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Active living among older Canadians: a time-use perspective over 3 decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116266
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jamie E L Spinney
Hugh Millward
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Geography, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Demography
Energy Metabolism
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Exertion
Prevalence
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This research uses four nationally representative samples of time diary data, spanning almost 30 yr, that are fused with energy expenditure information to enumerate the median daily duration of moderate or vigorous effort activity, quantify the prevalence of Canadians age 65 yr and older who are meeting recommended daily levels of physical activity, and explore the factors affecting rates of active living. Results indicate that 41.1% of older Canadians met recommended levels of physical activity in 1992, 40.6% in 1998, 43.5% in 2005, and 39.6% in 2010. Both rates of active living and daily duration of aerobic activity exhibit significant differences among sociodemographic groups, with age, sex, activity limitation, urban-rural, and season exhibiting the most significant influences. This study illustrates the potential for time diary data to provide detailed surveillance of physical activity patterns, active aging research, and program development, as well.
PubMed ID
23416414 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
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Effect of Chronic Diseases and Multimorbidity on Survival and Functioning in Elderly Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286615
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 May;65(5):1056-1060
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Debora Rizzuto
René J F Melis
Sara Angleman
Chengxuan Qiu
Alessandra Marengoni
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 May;65(5):1056-1060
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the effect of chronic disorders and their co-occurrence on survival and functioning in community-dwelling older adults.
Population-based cohort study.
Kungsholmen, Stockholm, Sweden.
Individuals aged 78 and older examined by physicians four times over 11 years (N = 1,099).
Chronic diseases (grouped according to 10 organ systems according to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, code) and multimorbidity (=2 coexisting chronic diseases) were evaluated in terms of mortality, population attributable risk of death, median years of life lost, and median survival time with and without disability (need of assistance in =1 activities of daily living).
Approximately one in four deaths were attributable to cardiovascular and one in six to neuropsychiatric diseases. Malignancy was the condition with the shortest survival time (2.5 years). Malignancies and cardiovascular disorders each accounted for approximately 5 years of life lost. In contrast, neurosensorial and neuropsychiatric conditions had the longest median survival time (>6 years), and affected people were disabled for more than half of this time. The most-prevalent and -burdensome condition was multimorbidity, affecting 70.4% of the population, accounting for 69.3% of total deaths, and causing 7.5 years of life lost. Finally, people with multimorbidity lived 81% of their remaining years of life with disability (median 5.2 years).
Survival in older adults differs in length and quality depending on specific conditions. The greatest negative effect at the individual (shorter life, greater dependence) and societal (number of attributable deaths, years spent with disability) level was from multimorbidity, which has made multimorbidity a clinical and public health priority.
PubMed ID
28306158 View in PubMed
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Fatigue and depressive symptoms in older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265484
Source
J Appl Gerontol. 2014 Jun;33(4):505-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Minna Mänty
Taina Rantanen
Pertti Era
Kirsten Avlund
Source
J Appl Gerontol. 2014 Jun;33(4):505-14
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Fatigue - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Muscle Fatigue
Prevalence
Random Allocation
Abstract
Fatigue is considered an important indicator of aging-related declines in health and functional abilities. Previous studies have indicated strong associations between fatigue and depressive symptoms among younger populations and in patient groups with specific diseases. However, it is not known how different measures of fatigue are associated with depressive symptoms among general older populations. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence of depressive symptoms among community-dwelling older adults reporting mobility-related or general feelings fatigue. The study population consisted of 75-year-old community-living individuals (n = 561). Both, mobility-related and general fatigue, were associated in a stepwise relationship with depressive symptoms: a higher level of fatigue was related to higher level of depressive symptoms. Especially major general fatigue was strongly associated with high level of depressive symptoms. It is important for professionals of the field to be aware of the associations between different measures of fatigue and depressive symptoms.
