Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

Combined resistance and balance-jumping exercise reduces older women's injurious falls and fractures: 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273603
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Saija Karinkanta
Pekka Kannus
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Muscle strength
Odds Ratio
Postural Balance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Resistance Training
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
previously, a randomised controlled exercise intervention study (RCT) showed that combined resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB) improved physical functioning and bone strength. The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess whether this exercise intervention had long-lasting effects in reducing injurious falls and fractures.
five-year health-care register-based follow-up study after a 1-year, four-arm RCT.
community-dwelling older women in Finland.
one hundred and forty-five of the original 149 RCT participants; women aged 70-78 years at the beginning.
participants' health-care visits were collected from computerised patient register. An injurious fall was defined as an event in which the subject contacted the health-care professionals or was taken to a hospital, due to a fall. The rate of injured fallers was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, HR), and the rate of injurious falls and fractures by Poisson regression (risk ratio, RR).
eighty-one injurious falls including 26 fractures occurred during the follow-up. The rate of injured fallers was 62% lower in COMB group compared with the controls (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85). In addition, COMB group had 51% less injurious falls (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.98) and 74% less fractures (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.97).
home-dwelling older women who participated in a 12-month intensive multi-component exercise training showed a reduced incidence for injurious falls during 5-year post-intervention period. Reduction in fractures was also evident. These long-term effects need to be confirmed in future studies.
PubMed ID
25990940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dementia and road traffic accidents among non-institutionalized older people in Denmark: A Danish register-based nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299164
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):221-228
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Jindong Ding Petersen
Volkert Dirk Siersma
René Depont Christensen
Maria Munch Storsveen
Connie Thurøe Nielsen
Mikkel Vass
Frans Boch Waldorff
Author Affiliation
1 Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):221-228
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Dementia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
We used register-based data to estimate the effect of all-type dementia on road traffic accidents (RTAs) risk, combined with comorbidities or sedative medicines, among non-institutionalized older people in Denmark.
The source population was all residents in Denmark aged 65 years and older, alive as of January 1, 2008 ( n = 853,228). Cases were those who had any type of RTA in 2009-2014. Each case was matched for age, sex and geographic location to 4-6 controls. All-type dementia was ascertained using the International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10) diagnosis supplemented with prescribed medicine records. Eight chronic diseases were selected to assess comorbidities. Four types of medicines were categorized as sedative medicines for analysis. Conditional logistic regression with adjustment for education and marital status as well as either the number of comorbidities or sedative medications use was performed using STATA software.
Older people with dementia had lower RTAs risk compared to their controls (odds ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (0.32-0.60), p
PubMed ID
29914317 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dependency and transfer incomes in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263808
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Charlotte Starhof
Niels Anker
Tove Henriksen
Christina Funch Lassen
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population above 65 years of age. The aim of this study was to define the estimated Danish IPD population and to elucidate source of income and labour market affiliation for working-age IPD patients.
IPD cases were included through the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The participants had to be alive by the end of 2010 and at least twice have cashed in prescriptions on IPD medication in the 2009-2010 period. Information on employment status and transfer income was retrieved through the DREAM database under the Danish Ministry of Employment.
A total of 7,033 estimated IPD patients were identified. The mean age at time of registration (2010, week 50) was 72 years. Overall, 7% of the IPD patients were employed and 5% were self-supportive. In the working age range (18-64 years), 25% were employed and 10% enrolled in supported employment. Compared with the age-adjusted general population, twice as many IPD patients were outside the ordinary labour market and, furthermore, the proportion receiving anticipatory pension was increased threefold. The majority (89%) of the patients were living at home with a spouse (59%). 11% were nursing home residents.
The working age IPD population was more prone to be outside employment and to receive public transfer income than an age-adjusted population sample.
The study was funded by the Danish Parkinson Association.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25283617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Different patterns in use of antibiotics for lower urinary tract infection in institutionalized and home-dwelling elderly: a register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121293
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;69(3):665-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Ylva Haasum
Johan Fastbom
Kristina Johnell
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Gävlegatan 16, 113 30 Stockholm, Sweden. Ylva.Haasum@ki.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;69(3):665-71
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization - trends
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Guideline Adherence
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Institutionalization
Logistic Models
Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Polypharmacy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Registries
Sex Factors
Sweden
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology
Abstract
We compared the quality and pattern of use of antibiotics to treat urinary tract infection (UTI) between institutionalized and home-dwelling elderly.
