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An evaluation by elderly people living at home of the prepared meals distributed by their municipality - a study with focus on the Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264566
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2015 May;7(3):59-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Oleg Pajalic
Zada Pajalic
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2015 May;7(3):59-68
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Consumer Behavior
Female
Food Services
Home Care Services
Homebound Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent living
Male
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Prepared meals distributed by municipalities is a service to elderly people, or persons with health related impairments, who live in their own home, have difficulties preparing their own food and cannot meet their food requirements in any other way. This study aimed to provide a brief picture of how elderly people living at home perceive the food they receive through their municipal food service and what is important to them. The data was collected using questionnaires. 274 out of 276 participants answered the questionnaire (n=173 women 62% and n=101 man 37%). The data was analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The results showed that the elderly persons receiving meals through the service were often satisfied, especially with the size of the portions and the delivery time. Those who had been using the food delivery service for a longer time were not satisfied with the alternative dishes they were been offered. There was no significant difference between the views of either gender. Further, those who were receiving special food were, in general, unsatisfied with the meals delivered. Development of the food distribution service by systematic quality insurance and interactive knowledge exchange between the producers and consumers seems to be a way to promote a more holistic and individual adjusted service. Evaluation of the municipal FD service is a powerful tool that can contribute to the development of this service. The food service can be improved and consequently even the quality of life and health of its receivers. The present survey should be revisited and developed in order to detect differences between genders.
PubMed ID
25948451 View in PubMed
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Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
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Chronic pain among community-dwelling elderly: a population-based clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282167
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Jun;34(2):159-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Susanna Rapo-Pylkkö
Maija Haanpää
Helena Liira
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Jun;34(2):159-64
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Chronic Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
House Calls
Humans
Independent living
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Neuralgia - complications
Quality of Life
Sex Distribution
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To present the occurrence, characteristics, etiology, interference, and medication of chronic pain among the elderly living independently at home.
A total of 460 subjects in three cohorts aged 75, 80 and 85 years respectively received visits by communal home-care department nurses for a cross-sectional survey. Of them, 175 had chronic (duration = 3 months) pain with an average intensity of = 4/10 and/or = moderate interference in daily life.
Clinical assessment was performed for consenting subjects to define the location, intensity, etiology, type, interference and medications of chronic pain.
According to home visits, elderly people with chronic pain rated their health and mobility worse and felt sadder, lonelier and more tired than those without chronic pain. A geriatrician made clinical assessments for 106 patients with chronic pain in 2009-2013. Of them, 66 had three, 35 had two and 5 had one pain condition. The worst pain was musculoskeletal in 88 (83%) of patients. Pain was pure nociceptive in 61 (58%), pure neuropathic in 9 (8%), combined nociceptive and neuropathic pain in 34 (32%), and idiopathic in 2 (2%) patients. On a numerical rating scale from 0 to 10, the mean and maximal intensity of the worst pain was 5.7 and 7.7, respectively, while the mean pain interference was 5.9. Mean pain intensity and maximal pain intensity decreased by age. Duration of pain was longer than 5 years in 51 (48%) patients. Regular pain medication was used by 82 (77%) patients, most commonly paracetamol or NSAIDs. Although pain limited the lives of the elderly with chronic pain, they were as satisfied with their lives as those without chronic pain.
Elderly people in our study often suffered from chronic pain, mostly musculoskeletal pain, and the origin of pain was neuropathic in up to 40% of these cases. However, elderly people with chronic pain rarely used the medications specifically for neuropathic pain. Based on increased loneliness, sadness and tiredness, as well as decreased subjective health and mobility, the quality of life was decreased among those with chronic pain compared with those without pain. KEY POINTS It is known that chronic pain is one of the most common reasons for general practice consultations and is more common in women than men. In our study using detailed clinical examinations, up to 40% of patients with chronic pain in cohorts aged 75, 80 and 85 years suffered from neuropathic pain. However, only a few elderly people with chronic pain used medications specifically for chronic pain, which may be due to side effects or non-willingness to experiment with these drugs. Elderly people with chronic pain rated their health and mobility to be worse and felt sadder, lonelier and more tired but were not less satisfied with their lives than those without chronic pain.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Nov 12;290(18):2435-4214612480
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PubMed ID
27065337 View in PubMed
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Concern about falling in older women with a history of falls: associations with health, functional ability, physical activity and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106791
Source
Gerontology. 2014;60(1):22-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Radhika Patil
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Pekka Kannus
Saija Karinkanta
Harri Sievänen
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Gerontology. 2014;60(1):22-30
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Fear - psychology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Logistic Models
Motor Activity
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Fear of falling has been linked to activity restriction, functional decline, decreased quality of life and increased risk of falling. Factors that distinguish persons with a high concern about falling from those with low concern have not been systematically studied.