PubMed ID
24781969 View in PubMed
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Impact of opioid initiation on antipsychotic and benzodiazepine and related drug use among persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300965
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 07; 30(7):947-956
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Aleksi Hamina
Piia Lavikainen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care,University of Eastern Finland,Kuopio,Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 07; 30(7):947-956
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Cognition - drug effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Interrupted Time Series Analysis
Male
Medication Adherence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacoepidemiology
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
ABSTRACTBackground:We analyzed the impact of opioid initiation on the prevalence of antipsychotic and benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
We utilized the register-based Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort for this study. We included all community-dwelling persons diagnosed with AD during 2010-2011 in Finland initiating opioid use (n = 3,327) and a matched cohort of persons not initiating opioids (n = 3,325). Interrupted time series analyses were conducted to compare the prevalence of antipsychotic and BZDR use in 30-day periods within six months before opioid initiation to 30-day periods six months later.
Before opioid initiation, prevalence of antipsychotic use among opioid initiators was 13.3%, 18.3% at opioid initiation, and 17.3% six months later. Prevalences of BZDR use were 27.1% six months prior, 28.9% at opioid initiation, and 26.9% six months later. After opioid initiation, antipsychotic and BZDR use declined by 0.3 percentage points (pps, 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.5) and 0.4 pps (0.2-0.7) per month, respectively, until the end of the follow-up. Compared to persons not initiating opioid use, opioid initiation immediately resulted in an increase in prevalence of 1.9 pps (0.9-2.8) for antipsychotics and of 1.6 pps (0.9-2.2) for BZDR use. However, in total there was a comparative decrease of 0.5 pps (0.3-0.8) per month for antipsychotics and of 0.4 pps (0.2-0.6) for BZDR use until the end of the follow-up.
Our results suggest that opioid initiation may reduce antipsychotic and BZDR use among persons with AD.
PubMed ID
29559009 View in PubMed
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Long-term use of benzodiazepines and related drugs among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270647
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cognition - drug effects
Comorbidity
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Prevalence
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use, especially long-term use, and associated factors among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). We utilized data from the MEDALZ-2005 cohort, which includes all community-dwelling individuals diagnosed with AD in Finland at the end of 2005 and matched comparison individuals without AD. Register-based data included prescription drug purchases, comorbidities, and hospital discharge diagnoses. In this study, 24,966 individuals with AD and 24,985 individuals without AD were included. During the 4-year follow-up, we found that 45% (N = 11,312) of individuals with AD and 38% (N = 9534) of individuals without AD used BZDRs. The prevalence of long-term (= 180 days) BZDR use was more common among individuals with AD (30%) than individuals without AD (26%). The median durations of the first long-term use periods of BZDRs were 1.5 and 2 years for individuals with and without AD, respectively. Factors associated with long-term BZDR use included female sex, AD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, coronary artery disease, and asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The high prevalence of long-term BZDR use among individuals with AD is especially a cause for concern because long-term use may further impair cognition and may be associated with serious adverse events.
PubMed ID
26011780 View in PubMed
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Long-term use of opioids for nonmalignant pain among community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer disease in Finland: a nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287023
Source
Pain. 2017 Feb;158(2):252-260
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Aleksi Hamina
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Niina Karttunen
Liisa Pylkkänen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Pain. 2017 Feb;158(2):252-260
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Persons with Alzheimer disease (AD) commonly present with chronic nonmalignant pain, but long-term use of opioids among this population has not been studied previously. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of long-term (=180 days) use of opioids for nonmalignant pain and associated factors among community-dwelling persons with AD and to compare the prevalence with a matched cohort without AD. The Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort was used for this study, comprising all community-dwelling persons diagnosed with AD in Finland during 2005 to 2011 and their matched comparison persons without AD. After exclusion of persons with active cancer treatment, 62,074 persons with and 62,074 persons without AD were included in this study. Data were collected from nationwide registers. Opioids were used by 13,111 persons with and by 16,659 without AD. Overall long-term opioid use was more common among persons without AD (8.7%) than among persons with AD (7.2%, P
PubMed ID
28092324 View in PubMed
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Progression of frailty and prevalence of osteoporosis in a community cohort of older women-a 10-year longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297486
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Oct; 29(10):2191-2199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
P Bartosch
F E McGuigan
K E Akesson
Author Affiliation
Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, 20502, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Oct; 29(10):2191-2199
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Disease Progression
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Frailty - epidemiology - physiopathology
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In community dwelling, 75-year-old women followed 10 years, a frailty index was created at each of three visits. Frailty score increased by ~?6-7% annually. A higher frailty score was equivalent to being 5-10 years chronologically older. Frailty was associated with low bone density and higher risk of dying.
