Skip header and navigation

Refine By

62 records – page 1 of 7.

Ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias in relation to mild hypokalaemia and prognosis in community dwelling middle-aged and elderly subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281049
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Nick Mattsson
Golnaz Sadjadieh
Preman Kumarathurai
Olav Wendelboe Nielsen
Lars Køber
Ahmad Sajadieh
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Atrial Premature Complexes - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Biomarkers - blood
Denmark
Disease-Free Survival
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Hypokalemia - blood - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Time Factors
Ventricular Premature Complexes - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Abstract
Severe hypokalaemia can aggravate arrhythmia tendency and prognosis, but less is known about risk of mild hypokalaemia, which is a frequent finding. We examined the associations between mild hypokalaemia and ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias and their prognosis.
Subjects from the cohort of the 'Copenhagen Holter Study' (n = 671), with no history of manifest cardiovascular (CV) disease or stroke, were studied. All had laboratory tests and 48-h ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The median follow-up was 6.3 years. p-Potassium was inversely associated with frequency of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) especially in combination with diuretic treatment (r = -0.22, P = 0.015). Hypokalaemia was not associated with supraventricular arrhythmias. Subjects at lowest quintile of p-potassium (mean 3.42, range 2.7-3.6 mmol/L) were defined as hypokalaemic. Cardiovascular mortality was higher in the hypokalaemic group (hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals: 2.62 (1.11-6.18) after relevant adjustments). Hypokalaemia in combination with excessive PVC worsened the prognosis synergistically; event rates: 83 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with both abnormalities, 10 and 15 per 1000 patient-year in those with one abnormality, and 3 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with no abnormality. One variable combining hypokalaemia with excessive supraventricular arrhythmias gave similar results in univariate analysis, but not after multivariate adjustments.
In middle-aged and elderly subjects with no manifest heart disease, mild hypokalaemia is associated with increased rate of ventricular but not supraventricular arrhythmias. Hypokalaemia interacts synergistically with increased ventricular ectopy to increase the risk of adverse events.
PubMed ID
26293625 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2006 Sep;7(7):426-3116979086
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2007 Sep;59(6):591-60017727403
Cites: Res Gerontol Nurs. 2009 Jan;2(1):6-1120077988
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):793-80023701394
Cites: Clin Nurse Spec. 2013 Nov-Dec;27(6):298-30624107753
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2013 Nov;22(21-22):3032-4123815315
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Dec;61(12):2111-924479143
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;39(4):833-924296815
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2014 Aug;15(8):564-924814320
Cites: Physiother Theory Pract. 2010 May;26(4):226-3920397857
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2010 May;14(4):450-6020455121
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2010 Oct;19(19-20):2839-4820738451
Cites: Int J Older People Nurs. 2010 Sep;5(3):228-3420925706
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 2011 Sep;18(5):651-6121893576
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(3):378-9022250961
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(3):293-923323753
Cites: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-90123589097
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2007 Mar;11(2):119-3017453545
PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes to ageing among older Norwegian adults living in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283443
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-02-2017
Author
Mary H Kalfoss
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Date
May-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent living
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Attitudes toward ageing have powerful influences and impact older adults' own perception of health, quality of life and utilisation of health and social care services. This study describes attitudes to ageing among 490 Norwegian older adults living in the community who responded to The Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire. Results showed that in spite of physical changes and psychological losses, the attitudes of older adults support life acceptance with gained wisdom in feeling that there were many pleasant things about growing older and that their identity was not defined by their age. They demonstrated the ability to incorporate age-related changes within their identities and at the same time maintain a positive view of self. Although they acknowledged that old age represented a time of loss with decreasing physical independence, they meant that their lives had made a difference, they wanted to give a good example to younger persons and felt it was a privilege to grow old.
PubMed ID
28467243 View in PubMed
Less detail

