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A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300956
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ilse A C Arnoldussen
Valter Sundh
Kristoffer Bäckman
Silke Kern
Svante Östling
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Ingmar Skoog
Amanda J Kiliaan
Deborah R Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adiposity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Dementia - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Fasting
Female
Humans
Independent living
Leptin - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Adiposity measured in mid- or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.
We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.
924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.
Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (
PubMed ID
29758945 View in PubMed
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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
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Dietary resilience as described by older community-dwelling adults from the NuAge study "if there is a will -there is a way!".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128482
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Elisabeth Vesnaver
Heather H Keller
Hélène Payette
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
University of Guelph, Department of Family Relations and Applied Human Nutrition, Macdonald Institute, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Diet
Eating - physiology
Female
Food - economics
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Many older adults experience age-related changes that can have negative consequences for food intake. Some older adults continue to eat well despite these challenges showing dietary resilience. We aimed to describe the strategies used by older adults to overcome dietary obstacles and to explore the key themes of dietary resilience. The sample was drawn from the five-year Québec Longitudinal Study "NuAge". It included 30 participants (80% female) aged 73-87 years; 10 with decreased diet quality and 20 with steady or increased diet quality; all had faced key barriers to eating well. Semi-structured interviews explored how age-related changes affected participants' experiences with eating. Thematic analysis revealed strategies used to overcome eating, shopping, and meal preparation difficulties. Key themes of dietary resilience were: prioritizing eating well, doing whatever it takes to keep eating well, being able to do it yourself, getting help when you need it. Implications for health professionals are discussed.
PubMed ID
22200412 View in PubMed
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Effect of Chronic Diseases and Multimorbidity on Survival and Functioning in Elderly Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286615
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 May;65(5):1056-1060
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Debora Rizzuto
René J F Melis
Sara Angleman
Chengxuan Qiu
Alessandra Marengoni
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 May;65(5):1056-1060
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the effect of chronic disorders and their co-occurrence on survival and functioning in community-dwelling older adults.
Population-based cohort study.
Kungsholmen, Stockholm, Sweden.
Individuals aged 78 and older examined by physicians four times over 11 years (N = 1,099).
Chronic diseases (grouped according to 10 organ systems according to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, code) and multimorbidity (=2 coexisting chronic diseases) were evaluated in terms of mortality, population attributable risk of death, median years of life lost, and median survival time with and without disability (need of assistance in =1 activities of daily living).
Approximately one in four deaths were attributable to cardiovascular and one in six to neuropsychiatric diseases. Malignancy was the condition with the shortest survival time (2.5 years). Malignancies and cardiovascular disorders each accounted for approximately 5 years of life lost. In contrast, neurosensorial and neuropsychiatric conditions had the longest median survival time (>6 years), and affected people were disabled for more than half of this time. The most-prevalent and -burdensome condition was multimorbidity, affecting 70.4% of the population, accounting for 69.3% of total deaths, and causing 7.5 years of life lost. Finally, people with multimorbidity lived 81% of their remaining years of life with disability (median 5.2 years).
Survival in older adults differs in length and quality depending on specific conditions. The greatest negative effect at the individual (shorter life, greater dependence) and societal (number of attributable deaths, years spent with disability) level was from multimorbidity, which has made multimorbidity a clinical and public health priority.
PubMed ID
28306158 View in PubMed
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Longitudinal changes in quality of life among elderly people with and without dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301778
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 11; 30(11):1607-1618
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-2018
Author
A E Ydstebø
S Bergh
G Selbæk
J Šaltyte Benth
K Brønnick
C Vossius
Author Affiliation
Centre for Age-related Medicine,Stavanger University Hospital,Stavanger,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 11; 30(11):1607-1618
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - complications - psychology
Depression - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Proxy
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
ABSTRACTObjective:To study longitudinal changes in the quality of life (QoL) in persons with and without dementia, and explore the factors associated with baseline QoL and changes of QoL over the follow-up period.
Prospective longitudinal study.
Data were collected from 17 municipalities in Norway in the period from January 2009 to August 2012. A total of 412 persons were included, 254 (61.7 %) persons without dementia and 158 (38.3 %) with dementia at baseline.
Persons 70 years of age or older, receiving municipal care services. Main outcome measures include the following: self-rated and proxy-rated QoL over a period of 18 months, cognitive status, functional status, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and demographics.
Longitudinal changes in QoL were small, despite changes in clinical variables. Proxy ratings of patients QoL were lower than the patients' own ratings. Belonging to a group with low QoL trajectory was associated with symptoms of depression, reduced physical and instrumental functioning, and more severe dementia.
