Skip header and navigation

Refine By

18 records – page 1 of 2.

Are high school students living in lodgings at an increased risk for internalizing problems?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98963
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Jun;33(3):439-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Wenche Wannebo
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Steinkjer, Norway. wenche.wannebo@hint.no
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Jun;33(3):439-47
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Internal-External Control
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Norway
Object Attachment
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate whether leaving home to live in lodgings during senior high school can be a risk factor for the development of internalizing problems. Utilizing two large-scale prospective community studies of 2399 and 3906 Norwegian students (age range 15-19 years), respectively, the difference in internalizing symptoms between adolescents living in lodgings and adolescents living with their parents during senior high school was examined. Female students living in lodgings had higher scores on internalizing problems than female students living at home, whereas no differences were found for males. Living in lodgings did not predict later internalizing problems, and prior internalizing problems did not predict moving into lodgings. It is therefore suggested that the negative effect of living in lodgings on high school students' well-being is temporary.
PubMed ID
19631976 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between gait speed and well-known fall risk factors among community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301605
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2019 Jan; 24(1):e1743
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Ingebjørg Lavrantsdatter Kyrdalen
Pernille Thingstad
Leiv Sandvik
Heidi Ormstad
Author Affiliation
Service of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Sande Community, Vestfold, Norway.
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2019 Jan; 24(1):e1743
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear
Female
Gait
Humans
Independent living
Male
Norway
Risk factors
Walking
Walking Speed
Abstract
Exercise interventions are effective at preventing falls in community-dwelling older adults, especially before disability is present. Gait speed below 1.0 m/s is a strong predictor for falls in the elderly. However, evidence is sparse for gait speed alone being sufficient to identify individuals at a high risk of falling. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of fall risk factors among community-dwelling older adults in their late 70s and to investigate the associations between these risk factors and low gait speed in this population.
This cross-sectional cohort study comprised 108 elderly living in a small Norwegian municipality, born between 1936 and 1938. Exclusion criteria were living in residential care, inability to walk 4 m, and severe cognitive impairment. Measurements included gait speed, depressive symptoms, executive functions, fear of falling, vision function, fall history, body mass index, medications, and comorbidity. Gait speed was dichotomized using a cut-off of 1 m/s, and associations between different risk factors and low gait speed was explored using logistic regression analysis.
Mean gait speed was 1.0 ± 0.3 m/s. In 44.4% of the participants, gait speed was below 1.0 m/s, indicating increased fall risk. Low gait speed was significantly associated with a history of multiple falls (odds ratio [OR] = 3.70, 95% CI [1.18, 11.65]), low educational level (OR = 3.58, 95% CI [1.10, 11.66]), higher number of medications (OR = 4.28, 95% CI [1.63, 11.2]), and higher number of depressive symptoms (OR = 1.31, 95% CI [1.09, 1.58]). We found no significant associations between gait speed and comorbidity, sex, vision, executive functions, or fear of falling.
Our results indicate that gait speed with cut-off 1.0 m/s could represent a useful tool for identifying individuals who are vulnerable but not yet disabled and could benefit from fall-preventive exercise. However, extended assessment is probably needed to personalize interventions.
PubMed ID
30198603 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2006 Sep;7(7):426-3116979086
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2007 Sep;59(6):591-60017727403
Cites: Res Gerontol Nurs. 2009 Jan;2(1):6-1120077988
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):793-80023701394
Cites: Clin Nurse Spec. 2013 Nov-Dec;27(6):298-30624107753
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2013 Nov;22(21-22):3032-4123815315
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Dec;61(12):2111-924479143
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;39(4):833-924296815
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2014 Aug;15(8):564-924814320
Cites: Physiother Theory Pract. 2010 May;26(4):226-3920397857
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2010 May;14(4):450-6020455121
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2010 Oct;19(19-20):2839-4820738451
Cites: Int J Older People Nurs. 2010 Sep;5(3):228-3420925706
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 2011 Sep;18(5):651-6121893576
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(3):378-9022250961
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(3):293-923323753
Cites: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-90123589097
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2007 Mar;11(2):119-3017453545
PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes to ageing among older Norwegian adults living in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283443
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-02-2017
Author
Mary H Kalfoss
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Date
May-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent living
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Attitudes toward ageing have powerful influences and impact older adults' own perception of health, quality of life and utilisation of health and social care services. This study describes attitudes to ageing among 490 Norwegian older adults living in the community who responded to The Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire. Results showed that in spite of physical changes and psychological losses, the attitudes of older adults support life acceptance with gained wisdom in feeling that there were many pleasant things about growing older and that their identity was not defined by their age. They demonstrated the ability to incorporate age-related changes within their identities and at the same time maintain a positive view of self. Although they acknowledged that old age represented a time of loss with decreasing physical independence, they meant that their lives had made a difference, they wanted to give a good example to younger persons and felt it was a privilege to grow old.
PubMed ID
28467243 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2006;4:5616934161
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2006 Apr;114(2):115-2116630302
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:4018518948
Cites: Swed Dent J. 2008;32(4):187-9519172920
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2009 Apr;37(2):97-10318782331
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2009 Jun;117(3):286-9219583757
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2010 Jan-Feb;50(1):65-819261341
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;38(4):340-720353449
Cites: J Clin Periodontol. 2010 Oct;37(10):903-920528964
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2010;8:12621050499
Cites: Gerodontology. 2012 Mar;29(1):54-6320609006
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(6):370-619626467
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2012 May;143(5):488-9522547720
Cites: Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e902-822103883
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:5022587387
Cites: J Oral Rehabil. 2013 Apr;40(4):252-723356574
Cites: Gerodontology. 2001 Dec;18(2):121-3011794738
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2004 Feb;32(1):10-814961835
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2004 Apr;32(2):107-1415061859
Cites: J Dent Res. 1997 Jun;76(6):1292-79168863
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):41-79511841
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):52-619511843
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):62-99511844
Cites: J Oral Pathol Med. 2005 Apr;34(4):193-715752252
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2005 Aug;113(4):289-9616048520
Cites: Oral Health Prev Dent. 2005;3(4):225-3516475451
Cites: Br Dent J. 2007 Jul 28;203(2):E3; discussion 100-117571092
PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Pages 515-517 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
  1 document  
Author
Jónsdóttir, S
Jonsdottir, S
Author Affiliation
Reykjavík Social Service Office, Reykjavík, Iceland
Source
Pages 515-517 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Denmark
Elderly women
Finland
Health
Iceland
Independent living
Nordic countries
Norway
Old women
Sweden
Abstract
Never before in world history have so many individuals been living alone and independently. The welfare state has made this development possible, and in the Nordic countries this is very much true for older women.
Documents
Less detail