The average cost of pressure ulcer management in a community dwelling spinal cord injury population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123254
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Brian C Chan
Natasha Nanwa
Nicole Mittmann
Dianne Bryant
Peter C Coyte
Pamela E Houghton
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Care Costs
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Readmission - economics
Pilot Projects
Pressure Ulcer - economics - etiology - therapy
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - diagnosis - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common secondary complication experienced by community dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of literature on the health economic impact of PU in SCI population from a societal perspective. The objective of this study was to determine the resource use and costs in 2010 Canadian dollars of a community dwelling SCI individual experiencing a PU from a societal perspective. A non-comparative cost analysis was conducted on a cohort of community dwelling SCI individuals from Ontario, Canada. Medical resource use was recorded over the study period. Unit costs associated with these resources were collected from publicly available sources and published literature. Average monthly cost was calculated based on 7-month follow-up. Costs were stratified by age, PU history, severity level, location of SCI, duration of current PU and PU surface area. Sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Among the 12 study participants, total average monthly cost per community dwelling SCI individual with a PU was $4745. Hospital admission costs represented the greatest percentage of the total cost (62%). Sensitivity analysis showed that the total average monthly costs were most sensitive to variations in hospitalisation costs.
PubMed ID
22715990 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can we move beyond burden and burnout to support the health and wellness of family caregivers to persons with dementia? Evidence from British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132042
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Carole A Robinson
Susan Holtzman
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meredith.lilly@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - therapy
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After more than a decade of concerted effort by policy-makers in Canada and elsewhere to encourage older adults to age at home, there is recognition that the ageing-in-place movement has had unintended negative consequences for family members who care for seniors. This paper outlines findings of a qualitative descriptive study to investigate the health and wellness and support needs of family caregivers to persons with dementia in the Canadian policy environment. Focus groups were conducted in 2010 with 23 caregivers and the health professionals who support them in three communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Thematic analysis guided by the constant comparison technique revealed two overarching themes: (1) forgotten: abandoned to care alone and indefinitely captures the perceived consequences of caregivers' failed efforts to receive recognition and adequate services to support their care-giving and (2) unrealistic expectations for caregiver self-care relates to the burden of expectations for caregivers to look after themselves. Although understanding about the concepts of caregiver burden and burnout is now quite developed, the broader sociopolitical context giving rise to these negative consequences for caregivers to individuals with dementia has not improved. If anything, the Canadian homecare policy environment has placed caregivers in more desperate circumstances. A fundamental re-orientation towards caregivers and caregiver supports is necessary, beginning with viewing caregivers as a critical health human resource in a system that depends on their contributions in order to function. This re-orientation can create a space for providing caregivers with preventive supports, rather than resorting to costly patient care for caregivers who have reached the point of burnout and care recipients who have been institutionalised.
PubMed ID
21851447 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular biomarkers predict fragility fractures in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299736
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Madeleine Johansson
Fabrizio Ricci
Giuseppe Di Martino
Cecilia Rogmark
Richard Sutton
Viktor Hamrefors
Olle Melander
Artur Fedorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenomedullin - blood
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular System - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Correlation of Data
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
To assess the role of four biomarkers of neuroendocrine activation and endothelial dysfunction in the longitudinal prediction of fragility fractures.
We analysed a population-based prospective cohort of 5415 community-dwelling individuals (mean age, 68.9±6.2 years) enrolled in the Malmö Preventive Project followed during 8.1±2.9 years, and investigated the longitudinal association between C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-proAVP), C-terminal endothelin-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1), the mid-regional fragments of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and incident vertebral, pelvic and extremity fractures.
Overall, 1030 (19.0%) individuals suffered vertebral, pelvic or extremity fracture. They were older (70.7±5.8 vs 68.4±6.3 years), more likely women (46.9% vs 26.3%), had lower body mass index and diastolic blood pressure, were more often on antihypertensive treatment (44.1% vs 38.4%) and had more frequently history of fracture (16.3% vs 8.1%). Higher levels of MR-proADM (adjusted HR (aHR) per 1 SD: 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p
Notes
CommentIn: Heart. 2019 Mar;105(6):427-428 PMID 30361269
PubMed ID
30322844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collective action for a common service platform for independent living services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263914
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2013 Oct;82(10):922-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Fatemeh Nikayin
Mark De Reuver
Timo Itälä
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2013 Oct;82(10):922-39
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Finland
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Independent living
Interinstitutional Relations
Leadership
Models, organizational
Organizational Objectives
Abstract
The paper aims to explain how and why organizations, providing assistive devices and related web services for elderly independent living services, might be willing to collaborate and to share their resources and data on a common service platform.
A theoretical framework from literature on collective action theory, platform and business ecosystem concepts was developed to explain what factors influence inter-organizational collective action for a common service platform. The framework was tested in a case study of collaborative platform project for independent living services in Finland. Semi-structured interviews with the project managers and the decision makers of involved organizations were the primary source of data collection.
Strikingly, interdependency among the organizations was not found to be important for collaboration in this case. Instead, we found that a central organization can play an important role in initiating, facilitating and encouraging collaboration among different parties. Moreover, we found more willingness for collaboration when the platform is aimed to be open to third-parties to complement the platform with additional services.
Strategies of the platform leader and openness of the platform towards third parties are the most important drivers for collective action between organizations offering independent living services. Establishing common service platforms for independent living services requires explicit attention to these inter-organizational issues.
PubMed ID
23891564 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community-dwelling older adults with memory loss: needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115614
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Mar;59(3):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Karen Parsons
Aimee Surprenant
Anne-Marie Tracey
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL A1B 3V6. karenp@mun.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Mar;59(3):278-85
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Family Practice
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Memory Disorders - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
To identify the health-related needs of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss.
Qualitative study using semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups.
A large community in Newfoundland.
Twenty-two adults between the ages of 58 and 80 years.
This needs assessment used a qualitative methodology of collecting and analyzing narrative data to develop an understanding of the issues, resources, and constraints of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss. Data were collected through semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using interpretive phenomenologic analysis.
Three constitutive patterns with relational themes and subthemes were identified: forgetting and remembering, normalizing yet questioning, and having limited knowledge of resources. Participants described many examples of how their daily lives were affected by forgetfulness. They had very little knowledge of resources that provided information or support. Most of the participants believed they could not discuss their memory problems with their family doctors.
It is important for older adults with mild memory loss to have access to resources that will assist them in understanding their condition and make them feel supported.
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2006 Sep;52(9):1108-917279222
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2005 Sep;9(5):430-4116024402
Cites: Int Psychogeriatr. 2008 Feb;20(1):77-8517565765
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2008 Jan;18(1):31-4218174533
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Feb;23(2):148-5417578843
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Apr;66(7):1509-2018222581
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;23(8):863-7118537198
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2008 Jul;12(4):444-5018791891
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1776-8318945531
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2009 May;55(5):508-9.e1-719439708
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Nov;48(11):1430-411083319
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Nov;48(11):1435-4111083320
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2001 Feb;49(2):134-4111207866
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2002 Jun;34(1):67-8512122774
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2002 Nov;50(11):1837-4312410903
Cites: ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1986 Apr;8(3):27-373083765
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1992;13:431-491599598
Cites: West J Nurs Res. 2007 Dec;29(8):976-9217984481
PubMed ID
23486801 View in PubMed
Less detail

62 records – page 1 of 7.