Skip header and navigation

Refine By

17 records – page 1 of 2.

The average cost of pressure ulcer management in a community dwelling spinal cord injury population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123254
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Brian C Chan
Natasha Nanwa
Nicole Mittmann
Dianne Bryant
Peter C Coyte
Pamela E Houghton
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Care Costs
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Readmission - economics
Pilot Projects
Pressure Ulcer - economics - etiology - therapy
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - diagnosis - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common secondary complication experienced by community dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of literature on the health economic impact of PU in SCI population from a societal perspective. The objective of this study was to determine the resource use and costs in 2010 Canadian dollars of a community dwelling SCI individual experiencing a PU from a societal perspective. A non-comparative cost analysis was conducted on a cohort of community dwelling SCI individuals from Ontario, Canada. Medical resource use was recorded over the study period. Unit costs associated with these resources were collected from publicly available sources and published literature. Average monthly cost was calculated based on 7-month follow-up. Costs were stratified by age, PU history, severity level, location of SCI, duration of current PU and PU surface area. Sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Among the 12 study participants, total average monthly cost per community dwelling SCI individual with a PU was $4745. Hospital admission costs represented the greatest percentage of the total cost (62%). Sensitivity analysis showed that the total average monthly costs were most sensitive to variations in hospitalisation costs.
PubMed ID
22715990 View in PubMed
Less detail

Choosing a measure of support need: implications for research and policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148267
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):949-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
H K Brown
H. Ouellette-Kuntz
I. Bielska
D. Elliott
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Community Health & Epidemiology, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):949-54
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Independent living
Intellectual Disability - rehabilitation
Male
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
The paradigm surrounding the delivery of care for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) is shifting from a deficit-based approach to a support-based approach. However, it is unclear whether measures of support act as a proxy for adaptive functioning.
A sample of 40 staff or family members of individuals with ID completed the Supports Intensity Scale and the Scales of Independent Behavior-Revised, Short Form. Correlations were used to examine the relationship between these scales.
The subscales of the Supports Intensity Scale as well as the overall support needs index were highly correlated with both the Broad Independence W score and the support score (which reflects both maladaptive and adaptive behaviours) of the Scales of Independent Behavior-Revised.
The strong correlations between these two scales confirm previous findings that current measures of support and measures of adaptive behaviour tap into the same underlying construct. These findings have implications for the development, use and interpretation of research and planning tools.
PubMed ID
19793387 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dependency and transfer incomes in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263808
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Charlotte Starhof
Niels Anker
Tove Henriksen
Christina Funch Lassen
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population above 65 years of age. The aim of this study was to define the estimated Danish IPD population and to elucidate source of income and labour market affiliation for working-age IPD patients.
IPD cases were included through the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The participants had to be alive by the end of 2010 and at least twice have cashed in prescriptions on IPD medication in the 2009-2010 period. Information on employment status and transfer income was retrieved through the DREAM database under the Danish Ministry of Employment.
A total of 7,033 estimated IPD patients were identified. The mean age at time of registration (2010, week 50) was 72 years. Overall, 7% of the IPD patients were employed and 5% were self-supportive. In the working age range (18-64 years), 25% were employed and 10% enrolled in supported employment. Compared with the age-adjusted general population, twice as many IPD patients were outside the ordinary labour market and, furthermore, the proportion receiving anticipatory pension was increased threefold. The majority (89%) of the patients were living at home with a spouse (59%). 11% were nursing home residents.
The working age IPD population was more prone to be outside employment and to receive public transfer income than an age-adjusted population sample.
The study was funded by the Danish Parkinson Association.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25283617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do personal assistance activities promote participation for persons with disabilities in Sweden?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294940
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 12; 39(24):2512-2521
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2017
Author
Heléne von Granitz
Ieva Reine
Karin Sonnander
Ulrika Winblad
Author Affiliation
a Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 12; 39(24):2512-2521
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Independent Living - standards
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Public Policy
Social Participation
Social Security - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine how the right to participation according to Article 19 of the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) is promoted by personal assistance use in Sweden across age, gender and eligible person categories.
Register data and data from a questionnaire were used (N?=?15,289). Principal component analysis was performed and the internal consistency was tested. Descriptive statistics (?2 test) were used across age, gender and eligible person categories and components.
An uneven distribution of personal assistance across the components Health and Care; Home, Leisure and Social Interaction; and Daily Occupation was found. Significant differences in personal assistance reported were found between children and adults, men and women and between the three eligible person categories.
The discrepancy between reported and expected outcome of personal assistance indicates that Article 19 of the UNCRPD has not been met. The unequal access to participation across age, gender and eligible person categories would seem to further signify that the Act concerning Support and Service for Persons with Certain Functional Impairments is promoting activities of a caring nature rather than fulfilling Article 19 of the UNCRPD, i.e. ensuring full participation in society. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Government assistance allowance were granted for predominantly health and care, i.e. basic needs presenting risk of undermining the intention of participation in society. Men reported more personal assistance use for activities promoting participation than women. The discrepancy found between reported and expected outcome of personal assistance underlines the importance of service providers and administrative officials being sensitive to policy intentions. There is a need of guidelines for service providers and administrative officials to promote disability rights of participation for persons eligible for personal assistance.
PubMed ID
27796138 View in PubMed
Less detail

