of the total cost (62%). Sensitivity analysis showed that the total average monthly costs were most sensitive to variations in hospitalisation costs.
PubMed ID
22715990 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular biomarkers predict fragility fractures in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299736
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Madeleine Johansson
Fabrizio Ricci
Giuseppe Di Martino
Cecilia Rogmark
Richard Sutton
Viktor Hamrefors
Olle Melander
Artur Fedorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenomedullin - blood
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular System - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Correlation of Data
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
To assess the role of four biomarkers of neuroendocrine activation and endothelial dysfunction in the longitudinal prediction of fragility fractures.
We analysed a population-based prospective cohort of 5415 community-dwelling individuals (mean age, 68.9±6.2 years) enrolled in the Malmö Preventive Project followed during 8.1±2.9 years, and investigated the longitudinal association between C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-proAVP), C-terminal endothelin-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1), the mid-regional fragments of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and incident vertebral, pelvic and extremity fractures.
Overall, 1030 (19.0%) individuals suffered vertebral, pelvic or extremity fracture. They were older (70.7±5.8 vs 68.4±6.3 years), more likely women (46.9% vs 26.3%), had lower body mass index and diastolic blood pressure, were more often on antihypertensive treatment (44.1% vs 38.4%) and had more frequently history of fracture (16.3% vs 8.1%). Higher levels of MR-proADM (adjusted HR (aHR) per 1 SD: 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p
Notes
CommentIn: Heart. 2019 Mar;105(6):427-428 PMID 30361269
PubMed ID
30322844 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics and mortality risk in relation to obstructive and central sleep apnoea in community-dwelling elderly individuals: a 7-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125918
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Peter Johansson
Urban Alehagen
Eva Svanborg
Ulf Dahlström
Anders Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linkoping University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sleep
Sleep Apnea, Central - mortality - physiopathology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - mortality - physiopathology
Stroke Volume
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Time Factors
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
little is known about demographic and clinical characteristics associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) or central sleep apnoea (CSA) in community-dwelling elderly. We also examined these (OSA and CSA) associations to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality.
a total of 331 community-dwelling elderly aged 71-87 years underwent a clinical examination and one-night polygraphic recordings in their homes. Mortality data were collected after seven years.
a total of 55% had SDB, 38% had OSA and 17% had CSA. Compared with those with no SDB and OSA, more participants with CSA had a left ventricular ejection fraction 75 years does not appear to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease or mortality, whereas CSA might be a pathological marker of CVD and impaired systolic function associated with higher mortality.
PubMed ID
22440587 View in PubMed
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Impact of opioid initiation on antipsychotic and benzodiazepine and related drug use among persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300965
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 07; 30(7):947-956
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Aleksi Hamina
Piia Lavikainen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care,University of Eastern Finland,Kuopio,Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 07; 30(7):947-956
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Cognition - drug effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Interrupted Time Series Analysis
Male
Medication Adherence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacoepidemiology
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
ABSTRACTBackground:We analyzed the impact of opioid initiation on the prevalence of antipsychotic and benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
We utilized the register-based Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort for this study. We included all community-dwelling persons diagnosed with AD during 2010-2011 in Finland initiating opioid use (n = 3,327) and a matched cohort of persons not initiating opioids (n = 3,325). Interrupted time series analyses were conducted to compare the prevalence of antipsychotic and BZDR use in 30-day periods within six months before opioid initiation to 30-day periods six months later.
Before opioid initiation, prevalence of antipsychotic use among opioid initiators was 13.3%, 18.3% at opioid initiation, and 17.3% six months later. Prevalences of BZDR use were 27.1% six months prior, 28.9% at opioid initiation, and 26.9% six months later. After opioid initiation, antipsychotic and BZDR use declined by 0.3 percentage points (pps, 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.5) and 0.4 pps (0.2-0.7) per month, respectively, until the end of the follow-up. Compared to persons not initiating opioid use, opioid initiation immediately resulted in an increase in prevalence of 1.9 pps (0.9-2.8) for antipsychotics and of 1.6 pps (0.9-2.2) for BZDR use. However, in total there was a comparative decrease of 0.5 pps (0.3-0.8) per month for antipsychotics and of 0.4 pps (0.2-0.6) for BZDR use until the end of the follow-up.
Our results suggest that opioid initiation may reduce antipsychotic and BZDR use among persons with AD.
PubMed ID
29559009 View in PubMed
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The impact of social vulnerability on the survival of the fittest older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127519
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):161-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Melissa K Andrew
Arnold Mitnitski
Susan A Kirkland
Kenneth Rockwood
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. mandrew@dal.ca
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):161-5
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Physical Fitness
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
even older adults who are fit experience adverse health outcomes; understanding their risks for adverse outcomes may offer insight into ambient population health. Here, we evaluated mortality risk in relation to social vulnerability among the fittest older adults in a representative community-dwelling sample of older Canadians.
in this secondary analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, participants (n = 5,703) were aged 70+ years at baseline. A frailty index was used to grade relative levels of fitness/frailty, using 31 self-reported health deficits. The analysis was limited to the fittest people (those reporting 0-1 health deficit). Social vulnerability was trichotomised from a social vulnerability scale, which consisted of 40 self-reported social deficits.
five hundred and eighty-four individuals had 0-1 health deficit. Among them, absolute mortality risk rose with increasing social vulnerability. In those with the lowest level of social vulnerability, 5-year mortality was 10.8%, compared with 32.5% for those with the highest social vulnerability (adjusted hazard ratio 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5-4.3, P = 0.001).
a 22% absolute mortality difference in the fittest older adults is of considerable clinical and public health importance. Routine assessment of social vulnerability by clinicians could have value in predicting the risk of adverse health outcomes in older adults.
