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Concern about falling in older women with a history of falls: associations with health, functional ability, physical activity and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106791
Source
Gerontology. 2014;60(1):22-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Radhika Patil
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Pekka Kannus
Saija Karinkanta
Harri Sievänen
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Gerontology. 2014;60(1):22-30
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Fear - psychology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Logistic Models
Motor Activity
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Fear of falling has been linked to activity restriction, functional decline, decreased quality of life and increased risk of falling. Factors that distinguish persons with a high concern about falling from those with low concern have not been systematically studied.
This study aimed to expose potential health-related, functional and psychosocial factors that correlate with fear of falling among independently living older women who had fallen in the past year.
Baseline data of 409 women aged 70-80 years recruited to a randomised falls prevention trial (DEX) (NCT00986466) were used. Participants were classified according to their level of concern about falling using the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I). Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to explore associations between health-related variables, functional performance tests, amount of physical activity, quality of life and FES-I scores.
68% of the participants reported a moderate to high concern (FES-I = 20) about falls. Multinomial logistic regression showed that highly concerned women were significantly more likely to have poorer health and quality of life and lower functional ability. Reported difficulties in instrumental activities of daily living, balance, outdoor mobility and poorer quality of life contributed independently to a greater concern about falling.
Concern about falling was highly prevalent in our sample of community-living older women. In particular, poor perceived general health and mobility constraints contributed independently to the difference between high and low concern of falling. Knowledge of these associations may help in developing interventions to reduce fear of falling and activity avoidance in old age.
PubMed ID
24107382 View in PubMed
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Formal home help services and institutionalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132916
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Mar-Apr;54(2):e52-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yukari Yamada
Volkert Siersma
Kirsten Avlund
Mikkel Vass
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Oester Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014, Copenhagen, Denmark. yuya@sund.ku.dk
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Mar-Apr;54(2):e52-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Housekeeping - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Institutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
The effect of home help services has been inconsistent. Raising the hypothesis that receiving small amounts of home help may postpone or prevent institutionalization, the aim of the present study is to analyze how light and heavy use of home help services was related to the risk for institutionalization. The study was a secondary analysis of a Danish intervention study on preventive home visits in 34 municipalities from 1999 to 2003, including 2642 home-dwelling older people who were nondisabled and did not receive public home help services at baseline in 1999 and who lived at home 18 months after baseline. Cox regression analysis showed that those who received home help services during the first 18 months after baseline were at higher risk of being institutionalized during the subsequent three years than those who did not receive such services. However, receiving home help for less than 1h per week during the first 18 months after baseline was not associated with an increased risk of institutionalization during the study period among those with physical or mental decline. Receiving public home help services was a strong indicator for institutionalization in Denmark. Receiving small amounts of home help and experiencing physical or mental decline was not associated with higher hazard for institutionalization compared with those who received no help.
PubMed ID
21764144 View in PubMed
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Life habits performance of individuals with brain injury in different living environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116565
Source
Brain Inj. 2013;27(2):135-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Marie-Eve Lamontagne
Frederique Poncet
Emmanuelle Careau
Marie-Josée Sirois
Normand Boucher
Author Affiliation
Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration (CIRRIS), Québec, Canada. lamontagne_marie@hotmail.com
Source
Brain Inj. 2013;27(2):135-44
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Adjustment
Social Participation
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Little is known about variations in social participation among individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) living in different environments.
To examine the social participation of individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI across various living arrangements.
One hundred and thirty-six individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI, living either in natural settings (e.g. home), intermediate settings (e.g. group homes or foster families) or structured settings (e.g. nursing home or long-term care facilities) and requiring daily assistance, were interviewed using the LIFE-H tool, which measures the level of difficulty and the assistance required to carry out life habits and resulting social participation. Participation in six categories of life habits pertaining to Activities of Daily Living and five categories pertaining to Social Roles were examined.
The level of difficulty and the assistance required to carry out the life habits and the overall level of social participation were associated with living arrangements. Participation scores in Activities of Daily Living varied across living arrangements while Social Roles scores did not.
Living arrangements (such as intermediate settings) may better support social participation in individuals with TBI. There is a need to further study the issue of living arrangements as they seem to facilitate the performance of life habits, which impacts the social participation of individuals with TBI.
PubMed ID
23384212 View in PubMed
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[Medication use among community-dwelling older Icelanders. Population-based study in urban and rural areas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129175
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Dec;97(12):675-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Solveig Asa Arnadottir
Elín Díanna Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
arun@unak.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Dec;97(12):675-80
Date
Dec-2011
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Polypharmacy
Prescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Registries
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To describe medication use among older community-dwelling Icelanders by collecting information on number of medicine, polypharmacy (>5 medications), and medications by ATC categories. Moreover, to explore the relationship between medication use and various influential factors emphasizing residency in urban and rural areas.
Population-based, cross-sectional study. Participants were randomly selected from the National registry in one urban (n=118) and two rural (n=68) areas.
