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The AGES-Reykjavik Study suggests that change in kidney measures is associated with subclinical brain pathology in older community-dwelling persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300494
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
M Arfan Ikram
Osorio Meirelles
Vilmundur Gudnason
Andrew S Levey
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - physiopathology - urine
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kidney - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - physiopathology - urine
Risk factors
Serum Albumin
White Matter - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Abstract
Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria may be accompanied by brain pathology. Here we investigated whether changes in these kidney measures are linked to development of new MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds, and progression of white matter hyperintensity volume. The study included 2671 participants from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (mean age 75, 58.7% women). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine, and albuminuria was assessed by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Brain MRI was acquired at baseline (2002-2006) and 5 years later (2007-2011). New MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds were counted on the follow-up scans. White matter hyperintensity progression was estimated as percent change in white matter hyperintensity volumes between the two exams. Participants with a large eGFR decline (over 3 ml/min/1.73m2 per year) had more incident subcortical infarcts (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.05, 2.22), and more marked progression of white matter hyperintensity volume (difference: 8%; 95% confidence interval: 4%, 12%), compared to participants without a large decline. Participants with incident albuminuria (over 30 mg/g) had 21% more white matter hyperintensity volume progression (95% confidence interval: 14%, 29%) and 1.86 higher odds of developing new deep microbleeds (95% confidence interval 1.16, 2.98), compared to participants without incident albuminuria. The findings were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Changes in kidney measures were not associated with occurrence of cortical infarcts. Thus, larger changes in eGFR and albuminuria are associated with increased risk for developing manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. Individuals with larger changes in these kidney measures should be considered as a high risk population for accelerated brain pathology.
PubMed ID
29960746 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular biomarkers predict fragility fractures in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299736
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Madeleine Johansson
Fabrizio Ricci
Giuseppe Di Martino
Cecilia Rogmark
Richard Sutton
Viktor Hamrefors
Olle Melander
Artur Fedorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenomedullin - blood
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular System - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Correlation of Data
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
To assess the role of four biomarkers of neuroendocrine activation and endothelial dysfunction in the longitudinal prediction of fragility fractures.
We analysed a population-based prospective cohort of 5415 community-dwelling individuals (mean age, 68.9±6.2 years) enrolled in the Malmö Preventive Project followed during 8.1±2.9 years, and investigated the longitudinal association between C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-proAVP), C-terminal endothelin-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1), the mid-regional fragments of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and incident vertebral, pelvic and extremity fractures.
Overall, 1030 (19.0%) individuals suffered vertebral, pelvic or extremity fracture. They were older (70.7±5.8 vs 68.4±6.3 years), more likely women (46.9% vs 26.3%), had lower body mass index and diastolic blood pressure, were more often on antihypertensive treatment (44.1% vs 38.4%) and had more frequently history of fracture (16.3% vs 8.1%). Higher levels of MR-proADM (adjusted HR (aHR) per 1 SD: 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p
Notes
CommentIn: Heart. 2019 Mar;105(6):427-428 PMID 30361269
PubMed ID
30322844 View in PubMed
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Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
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Combined resistance and balance-jumping exercise reduces older women's injurious falls and fractures: 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273603
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Saija Karinkanta
Pekka Kannus
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Muscle strength
Odds Ratio
Postural Balance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Resistance Training
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
previously, a randomised controlled exercise intervention study (RCT) showed that combined resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB) improved physical functioning and bone strength. The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess whether this exercise intervention had long-lasting effects in reducing injurious falls and fractures.
five-year health-care register-based follow-up study after a 1-year, four-arm RCT.
community-dwelling older women in Finland.
one hundred and forty-five of the original 149 RCT participants; women aged 70-78 years at the beginning.
participants' health-care visits were collected from computerised patient register. An injurious fall was defined as an event in which the subject contacted the health-care professionals or was taken to a hospital, due to a fall. The rate of injured fallers was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, HR), and the rate of injurious falls and fractures by Poisson regression (risk ratio, RR).
eighty-one injurious falls including 26 fractures occurred during the follow-up. The rate of injured fallers was 62% lower in COMB group compared with the controls (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85). In addition, COMB group had 51% less injurious falls (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.98) and 74% less fractures (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.97).
home-dwelling older women who participated in a 12-month intensive multi-component exercise training showed a reduced incidence for injurious falls during 5-year post-intervention period. Reduction in fractures was also evident. These long-term effects need to be confirmed in future studies.