We analyzed the quality of use of UTI antibiotics in Swedish people aged = 65 years at 30 September 2008 (1,260,843 home-dwelling and 86,721 institutionalized elderly). Data regarding drug use, age and sex were retrieved from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and information about type of housing from the Social Services Register. In women, we assessed: (1) the proportion who use quinolones (should be as low as possible); (2) the proportion treated with the recommended drugs (pivmecillinam, nitrofurantoin, or trimethoprim) (proportions should be about 40 %, 40 % and 15-20 %, respectively); In men, we assessed: (1) the proportion who used quinolones or trimethoprim (should be as high as possible).
The 1-day point prevalence for antibiotic use for UTI was 1.6 % among institutionalized and 0.9 % among home-dwelling elderly. Of these, about 15 % of institutionalized and 19 % of home-dwelling women used quinolones. The proportion of women treated with the recommended drugs pivmecillinam, nitrofurantoin or trimethoprim was 29 %, 27 % and 45 % in institutions and 40 %, 28 % and 34 % for home-dwellers. In men treated with antibiotics for UTI, quinolones or trimethoprim were used by about 76 % in institutions and 85 % in home-dwellers.
Our results indicate that recommendations for UTI treatment with antibiotics are not adequately followed. The high use of trimethoprim amongst institutionalized women and the low use of quinolones or trimethoprim among institutionalized men need further investigation.
PubMed ID
22922683 View in PubMed
Less detail

Drug use in centenarians compared with nonagenarians and octogenarians in Sweden: a nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129199
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):218-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Jonas W Wastesson
Marti G Parker
Johan Fastbom
Mats Thorslund
Kristina Johnell
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Gävlegatan 16, SE-113 30 Stockholm, Sweden. jonas.wastesson@ki.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):218-24
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Independent living
Institutionalization
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Palliative Care
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
the number of centenarians increases rapidly. Yet, little is known about their health and use of medications.
to investigate pharmacological drug use in community-dwelling and institutionalised centenarians compared with nonagenarians and octogenarians.
we analysed data on dispensed drugs for centenarians (n = 1,672), nonagenarians (n = 76,584) and octogenarians (n = 383,878) from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, record-linked to the Swedish Social Services Register. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse whether age was associated with use of drugs, after adjustment for sex, living situation and co-morbidity.
in the adjusted analysis, centenarians were more likely to use analgesics, hypnotics/sedatives and anxiolytics, but less likely to use antidepressants than nonagenarians and octogenarians. Moreover, centenarians were more likely to use high-ceiling diuretics, but less likely to use beta-blockers and ACE-inhibitors.
centenarians high use of analgesics, hypnotics/sedatives and anxiolytics either reflects a palliative approach to drug treatment in centenarians or that pain and mental health problems increase into extreme old age. Also, centenarians do not seem to be prescribed cardiovascular drug therapy according to guidelines to the same extent as nonagenarians and octogenarians. Whether this reflects an age or cohort effect should be evaluated in longitudinal studies.
PubMed ID
22130561 View in PubMed
Less detail

Duration of new antidepressant use and factors associated with discontinuation among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300475
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Reetta Kettunen
Heidi Taipale
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Marjaana Koponen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To study how long antidepressants initiated after diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were used and factors associated with discontinuation of use among persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, differences in duration of use between the antidepressants groups were compared.
Register-based Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort included 70,718 community-dwelling people with AD who were diagnosed during the years 2005-2011. For this study, the new antidepressant users were included after 1-year washout period (N?=?16,501; 68.6% females, mean age 80.9). The duration of antidepressant use was modeled with the PRE2DUP method. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were assessed with Cox proportional hazard models and included age, gender, comorbid conditions and concomitant medications.
Median duration of the new antidepressant use period was 309 days (IQR 93-830). For selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use, the median duration was 331 days (IQR 101-829), for mirtazapine 202 days (IQR 52-635), and for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) 134 days (IQR 37-522). After 1-year follow-up, 40.8% had discontinued antidepressant use, 54.6% after 2 years and 64.1% after 3 years. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were age over 85, male gender, diabetes, and use of memantine, opioids, and antiepileptics whereas benzodiazepines and related drugs and antipsychotic use were inversely associated with discontinuation.
Antidepressants are used for long-term among people with AD. Need and indication for antidepressant use should be assessed regularly as evidence on their efficacy for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia is limited.
PubMed ID
30413841 View in PubMed
Less detail

Living Alone with Alzheimer's Disease: Data from SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292004
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 58(4):1265-1272
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Pavla Cermakova
Maja Nelson
Juraj Secnik
Sara Garcia-Ptacek
Kristina Johnell
Johan Fastbom
Lena Kilander
Bengt Winblad
Maria Eriksdotter
Dorota Religa
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences andSociety, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 58(4):1265-1272
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Antidepressive Agents
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent living
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Registries
Social Conditions
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Many people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) live alone in their own homes. There is a lack of knowledge about whether these individuals receive the same quality of diagnostics and treatment for AD as patients who are cohabiting.