Patients and proxies evaluated the patients' QoL differently and QoL did not necessarily correspond with deterioration in clinical parameters. To prevent impaired QoL, we need to address identified factors and keep an approach open to the individual perceptions of QoL.
PubMed ID
29747721 View in PubMed
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Longitudinal changes in serum lipids in older people the Turku elderly study 1991-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137747
Source
Age Ageing. 2011 Mar;40(2):280-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011

Mobility Limitation and Changes in Personal Goals Among Older Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271854
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2016 Jan;71(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Milla Saajanaho
Anne Viljanen
Sanna Read
Johanna Eronen
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Taina Rantanen
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2016 Jan;71(1):1-10
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Goals
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Psychomotor Performance
Abstract
Several theoretical viewpoints suggest that older adults need to modify their personal goals in the face of functional decline. The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinally the association of mobility limitation with changes in personal goals among older women.
Eight-year follow-up of 205 women aged 66-78 years at baseline.
Health-related goals were the most common at both measurements. Goals related to independent living almost doubled and goals related to exercise and to cultural activities substantially decreased during the follow-up. Higher age decreased the likelihood for engaging in new goals related to cultural activities and disengaging from goals related to independent living. Women who had developed mobility limitation during the follow-up were less likely to engage in new goals related to exercise and more likely to disengage from goals related to cultural activities and to health and functioning.
The results of this study support theories suggesting that age-related losses such as mobility limitation may result in older adults modifying or disengaging from personal goals.
PubMed ID
25123689 View in PubMed
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Modifiable midlife risk factors, independent aging, and survival in older men: report on long-term follow-up of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265380
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 May;63(5):877-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Kristin Franzon
Björn Zethelius
Tommy Cederholm
Lena Kilander
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 May;63(5):877-85
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Independent living
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine relationships between modifiable midlife factors, aging, and physical and cognitive function (independent aging) and survival in very old age.
Prospective cohort.
Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, Uppsala, Sweden.
Swedish men investigated in 1970-74 (aged 48.6-51.1) and followed up for four decades (N=2,293).
Conventional cardiovascular risk factors, body mass index (BMI), and dietary biomarkers were measured, and a questionnaire was used to gather information on lifestyle variables at age 50. Four hundred seventy-two men were reinvestigated in 2008-09 (aged 84.8-88.9). Independent aging was defined as survival to age 85, Mini-Mental State Examination score of 25 or greater, not living in an institution, independent in personal care and hygiene, able to walk outdoors without personal help, and no diagnosis of dementia. The National Swedish Death Registry provided survival data.
Thirty-eight percent of the cohort survived to age 85. Seventy-four percent of the participants in 2008-09 were aging independently. In univariable analyses, high leisure-time physical activity predicted survival but not independent aging. Low work-time physical activity was associated more strongly with independent aging (odds ratio (OR)=1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.18-2.88) than with survival (OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.05-1.52). In multivariable analyses, midlife BMI was negatively associated (OR=0.80/SD, 95% CI=0.65-0.99/SD), and never or former smoking was positively associated (OR=1.66, 95% CI=1.07-2.59), with independent aging. As expected, conventional cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors were associated with mortality.
A normal midlife BMI and not smoking were associated with independent aging close to four decades later, indicating that normal weight at midlife has the potential not only to increase survival, but also to preserve independence with aging.
PubMed ID
25919442 View in PubMed
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Older men's lay definitions of successful aging over time: the Manitoba follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108708
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2013;76(4):297-322
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Robert B Tate
Audrey U Swift
Dennis J Bayomi
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Robert.Tate@med.umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2013;76(4):297-322
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Gender Identity
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Population Dynamics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Retirement
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
The concept of "successful aging" has become widely accepted in gerontology, yet continues to have no common underlying definition. Researchers have increasingly looked to older individuals for their lay definitions of successful aging. The present analysis is based on responses to five questionnaires administered to surviving participants of the male Manitoba Follow-up Study cohort (www.mfus.ca) in 1996, 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006 (n = 2,043 men were alive at a mean age of 78 years in 1996). One question on each survey asked: "What is YOUR definition of successful aging?" Applying content analysis to the 5,898 narratives received over the 11 years, we developed a coding system encompassing 21 main themes and 86 sub-themes defining successful aging. We quantitatively analyzed trends in prevalence of themes of successful aging prospectively over time. Our findings empirically support colleagues' past suggestions to shift from defining successful aging in primarily biomedical terms, by taking lay views into account.
PubMed ID
23855184 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.