To understand the distribution of frailty among a population-based sample of older community-dwelling women, progression over 10 years, and association with mortality and osteoporosis.
The study is performed in a cohort designed to investigate osteoporosis. The OPRA cohort consists of 75-year-old women, n?=?1044 at baseline, and follow-up at age 80 and 85. A frailty index (scored from 0.0-1.0) based on deficits in health across multiple domains was created at all time-points; outcomes were mortality up to 15 years and femoral neck bone density.
At baseline, the proportion least frail, i.e., most robust (FI 0.0-0.1) constituted 48%, dropping to 25 and 14% at age 80 and 85. On average, over 10 years, the annual linear frailty score progression was approximately 6-7%. Among the least frail, 11% remained robust over 10 years. A higher frailty score was equivalent to being 5 to 10 years older. Mortality was substantially higher in the highest quartile compared to the lowest based on baseline frailty score; after 10 years, 48.7% had died vs 17.2% (p?=?1.7?×?10-14). Mortality risk over the first 5 years was highest in the frailest (Q4 vs Q1; HRunadj 3.26 [1.86-5.73]; p?
Notes
ErratumIn: Osteoporos Int. 2019 Feb 25;: PMID 30805676
ErratumIn: Osteoporos Int. 2019 Feb 25;: PMID 30805677
PubMed ID
29947868 View in PubMed
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Systemic Estrogen Use and Discontinuation After Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis in Finland 2005-2012: A Nationwide Exposure-Matched Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297698
Source
Drugs Aging. 2018 11; 35(11):985-992
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2018
Author
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Miia Tiihonen
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Piia Lavikainen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, PL 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland. anna-maija.tolppanen@uef.fi.
Source
Drugs Aging. 2018 11; 35(11):985-992
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - psychology
Cognitive Dysfunction - etiology
Cohort Studies
Estrogens - administration & dosage
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent living
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Abstract
It is unknown whether cognitive status or diagnosed cognitive decline affects estrogen use.
We assessed how common systemic estrogen use was among community-dwellers with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a matched comparison cohort without AD.
This study included an exposure-matched cohort of all Finnish community-dwelling women who received a clinically verified diagnosis of AD in 2005-2011 (N?=?46,116; index cases) and an equally sized matched comparison cohort without AD. Follow-up began on the matching date (date of the AD diagnosis of the index case). Data on systemic estrogen use were obtained from the prescription register. Use initiation and discontinuation were assessed.
Altogether 3.1% of women with AD and 4.3% of women without AD used estrogen during the follow-up period. Only?
PubMed ID
30317535 View in PubMed
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Thirty-day prevalence of delirium among very old people: a population-based study of very old people living at home and in institutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113577
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Nov-Dec;57(3):298-304
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johan Mathillas
Birgitta Olofsson
Hugo Lövheim
Yngve Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. johan.mathillas@germed.umu.se
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Nov-Dec;57(3):298-304
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Delirium - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Institutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Delirium has mainly been studied in various patient samples and in people living in institutions. The present study investigates the 30-day prevalence of delirium in a population-based sample of very old people in northern Sweden and Finland. Seven hundred and eight persons aged 85 years and older from the GErontological Regional DAtabase (GERDA) were assessed. Information was also collected from relatives, carers and medical records. Assessments performed were among others the Organic Brain Syndrome (OBS) scale, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15). Delirium, depression and dementia diagnoses were based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria. The prevalence of delirium was 17% among 85 year-olds, 21% among 90 year-olds and 39% among participants aged 95 years and older (p
PubMed ID
23711428 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.