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Aspects of housing and perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older people in three national samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113316
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Signe Tomsone
Vibeke Horstmann
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. Signe.Tomsone@med.lu.se
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Germany
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Latvia
Male
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
Good housing solutions are important for the ageing population in order to promote health and maintain functional ability. The objective of this study was to investigate whether and how objective and perceived aspects of housing were related to perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older, single-living people within three national samples.
The current study was based on national samples (German, n = 450; Latvian, n = 303; Swedish, n = 397) from the European ENABLE-AGE Project, using data on ADL dependence, perceived health, objective and perceived aspects of housing. Descriptive statistics, correlations and multivariate ordinal regression models were used to analyze the data.
The participants in the ADL dependent groups generally were older, had more functional limitations and perceived their health as poorer compared to ADL independent groups. With regard to perceived housing, usability as well as meaning of home indicators was often lower in the ADL dependent groups, housing satisfaction was at the same level while housing-related external control beliefs were higher. The differences among the national samples were highly significant for both ADL groups, for all variables except number of outdoor environmental barriers in the ADL independent groups. The relations between perceived health on one hand and objective and perceived aspects of housing on the other show great diversities among the ADL groups and the national samples.
The results serve to alert health care practitioners that it is important to draw attention to how older people perceive their housing situation and to the fact that different levels of functional independence demand different interventions.
PubMed ID
23740591 View in PubMed
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Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
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Change in psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling people aged 75 years and older in Finland: repeated cross-sectional population studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134674
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Franciska Desplenter
Charlotte Caenen
Jolein Meelberghs
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
J Simon Bell
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Oct;23(8):1278-84
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Older people are at high risk of experiencing psychotropic-related adverse drug events. The objective of this study was to compare and contrast the use of psychotropic drugs among community-dwelling people aged = 75 years in 1998 and 2004.
Comparable random samples of people aged = 75 years were extracted from the population register in Kuopio, Finland, in 1998 (n = 700) and 2003 (n = 1000). In 1998 and 2004, 523 and 700 community-dwelling people respectively participated in nurse interviews, during which demographic, diagnostic and drug use data were elicited. Logistic regression was used to compute unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the prevalence of psychotropic drug use in 2004 compared to 1998.
The unadjusted prevalence of total psychotropic (37.3% and 38.4%, OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.83-1.33), anxiolytic, hypnotic and sedative (29.6% and 31.3%, OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.85-1.38), and antidepressant (10.7% and 11.9%, OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.78-1.61) use were similar in 1998 and 2004. There was a decrease in the unadjusted prevalence of antipsychotic use (9.2% and 5.7%, OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.39-0.93). After adjusting for socioeconomic and health status differences, there was an increase in the prevalence of total psychotropic (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.01-1.70) and antidepressant (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.06-2.40) use.
The unadjusted prevalence of psychotropic drug use remained stable between 1998 and 2004. However, in adjusted analyses there was a small increase in the prevalence of any psychotropic drug use and antidepressant use specifically.
PubMed ID
21554797 View in PubMed
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Concern about falling in older women with a history of falls: associations with health, functional ability, physical activity and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106791
Source
Gerontology. 2014;60(1):22-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Radhika Patil
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Pekka Kannus
Saija Karinkanta
Harri Sievänen
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Gerontology. 2014;60(1):22-30
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Fear - psychology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Logistic Models
Motor Activity
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Fear of falling has been linked to activity restriction, functional decline, decreased quality of life and increased risk of falling. Factors that distinguish persons with a high concern about falling from those with low concern have not been systematically studied.
This study aimed to expose potential health-related, functional and psychosocial factors that correlate with fear of falling among independently living older women who had fallen in the past year.
Baseline data of 409 women aged 70-80 years recruited to a randomised falls prevention trial (DEX) (NCT00986466) were used. Participants were classified according to their level of concern about falling using the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I). Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to explore associations between health-related variables, functional performance tests, amount of physical activity, quality of life and FES-I scores.
68% of the participants reported a moderate to high concern (FES-I = 20) about falls. Multinomial logistic regression showed that highly concerned women were significantly more likely to have poorer health and quality of life and lower functional ability. Reported difficulties in instrumental activities of daily living, balance, outdoor mobility and poorer quality of life contributed independently to a greater concern about falling.