To investigate the diagnostic work-up and treatment of community-dwelling AD patients who live alone.
We performed a cross-sectional cohort study based on data from the Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem). We studied patients diagnosed with AD between 2007 and 2015 (n?=?26,163). Information about drugs and comorbidities was acquired from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and the Swedish Patient Register.
11,878 (46%) patients lived alone, primarily older women. After adjusting for confounders, living alone was inversely associated with receiving computed tomography (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.82-0.99), magnetic resonance imaging (OR 0.91; 95% CI 0.83-0.99), and lumbar puncture (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.80-0.92). Living alone was also negatively associated with the use of cholinesterase inhibitors (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.76; 0.87), memantine (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.72; 0.83), and cardiovascular medication (OR 0.92; 0.86; 0.99). On the other hand, living alone was positively associated with the use of antidepressants (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.08; 1.22), antipsychotics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.25; 1.58), and hypnotics and sedatives (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.02; 1.17).
Solitary living AD patients do not receive the same extent of care as those who are cohabiting.
Notes
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2017 Oct;21(10 ):1065-1071 PMID 27267633
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2017 Jan;18(1):19-23 PMID 27639334
Cites: Popul Trends. 2004 Spring;(115):24-34 PMID 15192891
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Jun 09;11:450 PMID 21658213
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Feb 19;10(2):e0116538 PMID 25695768
Cites: Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2011 Nov;24(6):461-72 PMID 21926624
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Dec;28(4):842-51 PMID 25562100
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jun;17(6):612-9 PMID 25581033
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2005;9(2):117-20 PMID 15791356
Cites: BMJ. 2009 Jul 02;339:b2462 PMID 19574312
Cites: Nat Sci Sleep. 2016 Jan 14;8:21-33 PMID 26834500
Cites: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2011 Jul-Sep;25(3):269-75 PMID 21285857
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Aug 28;337:a1227 PMID 18755769
Cites: Clin Interv Aging. 2014 Nov 14;9:1951-62 PMID 25484578
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(5):373-83 PMID 3558716
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;52(2):619-29 PMID 27031480
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2013 Aug;41(6):637-43 PMID 23567645
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Apr;63(4):651-8 PMID 25900483
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):949-58 PMID 26402118
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-9 PMID 16224307
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Apr 15;355(9212):1315-9 PMID 10776744
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1991 Mar;91(3):300-4 PMID 1997551
Cites: Int J Psychiatry Med. 2012;43(1):19-34 PMID 22641928
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Jul;16(7):726-35 PMID 16897791
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 1998 Jul;13(7):484-92 PMID 9695039
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(1):229-39 PMID 26401943
Cites: Alzheimers Res Ther. 2014 Jun 16;6(3):34 PMID 25024749
Cites: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2013 Apr-Jun;27(2):123-32 PMID 22546783
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 1;154(9):854-64 PMID 11682368
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2014 Dec;59(12):624-31 PMID 25702361
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2012;33(2-3):104-10 PMID 22472600
Cites: Gerontologist. 1994 Feb;34(1):8-14 PMID 8150314
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2016 Feb;26(1):182-7 PMID 25817209
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2012;33(2-3):90-5 PMID 22433665
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2016 Apr;15(5):455-532 PMID 26987701
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2013 Feb;12(2):207-16 PMID 23332364
PubMed ID
28550260 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term use of benzodiazepines and related drugs among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270647
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cognition - drug effects
Comorbidity
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Prevalence
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use, especially long-term use, and associated factors among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). We utilized data from the MEDALZ-2005 cohort, which includes all community-dwelling individuals diagnosed with AD in Finland at the end of 2005 and matched comparison individuals without AD. Register-based data included prescription drug purchases, comorbidities, and hospital discharge diagnoses. In this study, 24,966 individuals with AD and 24,985 individuals without AD were included. During the 4-year follow-up, we found that 45% (N = 11,312) of individuals with AD and 38% (N = 9534) of individuals without AD used BZDRs. The prevalence of long-term (= 180 days) BZDR use was more common among individuals with AD (30%) than individuals without AD (26%). The median durations of the first long-term use periods of BZDRs were 1.5 and 2 years for individuals with and without AD, respectively. Factors associated with long-term BZDR use included female sex, AD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, coronary artery disease, and asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The high prevalence of long-term BZDR use among individuals with AD is especially a cause for concern because long-term use may further impair cognition and may be associated with serious adverse events.