This study aimed to expose potential health-related, functional and psychosocial factors that correlate with fear of falling among independently living older women who had fallen in the past year.
Baseline data of 409 women aged 70-80 years recruited to a randomised falls prevention trial (DEX) (NCT00986466) were used. Participants were classified according to their level of concern about falling using the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I). Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to explore associations between health-related variables, functional performance tests, amount of physical activity, quality of life and FES-I scores.
68% of the participants reported a moderate to high concern (FES-I = 20) about falls. Multinomial logistic regression showed that highly concerned women were significantly more likely to have poorer health and quality of life and lower functional ability. Reported difficulties in instrumental activities of daily living, balance, outdoor mobility and poorer quality of life contributed independently to a greater concern about falling.
Concern about falling was highly prevalent in our sample of community-living older women. In particular, poor perceived general health and mobility constraints contributed independently to the difference between high and low concern of falling. Knowledge of these associations may help in developing interventions to reduce fear of falling and activity avoidance in old age.
PubMed ID
24107382 View in PubMed
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Effects of preventive home visits on health-related quality-of-life and mortality in home-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300278
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2019 Mar; 37(1):90-97
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Heini Liimatta
Pekka Lampela
Pirjo Laitinen-Parkkonen
Kaisu H Pitkala
Author Affiliation
a Hyvinkää City Health Centre , Hyvinkää , Finland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2019 Mar; 37(1):90-97
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geriatric Assessment
Home Care Services
House Calls
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mortality
Preventive Health Services
Quality of Life
Abstract
We explored the effectiveness of preventive home visits on the health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and mortality among independently community-dwelling older adults.
A randomised controlled trial.
Independently home-dwelling older adults 75 years and older, consisting of 211 in the intervention and 211 in the control group.
Hyvinkää town municipality, Finland.
We used the change in HRQoL measured by the 15D scale as our primary outcome. Mortality at two years was retrieved from central registers.
At the one-year time point, the HRQoL according to the 15D scores deteriorated in the control group, whereas we found no change in the intervention group. The difference between the 15D score changes between the groups was -0.015 (95% CI -0.029 to -0.0016; p?=?0.028, adjusted for age, sex, and baseline value). At the two-year time point as the visits ended, that difference diminished. There was no difference in mortality between the groups during the 24-month follow-up.
Preventive home visits implemented by a multidisciplinary team with CGA appear to help slow down the decline in HRQoL among older adults, although the effect diminishes when the visits end. Key points We are exploring preventive home visits as means to support the health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) of home-dwelling older adults Multiprofessional preventive home visits in this intervention study helped to maintain the HRQoL when measured using 15D The effects on HRQoL diminished when the intervention ended, so could further benefits be attained with a longer intervention?The clinical trial registration number: ACTRN12616001411437.
PubMed ID
30810457 View in PubMed
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Effects of the Finnish Alzheimer disease exercise trial (FINALEX): a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114708
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2013
Author
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Minna M Pöysti
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Niina Savikko
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of Primary Health Care, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@helsinki.fi
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Date
May-27-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - economics - therapy
Caregivers
Day Care - economics - organization & administration
Exercise Therapy - economics - methods - organization & administration
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
House Calls - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapists
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Few rigorous clinical trials have investigated the effectiveness of exercise on the physical functioning of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD).
To investigate the effects of intense and long-term exercise on the physical functioning and mobility of home-dwelling patients with AD and to explore its effects on the use and costs of health and social services.
A randomized controlled trial.
A total of 210 home-dwelling patients with AD living with their spousal caregiver.
The 3 trial arms included (1) group-based exercise (GE; 4-hour sessions with approximately 1-hour training) and (2) tailored home-based exercise (HE; 1-hour training), both twice a week for 1 year, and (3) a control group (CG) receiving the usual community care.
The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Short Physical Performance Battery, and information on the use and costs of social and health care services.
All groups deteriorated in functioning during the year after randomization, but deterioration was significantly faster in the CG than in the HE or GE group at 6 (P = .003) and 12 (P = .015) months. The FIM changes at 12 months were -7.1 (95% CI, -3.7 to -10.5), -10.3 (95% CI, -6.7 to -13.9), and -14.4 (95% CI, -10.9 to -18.0) in the HE group, GE group, and CG, respectively. The HE and GE groups had significantly fewer falls than the CG during the follow-up year. The total costs of health and social services for the HE patient-caregiver dyads (in US dollars per dyad per year) were $25,112 (95% CI, $17,642 to $32,581) (P = .13 for comparison with the CG), $22,066 in the GE group ($15,931 to $28,199; P = .03 vs CG), and $34,121 ($24,559 to $43,681) in the CG.