Concern about falling was highly prevalent in our sample of community-living older women. In particular, poor perceived general health and mobility constraints contributed independently to the difference between high and low concern of falling. Knowledge of these associations may help in developing interventions to reduce fear of falling and activity avoidance in old age.
PubMed ID
24107382 View in PubMed
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Dietary resilience as described by older community-dwelling adults from the NuAge study "if there is a will -there is a way!".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128482
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Elisabeth Vesnaver
Heather H Keller
Hélène Payette
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
University of Guelph, Department of Family Relations and Applied Human Nutrition, Macdonald Institute, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Diet
Eating - physiology
Female
Food - economics
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Many older adults experience age-related changes that can have negative consequences for food intake. Some older adults continue to eat well despite these challenges showing dietary resilience. We aimed to describe the strategies used by older adults to overcome dietary obstacles and to explore the key themes of dietary resilience. The sample was drawn from the five-year Québec Longitudinal Study "NuAge". It included 30 participants (80% female) aged 73-87 years; 10 with decreased diet quality and 20 with steady or increased diet quality; all had faced key barriers to eating well. Semi-structured interviews explored how age-related changes affected participants' experiences with eating. Thematic analysis revealed strategies used to overcome eating, shopping, and meal preparation difficulties. Key themes of dietary resilience were: prioritizing eating well, doing whatever it takes to keep eating well, being able to do it yourself, getting help when you need it. Implications for health professionals are discussed.
PubMed ID
22200412 View in PubMed
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Examining the relationship between communities' 'age-friendliness' and life satisfaction and self-perceived health in rural Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256516
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2594
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Verena H Menec
Scott Nowicki
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. verena.menec@med.umanitoba.ca.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14:2594
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Manitoba
Personal Satisfaction
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Transportation
Abstract
Population aging is a worldwide phenomenon. As a response, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the concept of 'age-friendliness' in 2006. Age-friendliness is defined in terms of a range of domains, such as housing, opportunities for participation, and transportation. Communities that accommodate the needs of older adults in these domains will, it is thought, promote healthy, active aging. The purpose of the present study was to examine communities' age-friendliness and its relationship to health-related outcomes in a rural context.
The study included 29 communities located in Manitoba, a mid-Western Canadian province, that are part of the Province of Manitoba's Age-Friendly Manitoba Initiative. As part of a needs assessment process in these communities, 593 individuals, including seniors and younger adults, completed an Age-Friendly Survey. The survey was designed to measure a variety of features in seven domains (the physical environment, housing options, the social environment, opportunities for participation, community supports and healthcare services, transportation options, and communication and information), as well as containing measures of life satisfaction and self-perceived health. Community characteristics were derived from census data. Moreover, communities were categorized on a rural-urban continuum.
Multi-level regressions indicated that an overall Age-Friendly Index was positively related to both life satisfaction (b=0.019, p
PubMed ID
24437338 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with active aging in Finland, Poland, and Spain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260487
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2014 Aug;26(8):1363-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Perales J
Martin S
Ayuso-Mateos JL
Chatterji S
Garin N
Koskinen S
Leonardi M
Miret M
Moneta V
Olaya B
Tobiasz-Adamczyk B
Haro JM
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2014 Aug;26(8):1363-75
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Ethnopsychology - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Poland - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
Continuous population aging has raised international policy interest in promoting active aging (AA). AA theoretical models have been defined from a biomedical or a psychosocial perspective. These models may be expanded including components suggested by lay individuals. This paper aims to study the correlates of AA in three European countries, namely, Spain, Poland, and Finland using four different definitions of AA.
The EU COURAGE in Europe project was a cross-sectional general adult population survey conducted in a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized population of Finland, Poland, and Spain. Participants (10,800) lived in the community. This analysis focuses on individuals aged 50 years old and over (7,987). Four definitions (two biomedical, one psychosocial, and a complete definition including biomedical, psychosocial, and external variables) of AA were analyzed.
Differences in AA were found for country, age, education, and occupation. Finland scored consistently the highest in AA followed by Spain and Poland. Younger age was associated with higher AA. Higher education and occupation was associated with AA. Being married or cohabiting was associated with better AA compared to being widowed or separated in most definitions. Gender and urbanicity were not associated with AA, with few exceptions. Men scored higher in AA only in Spain, whereas there was no gender association in the other two countries. Being widowed was only associated with lower AA in Poland and not being married was associated with lower AA in Poland and Finland but not Spain.