1) = 65 years old, 2) community-dwelling, 3) able to communicate verbally. Information on medication use was obtained from each person's medication list and interviews. A questionnaire and five standardized instruments were used to assess the potential influencing factors.
On average, participants used 3.9 medications and prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. Men used 3.5 medications on average and women 4.4 (p=0.018). Compared to rural residents, urban residents had fewer medical diagnoses, better mobility, less pain, and fewer depressive symptoms. By controlling for the effects of these variables, more medications were associated with urban living (p
PubMed ID
22133526 View in PubMed
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Nutritional self-care in two older Norwegian males: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112681
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:609-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Solveig T Tomstad
Ulrika Söderhamn
Geir Arild Espnes
Olle Söderhamn
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. solveig.t.tomstad@uia.no
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:609-20
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Nutritional Support
Questionnaires
Self Care
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Knowledge about how to support nutritional self-care in the vulnerable elderly living in their own homes is an important area for health care professionals. The aim of this case study was to evaluate the effects of nutritional intervention by comparing perceived health, sense of coherence, self-care ability, and nutritional risk in two older home-dwelling individuals before, during, and after intervention and to describe their experiences of nutritional self-care before and after intervention.
A study circle was established to support nutritional self-care in two older home-dwelling individuals (=65 years of age), who participated in three meetings arranged by health professionals over a period of six months. The effects of this study circle were evaluated using the Nutritional Form For the Elderly, the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly (SASE), the Appraisal of Self-care Agency scale, the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, and responses to a number of health-related questions. Qualitative interviews were performed before and after intervention to interpret the changes that occurred during intervention.
A reduced risk of undernutrition was found for both participants. A higher total score on the SASE was obtained for one participant, along with a slightly stronger preference for self-care to maintain sufficient food intake, was evident. For the other participant, total score on the SASE decreased, but the SOC score improved after intervention. Decreased mobility was reported, but this did not influence his food intake. The study circle was an opportunity to express personal views and opinions about food intake and meals.
An organized meeting place for dialogue between older home-dwelling individuals and health care professionals can stimulate the older person's engagement, consciousness, and learning about nutritional self-care, and thereby be of importance in reducing the risk of undernutrition.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23807843 View in PubMed
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Older men's lay definitions of successful aging over time: the Manitoba follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108708
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2013;76(4):297-322
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Robert B Tate
Audrey U Swift
Dennis J Bayomi
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Robert.Tate@med.umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2013;76(4):297-322
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Gender Identity
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Population Dynamics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Retirement
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
The concept of "successful aging" has become widely accepted in gerontology, yet continues to have no common underlying definition. Researchers have increasingly looked to older individuals for their lay definitions of successful aging. The present analysis is based on responses to five questionnaires administered to surviving participants of the male Manitoba Follow-up Study cohort (www.mfus.ca) in 1996, 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006 (n = 2,043 men were alive at a mean age of 78 years in 1996). One question on each survey asked: "What is YOUR definition of successful aging?" Applying content analysis to the 5,898 narratives received over the 11 years, we developed a coding system encompassing 21 main themes and 86 sub-themes defining successful aging. We quantitatively analyzed trends in prevalence of themes of successful aging prospectively over time. Our findings empirically support colleagues' past suggestions to shift from defining successful aging in primarily biomedical terms, by taking lay views into account.
PubMed ID
23855184 View in PubMed
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Porvoo sarcopenia and nutrition trial: effects of protein supplementation on functional performance in home-dwelling sarcopenic older people - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106182
Source
Trials. 2013;14:387
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mikko P Bjorkman
Merja H Suominen
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Harriet U Finne-Soveri
Reijo S Tilvis
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Helsinki, PO Box 340, 00029 HUS Helsinki, Finland. mikko.bjorkman@helsinki.fi.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:387
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Exercise Test
Exercise Therapy
Finland
Frail Elderly
Gait
Geriatric Assessment
Hand Strength
Humans
Independent living
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Sarcopenia - diagnosis - diet therapy - mortality - physiopathology - psychology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Age-related muscle loss (that is, sarcopenia) is a common health problem among older people. Physical exercise and dietary protein have been emphasized in prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Rigorous trials investigating the effects of protein supplementation on physical performance in sarcopenic populations are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of protein supplementation along with simple home-based exercises on physical performance among home-dwelling sarcopenic older people.
During 2012 the entire 75 and older population (N = 3,275) living in Porvoo, Finland was contacted via a postal questionnaire. Persons at risk of sarcopenia are screened with hand grip strength and gait speed. Poorly performing persons are further examined by segmental bioimpendance spectroscopy to determine their skeletal muscle index. Sarcopenic patients (target N = 250) will be enrolled in a 12-month randomized controlled trial with three arms: 1) no supplementation, 2) protein supplementation (20 grams twice a day), and 3) isocaloric placebo. All the participants will receive instructions on simple home-based exercises, dietary protein, and vitamin D supplementation (20 µg/d). The recruitment of patients will be completed during 2013. The primary endpoint of the trial is the change in short physical performance battery score and percentage of patients maintaining or improving their physical performance. Secondary endpoints will be, among other things, changes in muscle functions, nutritional status, body composition, cognition, quality of life, use of health care services, falls, and mortality. The assessment times will be 0, 6, 12 and 24 months.