PubMed ID
25990940 View in PubMed
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Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years--a prospective long-term follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264015
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Petra Pohl
Ellinor Nordin
Anders Lundquist
Ulrica Bergström
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Fall-related injuries in older people are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Self-reported fall events in the last year is often used to estimate fall risk in older people. However, it remains to be investigated if the fall frequency and the consequences of the falls have an impact on the risk for subsequent injurious falls in the long term. The objective of this study was to investigate if a history of one single non-injurious fall, at least two non-injurious falls, or at least one injurious fall within 12 months increases the risk of sustaining future injurious falls.
Community-dwelling individuals 75-93 years of age (n = 230) were initially followed prospectively with monthly calendars reporting falls over a period of 12 months. The participants were classified into four groups based on the number and type of falls (0, 1, =2 non-injurious falls, and =1 injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to a hospital emergency department). The participants were then followed for several years (mean time 5.0 years ±1.1) regarding injurious falls requiring a visit to the emergency department. The Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of injurious falls.
During the long-term follow-up period, thirty per cent of the participants suffered from at least one injurious fall. Those with a self-reported history of at least one injurious fall during the initial 12 months follow-up period showed a significantly higher risk for sustaining subsequent injurious falls in the long term (hazard ratio 2.78; 95% CI, 1.40-5.50) compared to those with no falls. No other group showed an increased risk.
In community-dwelling people over 75 years of age, a history of at least one self-reported injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to the emergency department within a period of 12 months implies an increased risk of sustaining future injurious falls. Our results support the recommendations to offer a multifactorial fall-risk assessment coupled with adequate interventions to community-dwelling people over 75 years who present to the ED due to an injurious fall.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25407714 View in PubMed
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Effects of the Finnish Alzheimer disease exercise trial (FINALEX): a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114708
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2013
Author
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Minna M Pöysti
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Niina Savikko
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of Primary Health Care, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@helsinki.fi
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Date
May-27-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - economics - therapy
Caregivers
Day Care - economics - organization & administration
Exercise Therapy - economics - methods - organization & administration
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
House Calls - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapists
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Few rigorous clinical trials have investigated the effectiveness of exercise on the physical functioning of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD).
To investigate the effects of intense and long-term exercise on the physical functioning and mobility of home-dwelling patients with AD and to explore its effects on the use and costs of health and social services.
A randomized controlled trial.
A total of 210 home-dwelling patients with AD living with their spousal caregiver.
The 3 trial arms included (1) group-based exercise (GE; 4-hour sessions with approximately 1-hour training) and (2) tailored home-based exercise (HE; 1-hour training), both twice a week for 1 year, and (3) a control group (CG) receiving the usual community care.
The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Short Physical Performance Battery, and information on the use and costs of social and health care services.
All groups deteriorated in functioning during the year after randomization, but deterioration was significantly faster in the CG than in the HE or GE group at 6 (P = .003) and 12 (P = .015) months. The FIM changes at 12 months were -7.1 (95% CI, -3.7 to -10.5), -10.3 (95% CI, -6.7 to -13.9), and -14.4 (95% CI, -10.9 to -18.0) in the HE group, GE group, and CG, respectively. The HE and GE groups had significantly fewer falls than the CG during the follow-up year. The total costs of health and social services for the HE patient-caregiver dyads (in US dollars per dyad per year) were $25,112 (95% CI, $17,642 to $32,581) (P = .13 for comparison with the CG), $22,066 in the GE group ($15,931 to $28,199; P = .03 vs CG), and $34,121 ($24,559 to $43,681) in the CG.
An intensive and long-term exercise program had beneficial effects on the physical functioning of patients with AD without increasing the total costs of health and social services or causing any significant adverse effects.
anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2013 Aug 20;159(4):JC1024026274
Comment In: MMW Fortschr Med. 2013 Nov 7;155(19):3224475662
Comment In: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):901-223588877
PubMed ID
23589097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors associated with hospitalization risk among community living middle aged and older persons: Results from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284013
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Sep-Oct;66:102-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jenny Hallgren
Eleonor I Fransson
Ingemar Kåreholt
Chandra A Reynolds
Nancy L Pedersen
Anna K Dahl Aslan
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Sep-Oct;66:102-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent living
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aims of the present study were to: (1) describe and compare individual characteristics of hospitalized and not hospitalized community living persons, and (2) to determine factors that are associated with hospitalization risk over time. We conducted a prospective study with a multifactorial approach based on the population-based longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). A total of 772 Swedes (mean age at baseline 69.7 years, range 46-103, 59.8% females) answered a postal questionnaire about physical and psychological health, personality and socioeconomic factors. During nine years of follow-up, information on hospitalizations and associated diagnoses were obtained from national registers. Results show that 484 persons (63%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up period. The most common causes of admission were cardiovascular diseases (25%) and tumors (22%). Cox proportional hazard regression models controlling for age, sex and dependency within twin pairs, showed that higher age (HR=1.02, p
PubMed ID
27281475 View in PubMed
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Formal home help services and institutionalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132916
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Mar-Apr;54(2):e52-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yukari Yamada
Volkert Siersma
Kirsten Avlund
Mikkel Vass
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Oester Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014, Copenhagen, Denmark. yuya@sund.ku.dk
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Mar-Apr;54(2):e52-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Housekeeping - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Institutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
The effect of home help services has been inconsistent. Raising the hypothesis that receiving small amounts of home help may postpone or prevent institutionalization, the aim of the present study is to analyze how light and heavy use of home help services was related to the risk for institutionalization. The study was a secondary analysis of a Danish intervention study on preventive home visits in 34 municipalities from 1999 to 2003, including 2642 home-dwelling older people who were nondisabled and did not receive public home help services at baseline in 1999 and who lived at home 18 months after baseline. Cox regression analysis showed that those who received home help services during the first 18 months after baseline were at higher risk of being institutionalized during the subsequent three years than those who did not receive such services. However, receiving home help for less than 1h per week during the first 18 months after baseline was not associated with an increased risk of institutionalization during the study period among those with physical or mental decline. Receiving public home help services was a strong indicator for institutionalization in Denmark. Receiving small amounts of home help and experiencing physical or mental decline was not associated with higher hazard for institutionalization compared with those who received no help.
PubMed ID
21764144 View in PubMed
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Geriatric and physically oriented rehabilitation improves the ability of independent living and physical rehabilitation reduces mortality: a randomised comparison of 538 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273948
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2015 Sep;29(9):892-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Antti Lahtinen
Juhana Leppilahti
Samppa Harmainen
Jaakko Sipilä
Riitta Antikainen
Maija-Liisa Seppänen
Reeta Willig
Hannu Vähänikkilä
Jukka Ristiniemi
Pekka Rissanen
Pekka Jalovaara
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2015 Sep;29(9):892-906
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - mortality - rehabilitation - surgery
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapy Modalities
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function - physiology
Treatment Outcome
Walking - physiology
Abstract
To examine effects of physical and geriatric rehabilitation on institutionalisation and mortality after hip fracture.
Prospective randomised study.
Physically oriented (187 patients), geriatrically oriented (171 patients), and health centre hospital rehabilitation (180 patients, control group).
A total of 538 consecutively, independently living patients with non-pathological hip fracture.
Patients were evaluated on admission, at 4 and 12 months for social status, residential status, walking ability, use of walking aids, pain in the hip, activities of daily living (ADL) and mortality.
Mortality was significantly lower at 4 and 12 months in physical rehabilitation (3.2%, 8.6%) than in geriatric rehabilitation group (9.6%, 18.7%, P=0.026, P=0.005, respectively) or control group (10.6%, 19.4%, P=0.006, P=0.004, respectively). At 4 months more patients in physical (84.4%) and geriatric rehabilitation group (78.0%) were able to live at home or sheltered housing than in control group (71.9%, P=0.0012 and P
PubMed ID
25452632 View in PubMed
Less detail

In-hospital mortality following hip fracture care in southern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140616
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Oct;53(5):294-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Khalid Alzahrani
Rajiv Gandhi
Aileen Davis
Nizar Mahomed
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Oct;53(5):294-8
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Aged
Female
Hip Fractures - mortality - surgery
Homes for the Aged
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The incidence of hip fractures is increasing within the aging population. We investigated the overall rate of in-hospital mortality following hip fracture and how this mortality rate compares across academic and community hospitals.
We reviewed prospectively collected data from 17 hospitals in southern Ontario as part of a project to evaluate a new streamlined clinical care pathway developed for acute care of elderly patients with hip fractures. We collected demographic data, prefracture living status, acute care mortality and time to surgery, and we compared these data between community and academic hospitals.
Between March 2007 and February 2008, 2178 consecutive patients were admitted with a hip fracture to 13 community and 4 academic hospitals. The mean age was 79 years and 72% were women. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 5.0%, with no difference between patients treated in academic versus community hospitals (p = 0.56). We found a greater rate of acute care in-hospital mortality for patients admitted from dependent-living facilities compared with those who were living independently (risk ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.42-0.96).
Acute care in-hospital mortality following hip fractures remains high and is consistent across academic and community hospitals. With the rising incidence of hip fractures, we need to improve the models of care for these patients to reduce mortality and to maximize functional outcomes while maintaining efficient use of limited health care resources.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20858372 View in PubMed
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