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A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300956
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ilse A C Arnoldussen
Valter Sundh
Kristoffer Bäckman
Silke Kern
Svante Östling
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Ingmar Skoog
Amanda J Kiliaan
Deborah R Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adiposity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Dementia - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Fasting
Female
Humans
Independent living
Leptin - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Adiposity measured in mid- or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.
We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.
924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.
Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (
PubMed ID
29758945 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
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The AGES-Reykjavik Study suggests that change in kidney measures is associated with subclinical brain pathology in older community-dwelling persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300494
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
M Arfan Ikram
Osorio Meirelles
Vilmundur Gudnason
Andrew S Levey
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - physiopathology - urine
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kidney - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - physiopathology - urine
Risk factors
Serum Albumin
White Matter - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Abstract
Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria may be accompanied by brain pathology. Here we investigated whether changes in these kidney measures are linked to development of new MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds, and progression of white matter hyperintensity volume. The study included 2671 participants from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (mean age 75, 58.7% women). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine, and albuminuria was assessed by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Brain MRI was acquired at baseline (2002-2006) and 5 years later (2007-2011). New MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds were counted on the follow-up scans. White matter hyperintensity progression was estimated as percent change in white matter hyperintensity volumes between the two exams. Participants with a large eGFR decline (over 3 ml/min/1.73m2 per year) had more incident subcortical infarcts (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.05, 2.22), and more marked progression of white matter hyperintensity volume (difference: 8%; 95% confidence interval: 4%, 12%), compared to participants without a large decline. Participants with incident albuminuria (over 30 mg/g) had 21% more white matter hyperintensity volume progression (95% confidence interval: 14%, 29%) and 1.86 higher odds of developing new deep microbleeds (95% confidence interval 1.16, 2.98), compared to participants without incident albuminuria. The findings were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Changes in kidney measures were not associated with occurrence of cortical infarcts. Thus, larger changes in eGFR and albuminuria are associated with increased risk for developing manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. Individuals with larger changes in these kidney measures should be considered as a high risk population for accelerated brain pathology.
PubMed ID
29960746 View in PubMed
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Aging in rural Canada: a retrospective and review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132883
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Norah Keating
Jennifer Swindle
Stephanie Fletcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta. Norah.keating@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Family
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities
Research
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Social Participation
Social Support
Work
Abstract
Research on rural aging has developed considerably since publication of the book Aging in Rural Canada (Butterworths, 1991). The purpose of this article is twofold: to provide a retrospective on issues in rural aging from this book, and to review Canadian literature on rural aging since its publication. The review highlights new directions in conceptual definitions of rural, and in issues of social engagement, independence, family and social networks, and rural services and health. Two main research lenses are evident. The marginalization lens focuses on rural seniors with health problems, but has not included those marginalized by poverty or gender. The aging-well lens focuses on contributions and engagement, but has omitted research on social relationships and quality of family interaction. The report includes a call for interrogation about interaction between people and place, and for understanding issues of rural diversity and processes of rural aging.
PubMed ID
21767464 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias in relation to mild hypokalaemia and prognosis in community dwelling middle-aged and elderly subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281049
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Nick Mattsson
Golnaz Sadjadieh
Preman Kumarathurai
Olav Wendelboe Nielsen
Lars Køber
Ahmad Sajadieh
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Atrial Premature Complexes - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Biomarkers - blood
Denmark
Disease-Free Survival
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Hypokalemia - blood - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Time Factors
Ventricular Premature Complexes - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Abstract
Severe hypokalaemia can aggravate arrhythmia tendency and prognosis, but less is known about risk of mild hypokalaemia, which is a frequent finding. We examined the associations between mild hypokalaemia and ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias and their prognosis.
Subjects from the cohort of the 'Copenhagen Holter Study' (n = 671), with no history of manifest cardiovascular (CV) disease or stroke, were studied. All had laboratory tests and 48-h ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The median follow-up was 6.3 years. p-Potassium was inversely associated with frequency of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) especially in combination with diuretic treatment (r = -0.22, P = 0.015). Hypokalaemia was not associated with supraventricular arrhythmias. Subjects at lowest quintile of p-potassium (mean 3.42, range 2.7-3.6 mmol/L) were defined as hypokalaemic. Cardiovascular mortality was higher in the hypokalaemic group (hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals: 2.62 (1.11-6.18) after relevant adjustments). Hypokalaemia in combination with excessive PVC worsened the prognosis synergistically; event rates: 83 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with both abnormalities, 10 and 15 per 1000 patient-year in those with one abnormality, and 3 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with no abnormality. One variable combining hypokalaemia with excessive supraventricular arrhythmias gave similar results in univariate analysis, but not after multivariate adjustments.
In middle-aged and elderly subjects with no manifest heart disease, mild hypokalaemia is associated with increased rate of ventricular but not supraventricular arrhythmias. Hypokalaemia interacts synergistically with increased ventricular ectopy to increase the risk of adverse events.