Kynurenines as predictors of acute coronary events in the Hordaland Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272283
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015;189:18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Simone J P M Eussen
Per Magne Ueland
Stein E Vollset
Ottar Nygård
Øivind Midttun
Gerhard Sulo
Arve Ulvik
Klaus Meyer
Eva Ringdal Pedersen
Grethe S Tell
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015;189:18-24
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - blood - mortality - physiopathology
Age Factors
Aged
Angina Pectoris - blood - mortality - physiopathology
Biomarkers - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent living
Kynurenine - metabolism
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - mortality - physiopathology
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The kynurenine pathway, the main metabolic route of tryptophan degradation, has been related to inflammatory responses. Some of its metabolites, referred to as kynurenines, have been associated with prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in cross-sectional studies. This prospective study aims to investigate whether increased concentrations of kynurenines are associated with risk of acute coronary events, defined as unstable angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction, and/or sudden death in community-dwelling elderly.
The baseline examinations included 2819 individuals aged 71-74 years recruited into the Hordaland Health Study. Participants with known CHD at baseline were excluded from analyses. Baseline plasma concentrations of tryptophan, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, anthranilic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine, xanthurenic acid, and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid were measured by LC-MS/MS. During a median follow-up period of 10.8 years, with linkage to acute coronary event endpoints through the CVDNOR project, hazard ratios (HRs) for acute coronary events (n = 376) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard analyses.
After adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors, HRs (95% CI) comparing the 4th vs 1st quartile were 1.86 (1.19-2.92) for kynurenine and 1.72 (1.19-2.49) for 3-hydroxykynurenine. Tryptophan, kynurenic acid, anthranilic acid, xanthurenic acid and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid were not associated with acute coronary events.
Kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine were associated with increased risk of acute coronary events in community-dwelling elderly without a known history of CHD. These results suggest the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the early development of CHD, and their potential usefulness to estimate CHD risk.
PubMed ID
25885868 View in PubMed
Less detail

Life situation and identity among single older home-living people: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122110
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2012;7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bjørg Dale
Ulrika Söderhamn
Olle Söderhamn
Author Affiliation
Centre for Caring Research, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway. bjorg.dale@uia.no
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2012;7
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Rural Population
Self Care
Self Concept
Single Person
Social Identification
Abstract
Being able to continue living in their own home as long as possible is the general preference for many older people, and this is also in line with the public policy in the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of self-care and health for perception of life situation and identity among single-living older individuals in rural areas in southern Norway. Eleven older persons with a mean age of 78 years were interviewed and encouraged to narrate their self-care and health experiences. The interviews were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The findings are presented as a naïve reading, an inductive structural analysis characterized by two main themes; i.e., "being able to do" and "being able to be", and a comprehensive interpretation. The life situation of the interviewed single-living older individuals in rural areas in southern Norway was interpreted as inevitable, appropriate and meaningful. Their identity was constituted by their freedom and self-chosen actions in their personal contexts. The overall impression was that independence and the ability to control and govern their own life in accordance with needs and preferences were ultimate goals for the study participants.
Notes
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-810760543
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2004 Jun;18(2):145-5315147477
Cites: Theor Med. 1993 Dec;14(4):295-3038184372
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2006 May;15(5):607-1816629970
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 2006;36(2):355-7516878397
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):456-6618036008
Cites: Age Ageing. 2004 Mar;33(2):165-7014960433
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Jun;24(2):349-5620233353
Cites: Palliat Med. 2011 Sep;25(6):650-720621946
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Mar;26(1):113-2221883344
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Feb;68(4):664-7119110361
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2002 Mar-Apr;19(2):136-5111860599
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2008 Jun;45(6):818-2817540379
PubMed ID
22848230 View in PubMed
Less detail