Associations with education, marital status, and occupation suggest that these factors are the most important components of AA. These association patterns, however, seem to vary across the three countries. Actions to promote AA in these countries may be addressed at reducing inequalities in occupation and education or directly tackling the components of AA lacking in each country.
PubMed ID
24735743 View in PubMed
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Heterogeneity of Characteristics among Housing Adaptation Clients in Sweden--Relationship to Participation and Self-Rated Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275389
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Björg Thordardottir
Carlos Chiatti
Lisa Ekstam
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the paper was to explore the heterogeneity among housing adaptation clients. Cluster analysis was performed using baseline data from applicants in three Swedish municipalities. The analysis identified six main groups: "adults at risk of disability", "young old with disabilities", "well-functioning older adults", "frail older adults", "frail older with moderate cognitive impairments" and "resilient oldest old". The clusters differed significantly in terms of participation frequency and satisfaction in and outside the home as well as in terms of self-rated health. The identification of clusters in a heterogeneous sample served the purpose of finding groups with different characteristics, including participation and self-rated health which could be used to facilitate targeted home-based interventions. The findings indicate that housing adaptions should take person/environment/activity specific characteristics into consideration so that they may fully serve the purpose of facilitating independent living, as well as enhancing participation and health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26729145 View in PubMed
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Living alone with dementia: an interpretive phenomenological study with older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142787
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1698-707
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Lorna de Witt
Jenny Ploeg
Margaret Black
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. ladewitt@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1698-707
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Dementia - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Marital status
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Qualitative Research
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study of the meaning of living alone from the perspective of older people with dementia.
Risks and problems experienced by older women living alone have been investigated mostly through quantitative research. Balancing their safety and autonomy is a serious international community care dilemma. Older people's perspectives have been muted in qualitative research on living alone with dementia.
Using an interpretive phenomenological approach and van Manen's method, 14 interviews were conducted in Ontario, Canada from January 2004 to April 2005 with eight older women diagnosed with Alzheimer disease or a related dementia.
The theme holding back time expressed the temporal meaning of living alone. Pharmacological treatments represented stored time, offering the opportunity to hold back future dreaded time. Past experience with others with dementia was a context for holding on to now and facing some risks of living alone with memory loss. The women acknowledged the limited time remaining for, and identified endpoints to, living alone.
Insight into the impact of past experience with others with dementia could inform nursing assessment and advocacy for health/social services that are sensitive to the potential emotional impact of mixing people with varied levels of dementia in the same programme.
Notes
Comment In: J Adv Nurs. 2010 Sep;66(9):213820740711
PubMed ID
20557395 View in PubMed
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Nutritional self-care in two older Norwegian males: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112681
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:609-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Solveig T Tomstad
Ulrika Söderhamn
Geir Arild Espnes
Olle Söderhamn
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. solveig.t.tomstad@uia.no
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:609-20
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Nutritional Support
Questionnaires
Self Care
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Knowledge about how to support nutritional self-care in the vulnerable elderly living in their own homes is an important area for health care professionals. The aim of this case study was to evaluate the effects of nutritional intervention by comparing perceived health, sense of coherence, self-care ability, and nutritional risk in two older home-dwelling individuals before, during, and after intervention and to describe their experiences of nutritional self-care before and after intervention.
A study circle was established to support nutritional self-care in two older home-dwelling individuals (=65 years of age), who participated in three meetings arranged by health professionals over a period of six months. The effects of this study circle were evaluated using the Nutritional Form For the Elderly, the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly (SASE), the Appraisal of Self-care Agency scale, the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, and responses to a number of health-related questions. Qualitative interviews were performed before and after intervention to interpret the changes that occurred during intervention.
A reduced risk of undernutrition was found for both participants. A higher total score on the SASE was obtained for one participant, along with a slightly stronger preference for self-care to maintain sufficient food intake, was evident. For the other participant, total score on the SASE decreased, but the SOC score improved after intervention. Decreased mobility was reported, but this did not influence his food intake. The study circle was an opportunity to express personal views and opinions about food intake and meals.
An organized meeting place for dialogue between older home-dwelling individuals and health care professionals can stimulate the older person's engagement, consciousness, and learning about nutritional self-care, and thereby be of importance in reducing the risk of undernutrition.
Notes
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