PubMed ID
26293625 View in PubMed
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An evaluation by elderly people living at home of the prepared meals distributed by their municipality - a study with focus on the Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264566
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2015 May;7(3):59-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Oleg Pajalic
Zada Pajalic
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2015 May;7(3):59-68
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Consumer Behavior
Female
Food Services
Home Care Services
Homebound Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent living
Male
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Prepared meals distributed by municipalities is a service to elderly people, or persons with health related impairments, who live in their own home, have difficulties preparing their own food and cannot meet their food requirements in any other way. This study aimed to provide a brief picture of how elderly people living at home perceive the food they receive through their municipal food service and what is important to them. The data was collected using questionnaires. 274 out of 276 participants answered the questionnaire (n=173 women 62% and n=101 man 37%). The data was analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The results showed that the elderly persons receiving meals through the service were often satisfied, especially with the size of the portions and the delivery time. Those who had been using the food delivery service for a longer time were not satisfied with the alternative dishes they were been offered. There was no significant difference between the views of either gender. Further, those who were receiving special food were, in general, unsatisfied with the meals delivered. Development of the food distribution service by systematic quality insurance and interactive knowledge exchange between the producers and consumers seems to be a way to promote a more holistic and individual adjusted service. Evaluation of the municipal FD service is a powerful tool that can contribute to the development of this service. The food service can be improved and consequently even the quality of life and health of its receivers. The present survey should be revisited and developed in order to detect differences between genders.
PubMed ID
25948451 View in PubMed
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Anticholinergic burden and dry mouth among Finnish, community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294919
Source
Gerodontology. 2018 Mar; 35(1):3-10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Antti Tiisanoja
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Kaija Komulainen
Pasi Lampela
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka Ylöstalo
Author Affiliation
Unit of Oral Health Sciences Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Gerodontology. 2018 Mar; 35(1):3-10
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Poisson Distribution
Saliva - secretion
Xerostomia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was to study whether the anticholinergic burden of drugs is related to xerostomia and salivary secretion among community-dwelling elderly people.
Anticholinergic drugs have been shown to be a risk factor for dry mouth, but little is known about the effects of cumulative exposure to anticholinergic drugs measured by anticholinergic burden on salivary secretion or xerostomia.
The study population consisted of 152 community-dwelling, dentate, non-smoking, older people from the Oral Health GeMS study. The data were collected by interviews and clinical examinations. Anticholinergic burden was determined using the Anticholinergic Drug Scale (ADS). A Poisson regression model with robust error variance was used to estimate relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI 95%).
Participants with a high-anticholinergic burden (ADS = 3) were more likely to have xerostomia (RR: 3.17; CI: 1.44-6.96), low-unstimulated salivary flow (
PubMed ID
28940566 View in PubMed
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Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
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Associations between gait speed and well-known fall risk factors among community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301605
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2019 Jan; 24(1):e1743
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Ingebjørg Lavrantsdatter Kyrdalen
Pernille Thingstad
Leiv Sandvik
Heidi Ormstad
Author Affiliation
Service of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Sande Community, Vestfold, Norway.
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2019 Jan; 24(1):e1743
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear
Female
Gait
Humans
Independent living
Male
Norway
Risk factors
Walking
Walking Speed
Abstract
Exercise interventions are effective at preventing falls in community-dwelling older adults, especially before disability is present. Gait speed below 1.0 m/s is a strong predictor for falls in the elderly. However, evidence is sparse for gait speed alone being sufficient to identify individuals at a high risk of falling. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of fall risk factors among community-dwelling older adults in their late 70s and to investigate the associations between these risk factors and low gait speed in this population.
This cross-sectional cohort study comprised 108 elderly living in a small Norwegian municipality, born between 1936 and 1938. Exclusion criteria were living in residential care, inability to walk 4 m, and severe cognitive impairment. Measurements included gait speed, depressive symptoms, executive functions, fear of falling, vision function, fall history, body mass index, medications, and comorbidity. Gait speed was dichotomized using a cut-off of 1 m/s, and associations between different risk factors and low gait speed was explored using logistic regression analysis.
Mean gait speed was 1.0 ± 0.3 m/s. In 44.4% of the participants, gait speed was below 1.0 m/s, indicating increased fall risk. Low gait speed was significantly associated with a history of multiple falls (odds ratio [OR] = 3.70, 95% CI [1.18, 11.65]), low educational level (OR = 3.58, 95% CI [1.10, 11.66]), higher number of medications (OR = 4.28, 95% CI [1.63, 11.2]), and higher number of depressive symptoms (OR = 1.31, 95% CI [1.09, 1.58]). We found no significant associations between gait speed and comorbidity, sex, vision, executive functions, or fear of falling.
Our results indicate that gait speed with cut-off 1.0 m/s could represent a useful tool for identifying individuals who are vulnerable but not yet disabled and could benefit from fall-preventive exercise. However, extended assessment is probably needed to personalize interventions.
PubMed ID
30198603 View in PubMed
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Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
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110 records – page 1 of 11.