An intensive and long-term exercise program had beneficial effects on the physical functioning of patients with AD without increasing the total costs of health and social services or causing any significant adverse effects.
anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2013 Aug 20;159(4):JC1024026274
Comment In: MMW Fortschr Med. 2013 Nov 7;155(19):3224475662
Comment In: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):901-223588877
PubMed ID
23589097 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of housing adaptation interventions: integrating the economic perspective into occupational therapy practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262808
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2014 Sep;21(5):323-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Carlos Chiatti
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2014 Sep;21(5):323-33
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architectural Accessibility - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Disability Evaluation
Housing - economics
Humans
Independent living
Occupational Therapy - methods
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Abstract
The home environment is a key determinant of health, quality of life, and well-being. Given its relevance for such aspects, the scarcity of evaluations of housing adaptation (HA) interventions aimed at removing environmental barriers and accessibility problems in the homes of people with disabilities is surprising. This article aims to contribute to the development of strategies for economic evaluations of HA interventions, by stimulating the dissemination and application of the concepts of effectiveness, cost, and cost-effectiveness as used within health economics.
The focus is limited to three overarching questions for the evaluation of HA interventions. Considering X and Y as two hypothetical interventions for the same individual case, the article asks: (i) Will X be more effective than Y?; (ii) Will X cost more than Y?, and (iii) Will X be more cost-effective than Y? Vignette-like descriptions of fictional cases are used to exemplify the economic concepts explained in the article.
In the conclusion, the need is stressed for new experimental data regarding both costs and outcomes of HA interventions, in order to realize sound evaluations with the potential to inform policy and professionals in this field. Given the heterogeneity among national contexts, systematic approaches applied in a coherent manner could strengthen cross-national research and collaborations.
PubMed ID
24784725 View in PubMed
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Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease--a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140239
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kaisu H Pitkala
Minna M Raivio
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of General Practice, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, PO Box 20, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@kolumbus.fi
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - economics - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Caregivers
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Day Care - economics
Depression - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy - economics
Finland
Frail Elderly
Health Care Costs
Humans
Independent living
Mobility Limitation
Neuropsychological Tests
Postural Balance
Quality of Life
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Walking
Abstract
Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD) leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD.
During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210) living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1) tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2) group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3) control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36). Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up.
To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention.
ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20925948 View in PubMed
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Forgotten resources of older home care clients: focus group study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115670
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2013 Sep;15(3):333-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Riitta Turjamaa
Sirpa Hartikainen
Anna-Maija Pietilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2013 Sep;15(3):333-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Frail Elderly - psychology
Geriatric Assessment
Health Resources - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Nurses, Community Health - organization & administration
Quality of Life
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
In this qualitative focus group study, the resources available to older home-dwelling people, particularly incoming and existing home care clients, are described from the viewpoint of home care professionals (n?=?32). The data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. There were three categories of older people requiring resources from the viewpoint of interviewers: home-dwelling people, incoming home care clients, and existing home care clients. Based on the analysis, the resources of older home-dwelling people were categorized in terms of support, meaningful life, everyday activities, and environment. Incoming home care client resources were support, out-of-home activities, in-home activities, and environment. Existing client resources were described in terms of support, everyday activities, and environment. Home care professionals described the resources of the older home-dwelling people in diverse ways, but those of the perspective of existing clients were reduced. The biggest difference was in everyday activities. Psychological and social resources, including meaningful life and social relationships, seemed to be forgotten. All available resources must be taken into account, especially in the everyday home care services for existing home care clients.
PubMed ID
23480058 View in PubMed
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Glycemic control and health-related quality of life among older home-dwelling primary care patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293508
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anna-Kaisa Aro
Merja Karjalainen
Miia Tiihonen
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Maija Haanpää
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Rantakylä Health Center, Siunsote, Finland. Electronic address: koistine@student.uef.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mental health
Mental Status and Dementia Tests
Mobility Limitation
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional capacity in relation to glycemic control among older home-dwelling primary care patients.
Electronic patient records were used to identify 527 people over 65 years with diabetes. Of these, 259 randomly selected subjects were invited to a health examination and 172 of them attended and provided complete data. The participants were divided into three groups based on the HbA1c: good (HbA1c57mmol/mol (N=29)) glycemic control. HRQoL was measured with the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire. Functional and cognitive capacity and mental well-being were assessed with the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15).
EQ-5D scores for good, intermediate and poor glycemic control were 0.78; 0.74 and 0.70, p=0.037. Sub-items of mobility (p=0.002) and self-care were the most affected (p=0.031). Corresponding trend was found for IADL, p=0.008. A significant correlation was found between MMSE scores and HbA1c.
Older primary care home-dwelling patients with diabetes and poorer glycemic control have lower functional capacity and HRQoL, especially in regard to mobility and self-care.
PubMed ID
28754430 View in PubMed
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