Longitudinal changes in quality of life among elderly people with and without dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301778
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 11; 30(11):1607-1618
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-2018
Author
A E Ydstebø
S Bergh
G Selbæk
J Šaltyte Benth
K Brønnick
C Vossius
Author Affiliation
Centre for Age-related Medicine,Stavanger University Hospital,Stavanger,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 11; 30(11):1607-1618
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - complications - psychology
Depression - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Proxy
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
ABSTRACTObjective:To study longitudinal changes in the quality of life (QoL) in persons with and without dementia, and explore the factors associated with baseline QoL and changes of QoL over the follow-up period.
Prospective longitudinal study.
Data were collected from 17 municipalities in Norway in the period from January 2009 to August 2012. A total of 412 persons were included, 254 (61.7 %) persons without dementia and 158 (38.3 %) with dementia at baseline.
Persons 70 years of age or older, receiving municipal care services. Main outcome measures include the following: self-rated and proxy-rated QoL over a period of 18 months, cognitive status, functional status, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and demographics.
Longitudinal changes in QoL were small, despite changes in clinical variables. Proxy ratings of patients QoL were lower than the patients' own ratings. Belonging to a group with low QoL trajectory was associated with symptoms of depression, reduced physical and instrumental functioning, and more severe dementia.
Patients and proxies evaluated the patients' QoL differently and QoL did not necessarily correspond with deterioration in clinical parameters. To prevent impaired QoL, we need to address identified factors and keep an approach open to the individual perceptions of QoL.
PubMed ID
29747721 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nutritional self-care in two older Norwegian males: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112681
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:609-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Solveig T Tomstad
Ulrika Söderhamn
Geir Arild Espnes
Olle Söderhamn
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. solveig.t.tomstad@uia.no
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:609-20
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Nutritional Support
Questionnaires
Self Care
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Knowledge about how to support nutritional self-care in the vulnerable elderly living in their own homes is an important area for health care professionals. The aim of this case study was to evaluate the effects of nutritional intervention by comparing perceived health, sense of coherence, self-care ability, and nutritional risk in two older home-dwelling individuals before, during, and after intervention and to describe their experiences of nutritional self-care before and after intervention.
A study circle was established to support nutritional self-care in two older home-dwelling individuals (=65 years of age), who participated in three meetings arranged by health professionals over a period of six months. The effects of this study circle were evaluated using the Nutritional Form For the Elderly, the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly (SASE), the Appraisal of Self-care Agency scale, the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, and responses to a number of health-related questions. Qualitative interviews were performed before and after intervention to interpret the changes that occurred during intervention.
A reduced risk of undernutrition was found for both participants. A higher total score on the SASE was obtained for one participant, along with a slightly stronger preference for self-care to maintain sufficient food intake, was evident. For the other participant, total score on the SASE decreased, but the SOC score improved after intervention. Decreased mobility was reported, but this did not influence his food intake. The study circle was an opportunity to express personal views and opinions about food intake and meals.
An organized meeting place for dialogue between older home-dwelling individuals and health care professionals can stimulate the older person's engagement, consciousness, and learning about nutritional self-care, and thereby be of importance in reducing the risk of undernutrition.
Notes
Cites: Gerontologist. 2008 Apr;48(2):223-3418483434
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2002 Jan;37(1):28-3411784395
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2009 Apr-Jun;9(2):116619594291
Cites: J Indian Med Assoc. 2009 Jun;107(6):403-519886379
Cites: Nutr Res. 2009 Nov;29(11):761-719932864
Cites: Clin Nutr. 2010 Aug;29(4):507-1120117863
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2011 Apr;15(4):253-821437555
Cites: Int J Older People Nurs. 2012 Mar;7(1):3-1021631877
Cites: Nutrition. 2000 Jul-Aug;16(7-8):585-9010906564
Cites: Int J Nurs Pract. 2001 Oct;7(5):336-4111811432
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2001 Dec;15(6):869-8411866482
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Apr;55(4):364-7011927204
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 1993 Feb;30(1):15-238449655
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 1996;10(1):3-98715780
Cites: Int J Nurs Pract. 2012 Aug;18(4):379-8722845638
Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2012;7. doi: 10.3402/qhw.v7i0.1845622848230
Cites: Clin Interv Aging. 2012;7:383-9123049250
Cites: Int J Older People Nurs. 2013 Sep;8(3):189-9822276973
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(3):431-919191991
PubMed ID
23807843 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.