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Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
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Can we move beyond burden and burnout to support the health and wellness of family caregivers to persons with dementia? Evidence from British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132042
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Carole A Robinson
Susan Holtzman
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meredith.lilly@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - therapy
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After more than a decade of concerted effort by policy-makers in Canada and elsewhere to encourage older adults to age at home, there is recognition that the ageing-in-place movement has had unintended negative consequences for family members who care for seniors. This paper outlines findings of a qualitative descriptive study to investigate the health and wellness and support needs of family caregivers to persons with dementia in the Canadian policy environment. Focus groups were conducted in 2010 with 23 caregivers and the health professionals who support them in three communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Thematic analysis guided by the constant comparison technique revealed two overarching themes: (1) forgotten: abandoned to care alone and indefinitely captures the perceived consequences of caregivers' failed efforts to receive recognition and adequate services to support their care-giving and (2) unrealistic expectations for caregiver self-care relates to the burden of expectations for caregivers to look after themselves. Although understanding about the concepts of caregiver burden and burnout is now quite developed, the broader sociopolitical context giving rise to these negative consequences for caregivers to individuals with dementia has not improved. If anything, the Canadian homecare policy environment has placed caregivers in more desperate circumstances. A fundamental re-orientation towards caregivers and caregiver supports is necessary, beginning with viewing caregivers as a critical health human resource in a system that depends on their contributions in order to function. This re-orientation can create a space for providing caregivers with preventive supports, rather than resorting to costly patient care for caregivers who have reached the point of burnout and care recipients who have been institutionalised.
PubMed ID
21851447 View in PubMed
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Community-dwelling older adults with memory loss: needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115614
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Mar;59(3):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Karen Parsons
Aimee Surprenant
Anne-Marie Tracey
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL A1B 3V6. karenp@mun.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Mar;59(3):278-85
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Family Practice
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Memory Disorders - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
To identify the health-related needs of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss.
Qualitative study using semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups.
A large community in Newfoundland.
Twenty-two adults between the ages of 58 and 80 years.
This needs assessment used a qualitative methodology of collecting and analyzing narrative data to develop an understanding of the issues, resources, and constraints of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss. Data were collected through semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using interpretive phenomenologic analysis.
Three constitutive patterns with relational themes and subthemes were identified: forgetting and remembering, normalizing yet questioning, and having limited knowledge of resources. Participants described many examples of how their daily lives were affected by forgetfulness. They had very little knowledge of resources that provided information or support. Most of the participants believed they could not discuss their memory problems with their family doctors.
It is important for older adults with mild memory loss to have access to resources that will assist them in understanding their condition and make them feel supported.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23486801 View in PubMed
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Home Help Service Staffs' Descriptions of Their Role in Promoting Everyday Activities Among Older People in Sweden Who Are Dependent on Formal Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299773
Source
J Appl Gerontol. 2017 08; 36(8):971-992
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Sara Cederbom
Charlotta Thunborg
Eva Denison
Anne Söderlund
Petra von Heideken Wågert
Author Affiliation
1 School of Healt, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
J Appl Gerontol. 2017 08; 36(8):971-992
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The study aimed to explore how home help service staff described their role in improving the abilities of older people, in particular, older women with chronic pain who are dependent on formal care, to perform everyday activities. Three focus group interviews were conducted, and a qualitative inductive thematic content analysis was used. The analysis resulted in one theme: struggling to improve the care recipients' opportunities for independence but being inhibited by complex environmental factors. By encouraging the care recipients to perform everyday activities, the staff perceived themselves to both maintain and improve their care recipients' independence and quality of life. An important goal for society and health care professionals is to improve older people's abilities to "age in place" and to enable them to age independently while maintaining their quality of life. A key resource is home help service staff, and this resource should be utilized in the best possible way.
