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Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
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The association between anemia and falls in community-living women and men aged 65 years and older from the fifth Tromsø Study 2001-02: a replication study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293028
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2017 12 27; 17(1):292
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-27-2017
Author
Laila Arnesdatter Hopstock
Elisabeth Bøe Utne
Alexander Horsch
Tove Skjelbakken
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037, Tromsø, Norway. laila.hopstock@uit.no.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2017 12 27; 17(1):292
Date
12-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Frailty - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Self Report
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Falls are common among elderly people, and the risk increase with age. Falls are associated with both health and social consequences for the patient, and major societal costs. Identification of risk factors should be investigated to prevent falls. Previous studies have shown anemia to be associated with increased risk of falling, but the results are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anemia and self-reported falls among community-living elderly people. The study is a replication of the study by Thaler-Kall and colleagues from 2014, who studied the association between anemia and self-reported falls among 967 women and men 65 years and older in the KORA-Age study from 2009.
We included 2441 participants (54% women) 65 years and older from the population-based Tromsø 5 Study 2001-2002. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between anemia (hemoglobin
Notes
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PubMed ID
29282000 View in PubMed
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The average cost of pressure ulcer management in a community dwelling spinal cord injury population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123254
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Brian C Chan
Natasha Nanwa
Nicole Mittmann
Dianne Bryant
Peter C Coyte
Pamela E Houghton
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Care Costs
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Readmission - economics
Pilot Projects
Pressure Ulcer - economics - etiology - therapy
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - diagnosis - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common secondary complication experienced by community dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of literature on the health economic impact of PU in SCI population from a societal perspective. The objective of this study was to determine the resource use and costs in 2010 Canadian dollars of a community dwelling SCI individual experiencing a PU from a societal perspective. A non-comparative cost analysis was conducted on a cohort of community dwelling SCI individuals from Ontario, Canada. Medical resource use was recorded over the study period. Unit costs associated with these resources were collected from publicly available sources and published literature. Average monthly cost was calculated based on 7-month follow-up. Costs were stratified by age, PU history, severity level, location of SCI, duration of current PU and PU surface area. Sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Among the 12 study participants, total average monthly cost per community dwelling SCI individual with a PU was $4745. Hospital admission costs represented the greatest percentage of the total cost (62%). Sensitivity analysis showed that the total average monthly costs were most sensitive to variations in hospitalisation costs.
PubMed ID
22715990 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular biomarkers predict fragility fractures in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299736
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Madeleine Johansson
Fabrizio Ricci
Giuseppe Di Martino
Cecilia Rogmark
Richard Sutton
Viktor Hamrefors
Olle Melander
Artur Fedorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenomedullin - blood
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular System - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Correlation of Data
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
To assess the role of four biomarkers of neuroendocrine activation and endothelial dysfunction in the longitudinal prediction of fragility fractures.
We analysed a population-based prospective cohort of 5415 community-dwelling individuals (mean age, 68.9±6.2 years) enrolled in the Malmö Preventive Project followed during 8.1±2.9 years, and investigated the longitudinal association between C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-proAVP), C-terminal endothelin-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1), the mid-regional fragments of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and incident vertebral, pelvic and extremity fractures.
Overall, 1030 (19.0%) individuals suffered vertebral, pelvic or extremity fracture. They were older (70.7±5.8 vs 68.4±6.3 years), more likely women (46.9% vs 26.3%), had lower body mass index and diastolic blood pressure, were more often on antihypertensive treatment (44.1% vs 38.4%) and had more frequently history of fracture (16.3% vs 8.1%). Higher levels of MR-proADM (adjusted HR (aHR) per 1 SD: 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p
Notes
CommentIn: Heart. 2019 Mar;105(6):427-428 PMID 30361269
PubMed ID
30322844 View in PubMed
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Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
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Comparison of predictors of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture in community-dwellers with and without Alzheimer's disease - exposure-matched cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283663
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):204
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology
Causality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Dementia, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) being the most common form, is a major hip fracture risk factor, but currently it is not known whether the same factors predict hip fracture among persons with and without dementia/AD. We compared the predictors of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture in persons with and without AD.
An exposure-matched cohort of all community-dwellers of Finland who received a new clinically verified AD diagnosis in 2005-2011 and had no history of previous hip fracture (N = 67,072) and an age, sex, and region-matched cohort of persons without AD (N = 67,072). Associations between sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities and medications and risk of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture were assessed with Cox regression.
As expected, the incidence of hip fractures in 2005-2012 (2.19/100 person-years vs 0.90/100 person-years in the non-AD cohort), as well as mortality after hip fracture (29/100 person-years vs 23/100 person-years in the non-AD cohort) were higher in the AD cohort. This difference was evident regardless of the risk factors. Mental and behavioural disorders (adjusted hazard ratio; HR 95% confidence interval CI: 1.16, 1.09-1.24 and 1.71, 1.52-1.92 in the AD and non-AD-cohorts), antipsychotics (1.12, 1.04-1.20 and 1.56, 1.38-1.76 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) and antidepressants (1.06, 1.00-1.12 and 1.34 1.22-1.47 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) were related to higher, and estrogen/combination hormone therapy (0.87, 0.77-0.9 and 0.79, 0.64-0.98 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) to lower hip fracture risk in both cohorts. Stroke (1.42, 1.26-1.62), diabetes (1.13, 0.99-1.28), active cancer treatment (1.67, 1.22-2.30), proton pump inhibitors (1.14, 1.05-1.25), antiepileptics (1.27, 1.11-1.46) and opioids (1.10, 1.01-1.19) were associated with higher hip fracture risk in the non-AD cohort. Similarly, the associations between mortality risk factors (age, sex, several comorbidities and medications) were stronger in the non-AD cohort.
