Skip header and navigation

1 records – page 1 of 1.

Leisure-time physical activity and diet quality are not associated in people with chronic spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141511
Source
Spinal Cord. 2011 Mar;49(3):381-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
K H Knight
A C Buchholz
K A Martin Ginis
R E Goy
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2011 Mar;49(3):381-5
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Guideline Adherence - trends
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Spinal Cord Injuries - diet therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cross-sectional.
To determine the association between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and adherence to Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide (CFG) in community-dwelling adults with chronic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).
Ontario, Canada.
Participants were recruited as part of the Study of Health and Activity in People with SCI (SHAPE-SCI). Dietary data were collected using 24-h recalls and analysed for adherence to CFG recommendations by age group and gender. LTPA was assessed using the Physical Activity Recall Assessment for Persons with SCI. Statistical analysis comprised correlations, multiple regression and ?(2).
We studied 75 adults (n=61 M; 42.4±11.8 years; 25.5±5.2?kg?m(-2)) with chronic (=1-year post-injury) SCI. Of these, 37% of participants were inactive, 29% were low-active and 33% were high-active. Fewer than 5% of participants were 100% adherent with CFG; 85% were adherent to =50%. Activity level and overall adherence to CFG were not correlated (r=-0.052, P=0.666). Although there were no associations between LTPA and vegetables and fruit, grain products, milk and alternatives, or other foods (all P>0.05), high activity was associated with consuming less than the minimum number of recommended servings of meat and alternatives (f=-0.258, P=0.026).
Clinicians need to be aware of the poor diet quality, and low levels of physical activity, of people with chronic SCI. They should not assume that those who are more active consume better quality diets than those who are low active or inactive.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
PubMed ID
20714337 View in PubMed
Less detail