PubMed ID
22287038 View in PubMed
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Kynurenines as predictors of acute coronary events in the Hordaland Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272283
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015;189:18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Simone J P M Eussen
Per Magne Ueland
Stein E Vollset
Ottar Nygård
Øivind Midttun
Gerhard Sulo
Arve Ulvik
Klaus Meyer
Eva Ringdal Pedersen
Grethe S Tell
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015;189:18-24
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - blood - mortality - physiopathology
Age Factors
Aged
Angina Pectoris - blood - mortality - physiopathology
Biomarkers - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent living
Kynurenine - metabolism
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - mortality - physiopathology
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The kynurenine pathway, the main metabolic route of tryptophan degradation, has been related to inflammatory responses. Some of its metabolites, referred to as kynurenines, have been associated with prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in cross-sectional studies. This prospective study aims to investigate whether increased concentrations of kynurenines are associated with risk of acute coronary events, defined as unstable angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction, and/or sudden death in community-dwelling elderly.
The baseline examinations included 2819 individuals aged 71-74 years recruited into the Hordaland Health Study. Participants with known CHD at baseline were excluded from analyses. Baseline plasma concentrations of tryptophan, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, anthranilic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine, xanthurenic acid, and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid were measured by LC-MS/MS. During a median follow-up period of 10.8 years, with linkage to acute coronary event endpoints through the CVDNOR project, hazard ratios (HRs) for acute coronary events (n = 376) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard analyses.
After adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors, HRs (95% CI) comparing the 4th vs 1st quartile were 1.86 (1.19-2.92) for kynurenine and 1.72 (1.19-2.49) for 3-hydroxykynurenine. Tryptophan, kynurenic acid, anthranilic acid, xanthurenic acid and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid were not associated with acute coronary events.
Kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine were associated with increased risk of acute coronary events in community-dwelling elderly without a known history of CHD. These results suggest the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the early development of CHD, and their potential usefulness to estimate CHD risk.
PubMed ID
25885868 View in PubMed
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Long-term use of benzodiazepines and related drugs among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270647
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cognition - drug effects
Comorbidity
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Prevalence
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use, especially long-term use, and associated factors among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). We utilized data from the MEDALZ-2005 cohort, which includes all community-dwelling individuals diagnosed with AD in Finland at the end of 2005 and matched comparison individuals without AD. Register-based data included prescription drug purchases, comorbidities, and hospital discharge diagnoses. In this study, 24,966 individuals with AD and 24,985 individuals without AD were included. During the 4-year follow-up, we found that 45% (N = 11,312) of individuals with AD and 38% (N = 9534) of individuals without AD used BZDRs. The prevalence of long-term (= 180 days) BZDR use was more common among individuals with AD (30%) than individuals without AD (26%). The median durations of the first long-term use periods of BZDRs were 1.5 and 2 years for individuals with and without AD, respectively. Factors associated with long-term BZDR use included female sex, AD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, coronary artery disease, and asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The high prevalence of long-term BZDR use among individuals with AD is especially a cause for concern because long-term use may further impair cognition and may be associated with serious adverse events.
PubMed ID
26011780 View in PubMed
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Medication reviews in primary care in Sweden: importance of clinical pharmacists' recommendations on drug-related problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278473
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2016 Feb;38(1):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sara Modig
Lydia Holmdahl
Åsa Bondesson
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2016 Feb;38(1):41-5
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community Pharmacy Services - standards
Drug Compounding
Drug Dosage Calculations
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Substitution
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - prevention & control
Female
Frail Elderly
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - prevention & control
Independent living
Male
Medication Adherence
Medication Reconciliation
Medication Therapy Management - standards
Nursing Homes
Patient care team
Patient Safety
Pharmacists - standards
Primary Health Care - standards
Professional Role
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
One way of preventing and solving drug-related problems in frail elderly is to perform team-based medication reviews.
To evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service to primary care using structured medication reviews, focusing on the clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
A random sample of 150 patients (out of 1541) who received structured team based medication reviews. The patients lived at a geriatric nursing home or were =65 years and lived in ordinary housing with medication-related community help.
Based on information on symptoms, kidney function, blood pressure, diagnoses and the medication list, a pharmacist identified possible drug-related problems and supplied recommendations for the general practitioner to act on. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the clinical significance of the recommendations according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant). Main outcome measure The clinical significance of the recommendations. Results In total 349 drug-related problems were identified, leading to recommendations. The vast majority of the recommendations (96 %) were judged to have significance 3 or higher and more than the half were judged to have significance 4 or higher.
The high proportion of clinically significant recommendations provided by pharmacists when performing team-based medication reviews suggest that these clinical pharmacy services have potential to increase prescribing quality. As such, the medication reviews have the potential for contributing to a better and safer drug therapy for elderly patients.
PubMed ID
26582483 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.