AD itself appears to be such a significant risk factor for hip fracture, and mortality after hip fracture, that it overrules or diminishes the effect of other risk factors. Thus, it is important to develop and implement preventive interventions that are suitable and effective in this population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27908278 View in PubMed
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Duration of new antidepressant use and factors associated with discontinuation among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300475
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Reetta Kettunen
Heidi Taipale
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Marjaana Koponen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To study how long antidepressants initiated after diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were used and factors associated with discontinuation of use among persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, differences in duration of use between the antidepressants groups were compared.
Register-based Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort included 70,718 community-dwelling people with AD who were diagnosed during the years 2005-2011. For this study, the new antidepressant users were included after 1-year washout period (N?=?16,501; 68.6% females, mean age 80.9). The duration of antidepressant use was modeled with the PRE2DUP method. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were assessed with Cox proportional hazard models and included age, gender, comorbid conditions and concomitant medications.
Median duration of the new antidepressant use period was 309 days (IQR 93-830). For selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use, the median duration was 331 days (IQR 101-829), for mirtazapine 202 days (IQR 52-635), and for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) 134 days (IQR 37-522). After 1-year follow-up, 40.8% had discontinued antidepressant use, 54.6% after 2 years and 64.1% after 3 years. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were age over 85, male gender, diabetes, and use of memantine, opioids, and antiepileptics whereas benzodiazepines and related drugs and antipsychotic use were inversely associated with discontinuation.
Antidepressants are used for long-term among people with AD. Need and indication for antidepressant use should be assessed regularly as evidence on their efficacy for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia is limited.
PubMed ID
30413841 View in PubMed
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Effect of Chronic Diseases and Multimorbidity on Survival and Functioning in Elderly Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286615
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 May;65(5):1056-1060
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Debora Rizzuto
René J F Melis
Sara Angleman
Chengxuan Qiu
Alessandra Marengoni
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 May;65(5):1056-1060
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the effect of chronic disorders and their co-occurrence on survival and functioning in community-dwelling older adults.
Population-based cohort study.
Kungsholmen, Stockholm, Sweden.
Individuals aged 78 and older examined by physicians four times over 11 years (N = 1,099).
Chronic diseases (grouped according to 10 organ systems according to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, code) and multimorbidity (=2 coexisting chronic diseases) were evaluated in terms of mortality, population attributable risk of death, median years of life lost, and median survival time with and without disability (need of assistance in =1 activities of daily living).
Approximately one in four deaths were attributable to cardiovascular and one in six to neuropsychiatric diseases. Malignancy was the condition with the shortest survival time (2.5 years). Malignancies and cardiovascular disorders each accounted for approximately 5 years of life lost. In contrast, neurosensorial and neuropsychiatric conditions had the longest median survival time (>6 years), and affected people were disabled for more than half of this time. The most-prevalent and -burdensome condition was multimorbidity, affecting 70.4% of the population, accounting for 69.3% of total deaths, and causing 7.5 years of life lost. Finally, people with multimorbidity lived 81% of their remaining years of life with disability (median 5.2 years).
Survival in older adults differs in length and quality depending on specific conditions. The greatest negative effect at the individual (shorter life, greater dependence) and societal (number of attributable deaths, years spent with disability) level was from multimorbidity, which has made multimorbidity a clinical and public health priority.
PubMed ID
28306158 View in PubMed
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Formal and Informal Care of Community-Living Older People: A Population-Based Study from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285244
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017;21(1):17-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
A. Wimo
S. Elmståhl
L. Fratiglioni
B-M Sjölund
A. Sköldunger
C. Fagerström
J. Berglund
M. Lagergren
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017;21(1):17-24
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - therapy
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Independent living
Male
Patient Care
Sweden
Abstract
Study formal and informal care of community-living older people in the Swedish National study of Aging and Care (SNAC).
Cross-sectional, population based cohort.
Three areas in Sweden: Municipality of Nordanstig, Stockholm and Skåne County.
3,338 persons =72 years.
Patterns and amounts of informal and formal care by cognition and area of residence.
73% received no care; 14% formal care; and 17% informal care (7% received both). In the whole study population, including those who used no care, individuals in small municipalities received 9.6 hours of informal care/month; in mid-size municipalities, 6.6; and in urban areas, 5.6. Users of informal care received 33.1 hours of informal care/month in small municipalities, 54.6 in mid-size municipalities and 36.1 in urban areas. Individuals with cognitive impairment received 14.1 hours of informal care/month, 2.7 times more than people with no/slight impairment. In the whole study population, individuals in small municipalities received an average of 3.2 hours of formal care/month; in mid-size municipalities 1.4; and in urban areas, 2.6. Corresponding figures for formal care users were 29.4 hours in small municipalities, 13.6 in mid-size municipalities and 16.7 in urban areas. Formal care users received 7.1 hours, and informal care users, 5.9 hours for each hour/month received by people in the study population as a whole.
More informal than formal care was provided. Informal care is more frequent in small municipalities than urban areas and for those with than without cognitive impairment. The relationship between data on the whole population and the data on users or care indicates that population-based data are needed to avoid overestimates of care.
PubMed ID
27999845 View in PubMed
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