PubMed ID
26209706 View in PubMed
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Landlords' experiences of housing tenants suffering from severe mental illness: a Swedish empirical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256602
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2014 Jan;50(1):111-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
A. Bengtsson-Tops
L. Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Kristianstad University, 291 88, Kristianstad, Sweden, anita.bengtsson_tops@hkr.se.
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2014 Jan;50(1):111-9
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Community Mental Health Services
Cooperative Behavior
Crisis Intervention
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Housing
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Ownership
Private Sector
Psychotic Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Public Housing
Qualitative Research
Social Desirability
Social Responsibility
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this Swedish study was to describe landlords' experiences of having tenants suffering from severe mental illness. Sixteen landlords working in private and public housing agencies participated in open in-depth interviews. Data were subjected to a thematic latent content analysis. The results showed that having tenants with severe mental illness entails being confronted with various difficult circumstances, ranging from mismanagement of apartments to sensitivity among neighbours as well as issues regarding provocative behaviour. It involved providing assistance that was far beyond their professional obligations and to be neglected by the community-based psychiatric service system when in need of help. In order to support landlords and to prevent evictions of individuals with severe mental illness, community-based psychiatric services need to be more pro-active in their attempts to achieve collaboration with the parties at hand.
PubMed ID
23361470 View in PubMed
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Living alone with dementia: an interpretive phenomenological study with older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142787
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1698-707
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Lorna de Witt
Jenny Ploeg
Margaret Black
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. ladewitt@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1698-707
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Dementia - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Marital status
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Qualitative Research
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study of the meaning of living alone from the perspective of older people with dementia.
Risks and problems experienced by older women living alone have been investigated mostly through quantitative research. Balancing their safety and autonomy is a serious international community care dilemma. Older people's perspectives have been muted in qualitative research on living alone with dementia.
Using an interpretive phenomenological approach and van Manen's method, 14 interviews were conducted in Ontario, Canada from January 2004 to April 2005 with eight older women diagnosed with Alzheimer disease or a related dementia.
The theme holding back time expressed the temporal meaning of living alone. Pharmacological treatments represented stored time, offering the opportunity to hold back future dreaded time. Past experience with others with dementia was a context for holding on to now and facing some risks of living alone with memory loss. The women acknowledged the limited time remaining for, and identified endpoints to, living alone.
Insight into the impact of past experience with others with dementia could inform nursing assessment and advocacy for health/social services that are sensitive to the potential emotional impact of mixing people with varied levels of dementia in the same programme.
Notes
Comment In: J Adv Nurs. 2010 Sep;66(9):213820740711
PubMed ID
20557395 View in PubMed
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Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer living at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281720
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Jan;24(1):57-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Hanne Peoples
Åse Brandt
Eva E Wæhrens
Karen la Cour
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Jan;24(1):57-64
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Occupational therapy
Occupations
Qualitative Research
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
People with advanced cancer are able to live for extended periods of time. Advanced cancer can cause functional limitations influencing the ability to manage occupations. Although studies have shown that people with advanced cancer experience occupational difficulties, there is only limited research that specifically explores how these occupational difficulties are managed.
To describe and explore how people with advanced cancer manage occupations when living at home.
A sub-sample of 73 participants from a larger occupational therapy project took part in the study. The participants were consecutively recruited from a Danish university hospital. Qualitative interviews were performed at the homes of the participants. Content analysis was applied to the data.
Managing occupations were manifested in two main categories; (1) Conditions influencing occupations in everyday life and (2) Self-developed strategies to manage occupations.
The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer should be supported to a greater extent in finding ways to manage familiar as well as new and more personally meaningful occupations to enhance quality of life.
PubMed ID
27578556 View in PubMed
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Needs and care of older people living at home in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130632
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Feb;40(1):1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Sigurveig H Sigurdardottir
Gerdt Sundstrom
Bo Malmberg
Marie Ernsth Bravell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, School of Social Sciences, University of Iceland, Iceland. sighsig@hi.is
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Feb;40(1):1-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Home Care Services - utilization
Home Nursing - utilization
Humans
Iceland
Independent living
Male
Needs Assessment
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
The Icelandic old-age care system is universal and the official goal is to support older people live independently for as long as possible. The aim of this study is to analyse living conditions and use of formal and informal care of older people in Iceland.