To our knowledge, this is the first large scale randomized controlled trial among community dwelling older people with sarcopenia that focuses on the effects of protein supplementation on physical performance.
ACTRN12612001253897, date of registration 28 October 2012, first patient was randomized 11 April 2012.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24225081 View in PubMed
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Progressive strength training in older patients after hip fracture: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137788
Source
Age Ageing. 2011 Mar;40(2):221-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Hilde Sylliaas
Therese Brovold
Torgeir Bruun Wyller
Astrid Bergland
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway. hilde.sylliaas@medisin.uio.no
Source
Age Ageing. 2011 Mar;40(2):221-7
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Chi-Square Distribution
Exercise Test
Female
Fracture Fixation
Hip Fractures - physiopathology - rehabilitation - surgery
Humans
Independent living
Male
Muscle strength
Norway
Postural Balance
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Resistance Training
Single-Blind Method
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Walking
Abstract
the aim of this study was to assess the effect of a 3-month strength-training programme on functional performance and self-rated health in a group of home-dwelling older hip fracture patients.
randomised, controlled; single-blind parallel-group trial.
intervention at outpatient's clinic.
one hundred and fifty patients with surgical fixation for a hip fracture.
strength training was integrated into all stages of the programme. The programme comprised four exercises, half of them in a standing position, performed at 80% of maximum. Measurements were taken after the 3-month intervention. The primary outcome measurement was the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Secondary outcomes were results of the sit-to-stand test, Timed Up-and-Go test, maximal gait speed, 6-min walk test, Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living scale and the SF-12 health status questionnaire.
at baseline, there were no significant between-group differences. At follow-up, the intervention group showed highly significant improvements both in the primary endpoint (BBS, mean difference 4.7 points) and in secondary endpoints of tapping strength, mobility and instrumental activities of daily living.
home-dwelling hip fracture patients can benefit from an extended supervised strength-training programme in a rehabilitation setting. These patients are capable of high-intensity strength training, which should optimise gains in physical function, strength and balance. Resistance exercise training seems to influence functional performance adaptation.
PubMed ID
21247887 View in PubMed
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Reliability and validity of the French-Canadian Late Life Function and Disability Instrument in community-living wheelchair-users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112880
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 Sep;20(5):365-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Brodie M Sakakibara
François Routhier
Marie-Pier Lavoie
William C Miller
Author Affiliation
Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 Sep;20(5):365-73
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Independent living
Language
Lower Extremity - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Participation
Upper Extremity - physiology
Wheelchairs
Abstract
To examine the test-retest reliability, standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, construct validity, and ceiling and floor effects in the French-Canadian Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI-F).
The LLFDI-F is a measure of activity (i.e. physical functioning of upper and lower extremities), and participation (i.e. frequency of and limitations with). The measure was administered over the telephone to a sample of community-living wheelchair-users, who were 50 years of age and older, in this 10-day retest methodological study. The sample (n = 40) was mostly male (70%), had a mean age of 62.2 years, and mean experience with using a wheelchair of 20.2 years. Sixty-five percent used a manual wheelchair.
The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) for the participation component ranged from 0.68 to 0.90 and from 0.74 to 0.97 for the activity component. Minimal detectable changes ranged from 7.18 to 22.56 in the participation component and from 4.71 to 16.19 in the activity component. Mann-Whitney U-tests revealed significant differences between manual and power wheelchair-users in the personal and instrumental role domains, and all areas in the activity component.
There is support for the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the LLFDI-F in community-living wheelchair-users, 50 years of age and older. However, because the majority of items in the lower-extremity domains of the activity component do not account for assistive device use, they are not recommended for use with individuals who have little or no use of their lower-extremities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23786550 View in PubMed
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Self-respect through ability to keep fear of frailty at a distance: successful ageing from the perspective of community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115404
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2013;8:20194
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Helena M Hörder
Kerstin Frändin
Maria E H Larsson
Author Affiliation
Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. Helena.Horder@vgregion.se
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2013;8:20194
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health
Fear
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
With population ageing, there is an increased interest in how to promote a good old age. A predominant concept in these discussions is successful ageing, which is mainly based on researchers' definitions. This article aims to explore successful ageing from the perspective of community-dwelling older people (24 persons aged 77-90 years). Individual open interviews were conducted and analysed according to qualitative content analysis. An overarching theme was formulated as "self-respect through ability to keep fear of frailty at a distance". This embraced the content of four categories: "having sufficient bodily resources for security and opportunities", "structures that promote security and opportunities", "feeling valuable in relation to the outside world", and "choosing gratitude instead of worries". Ageing seems to be a dynamic process rather than a static structure and might therefore be susceptible to actions. Paying attention to attitudes and treating the older person with respect, particularly with regard to worries about increasing vulnerability, can lead to better ways of promoting successful ageing.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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