PubMed ID
26011780 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term use of proton pump inhibitors among community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291615
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Sep; 73(9):1149-1158
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Heidi Juntunen
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.B 1627, -70211, Kuopio, FI, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Sep; 73(9):1149-1158
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy
Diphosphonates - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Models, Theoretical
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Registries
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Abstract
The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of use and long-term use (=180 days) of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and associated factors among community-dwellers with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD).
MEDALZ cohort encompassed all persons who received a verified diagnosis of AD in Finland during the years 2005-2011 and their age-, sex-, and region of residence-matched comparison persons, including 69,353 persons with and 69,353 persons without AD. Data was derived from several Finnish administrative registers. A mathematical modelling method, PRE2DUP, was used for converting dispensing data to drug use periods (when regular PPI use started and ended). Morbid conditions and concomitant drugs associated with use and long-term use of PPIs were assessed with logistic regression models.
Use of PPIs was more common among comparison persons than persons with AD (39.0 and 35.8%, respectively, p 
Notes
Cites: Am J Med. 2010 Jun;123(6):496-501 PMID 20569750
Cites: Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Jan;57(1):6-14 PMID 14678335
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2014 Apr;31(4):263-82 PMID 24634248
Cites: Int Psychogeriatr. 2016 Jul;28(7):1059-65 PMID 26744954
Cites: Eur J Intern Med. 2017 Jan;37:19-24 PMID 27784575
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2008 Oct;64(10):935-51 PMID 18679668
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2016 Jul;44(1):78-87 PMID 27137875
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Aug;57(8):1331-46 PMID 19573219
Cites: Arch Med Res. 2012 Nov;43(8):600-8 PMID 23159715
Cites: Clin Epidemiol. 2016 Oct 11;8:363-371 PMID 27785101
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2017 Jan;26(1):9-16 PMID 27859947
Cites: Res Social Adm Pharm. 2017 Mar - Apr;13(2):358-363 PMID 27033427
Cites: BMC Med. 2016 Nov 9;14 (1):179 PMID 27825371
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2017 Mar 15;49(3):null PMID 28298398
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Nov;63(11):1069-74 PMID 17712552
Cites: JAMA Neurol. 2016 Apr;73(4):410-6 PMID 26882076
Cites: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2015 Aug;265(5):419-28 PMID 25341874
Cites: BMJ Open. 2016 Jul 13;6(7):e012100 PMID 27412109
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Dec;64(12 ):e291-e296 PMID 27996115
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 May;58(5):880-8 PMID 20406320
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2016 Sep;25(9):1079-87 PMID 27255671
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2013 Jun;27(3):443-54 PMID 23998981
Cites: Ann Clin Biochem. 2013 Jul;50(Pt 4):315-29 PMID 23592803
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2015 Mar 25;15:21 PMID 25890003
Cites: Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42 Suppl 1:i1-57 PMID 23420266
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2017 Apr;21(4):658-667 PMID 27862681
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2016 Sep;25(9):1070-8 PMID 27184012
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Sep;28(3):154-9 PMID 20586539
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2012 Aug 1;29(8):681-90 PMID 22775478
Cites: Therap Adv Gastroenterol. 2016 Sep;9(5):671-8 PMID 27582879
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2010 Apr 1;27(4):337-49 PMID 20359263
Cites: Neurology. 1984 Jul;34(7):939-44 PMID 6610841
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2010 Jul 1;27(7):545-58 PMID 20583849
PubMed ID
28577224 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Medication use among community-dwelling older Icelanders. Population-based study in urban and rural areas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129175
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Dec;97(12):675-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Solveig Asa Arnadottir
Elín Díanna Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
arun@unak.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Dec;97(12):675-80
Date
Dec-2011
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Polypharmacy
Prescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Registries
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To describe medication use among older community-dwelling Icelanders by collecting information on number of medicine, polypharmacy (>5 medications), and medications by ATC categories. Moreover, to explore the relationship between medication use and various influential factors emphasizing residency in urban and rural areas.
Population-based, cross-sectional study. Participants were randomly selected from the National registry in one urban (n=118) and two rural (n=68) areas.
1) = 65 years old, 2) community-dwelling, 3) able to communicate verbally. Information on medication use was obtained from each person's medication list and interviews. A questionnaire and five standardized instruments were used to assess the potential influencing factors.
On average, participants used 3.9 medications and prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. Men used 3.5 medications on average and women 4.4 (p=0.018). Compared to rural residents, urban residents had fewer medical diagnoses, better mobility, less pain, and fewer depressive symptoms. By controlling for the effects of these variables, more medications were associated with urban living (p
PubMed ID
22133526 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.