The results are based on the new study ICEOLD, a telephone survey which included questions on social network, health, activities of daily living, and received support from the community and/or from relatives, neighbours, and friends.
Almost half of the sample (47%) receives some kind of care, with 27% of them receiving only informal care, which is understood to mean that informal care is of great importance and families are the main providers of help. For hypothetical future long-term care, older people wish to be cared for in their homes, but those already in need of assistance prefer to be cared for in institutions.
Caring relatives are the main providers of support to older people in their homes and it is important to provide them with suitable formal support when the care responsibility increases.
As the care system in Iceland is now under reconstruction, the important contribution of informal carers must be recognised and taken into account when planning the care of older people.
PubMed ID
21983193 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status and differences in medication use among older people according to ATC categories and urban-rural residency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116344
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Solveig A Arnadottir
Elin Dianna Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Akureyri, Solborg, Nordurslod, Akureyri, Iceland. arun@unak.is
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):311-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent living
Male
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Polypharmacy
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study how selected indicators of socioeconomic status and urban-rural residency associate with medication use in form of number of daily medications, polypharmacy, and medication use according to Anatomic Therapeutic Classification (ATC) system.
Cross-sectional, population-based study among older community-dwelling Icelanders. Criteria for participation were: age =65 years, community-dwelling, and able to communicate verbally and to set up a time for a face-to-face interview. Information on medication use was obtained by interviews and by examining each person's medication record. Medications were categorised according to ATC system. A questionnaire and the physical and mental health summary scales of SF-36 Health Survey were used to assess potential influential factors associated with medication use.
On average, participants (n=186) used 3.9 medications, and the prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. No indicators of socioeconomic status had significant association to any aspects of medication use. Compared to urban residents, rural residents had more diagnosed diseases, were less likely to live alone, were less likely to report having adequate income, and had fewer years of education. Controlling for these differences, urban people were more likely to use medication from the B and C categories. Moreover, older urban men, with worse physical health, and greater number of diagnosed diseases used more medications from the B category.
There are unexplained regional differences in medications use, from categories B and C, by older Icelanders. Further studies are needed on why urban residents used equal number of medications, or even more medications, compared to rural residents, despite better socioeconomic status and fewer diagnosed diseases.
PubMed ID
23406652 View in PubMed
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[The perception of seniors Francophones in a minority situation coping with the challenges and issues related to the maintenance at home in urban areas New Brunswickers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105853
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S71-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Suzanne M Dupuis-Blanchard
Majella Simard
Odette N Gould
Lita Villalon
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. suzanne.dupuis-blanchard@umoncton.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S71-4
Date
2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment
New Brunswick
Personal Satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Urban Population
Abstract
Explore the needs and the degree of satisfaction of Francophone seniors living in a minority socio-linguistic urban community in regards to aging-in-place.
An ethnographic case study was conducted in an urban community in the province of New Brunswick between October 2010 and June 2011. Individual interviews were completed with leaders of different community organizations (n=9) and focus groups were held with socio-linguistic minority French-speaking older adults (n=19).
Francophone seniors explained their willingness to age-in-place; however, the lack of services and support in the community makes aging-in-place difficult. Despite this identified absence of services, leaders of various community organizations have no plans to review current services in order to facilitate better quality of life for seniors.
Aging-in-place for French-speaking seniors living in socio-linguistic minority communities requires concerted efforts from family members, the community and the government. The Ottawa Charter of Health clearly states housing as a prerequisite of health. Housing and social support are important determinants of health. Therefore, the development and implementation of a public policy with regard to seniors, and particularly those in a socio-linguistic minority, seems fundamental in the context of population aging.
PubMed ID
24300326 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.