Heterogeneity of Characteristics among Housing Adaptation Clients in Sweden--Relationship to Participation and Self-Rated Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275389
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Björg Thordardottir
Carlos Chiatti
Lisa Ekstam
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the paper was to explore the heterogeneity among housing adaptation clients. Cluster analysis was performed using baseline data from applicants in three Swedish municipalities. The analysis identified six main groups: "adults at risk of disability", "young old with disabilities", "well-functioning older adults", "frail older adults", "frail older with moderate cognitive impairments" and "resilient oldest old". The clusters differed significantly in terms of participation frequency and satisfaction in and outside the home as well as in terms of self-rated health. The identification of clusters in a heterogeneous sample served the purpose of finding groups with different characteristics, including participation and self-rated health which could be used to facilitate targeted home-based interventions. The findings indicate that housing adaptions should take person/environment/activity specific characteristics into consideration so that they may fully serve the purpose of facilitating independent living, as well as enhancing participation and health.
Notes
Cites: Med Care. 1980 Feb;18(2 Suppl):iii, 1-537188781
Cites: Gerontologist. 2005 Jun;45(3):327-3615933273
Cites: Am J Occup Ther. 2005 May-Jun;59(3):296-30415969277
Cites: Gerontologist. 2007 Feb;47(1):96-10717327545
Cites: Scand J Occup Ther. 2007;14(1):44-5317366077
Cites: Gerontologist. 2007 Apr;47(2):150-817440120
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2007 Sep;16(7):1147-5617530446
Cites: Age Ageing. 2008 Jan;37(1):45-5018032400
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2008 Apr;40(4):253-6018382820
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2009 Feb;41(3):150-619229447
Cites: Med Care. 2009 Mar;47(3):286-9419165121
Cites: Scand J Occup Ther. 2009 May;16(2):78-8718821447
Cites: Gerontologist. 2009 Jun;49(3):355-6719420315
Cites: Can J Occup Ther. 2009 Jul;76 Spec No:235-4519757729
Cites: Age Ageing. 2010 May;39(3):319-2620208073
Cites: Rev Bras Fisioter. 2011 Sep-Oct;15(5):406-1322031334
Cites: J Nutr Gerontol Geriatr. 2011;30(4):315-6822098178
Cites: Am J Occup Ther. 2012 May-Jun;66(3):284-9122549593
Cites: Gerontology. 2012;58(4):313-2122286330
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(20):1706-1522380652
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;(9):CD00714622972103
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Jan;61(1):96-10023311555
Cites: Aust Occup Ther J. 2013 Apr;60(2):101-923551003
Cites: Med Anthropol Q. 2013 Sep;27(3):414-3324123293
Cites: Maturitas. 2014 May;78(1):62-624685290
Cites: Sao Paulo Med J. 2014;132(4):224-3025055068
Cites: Scand J Occup Ther. 2014 Sep;21(5):323-3324784725
Cites: Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:28176025165694
Cites: Gerontologist. 2014 Oct;54(5):762-7223749390
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Nov;62(11):2118-2425370593
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2014 Nov-Dec;59(3):648-5625109810
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Feb;63(2):371-425644085
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Jan 17;385(9964):231-825255696
Cites: PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e012007725734828
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:60225432718
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2015 Apr;96(4):578-8825813890
Cites: Int Psychogeriatr. 2015 Jul;27(7):1071-8725633917
Cites: BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:9526231354
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Nov 28;386(10009):2145-9126321261
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(4):193-2021785028
Cites: Med Care. 1994 Jul;32(7):668-858028403
Cites: Health Policy. 1996 Jul;37(1):53-7210158943
Cites: Aging (Milano). 1995 Oct;7(5):371-88719604
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Apr;53(4):695-915817019
Cites: Occup Ther Int. 2005;12(1):44-5915962699
PubMed ID
26729145 View in PubMed
Less detail

Home bittersweet home: the significance of home for occupational transformations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146118
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2011 May;57(3):284-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Maria Lindström
Margareta Lindberg
Stefan Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Division of Occupational Therapy, Umeå University, Sweden. maria.lindstrom@occupther.umu.se
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2011 May;57(3):284-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Borderline Personality Disorder - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Group Homes
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Occupational therapy
Patient Discharge
Public Assistance
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Schizophrenia - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Environment
Social Work, Psychiatric
Sweden
Abstract
The study illuminated how persons with psychiatric disabilities experienced the processes of change in a residential context.
Qualitative interviews with residents living in supported housing were conducted and analyzed using constant comparative analysis.
Residential conditions appear to provide a complex structure that facilitates rehabilitative interactions, in which 'progressive tensions' arise between opposing values, such as authentic versus artificial, and independence versus dependence, both of which are important in the process of change.
A client-centred approach could be taken further if clients are engaged in productive discussions about challenging these 'progressive tensions'. Awareness of the meaning of home also emerged as central.
PubMed ID
20068023 View in PubMed
Less detail

Home Help Service Staffs' Descriptions of Their Role in Promoting Everyday Activities Among Older People in Sweden Who Are Dependent on Formal Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299773
Source
J Appl Gerontol. 2017 08; 36(8):971-992
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Sara Cederbom
Charlotta Thunborg
Eva Denison
Anne Söderlund
Petra von Heideken Wågert
Author Affiliation
1 School of Healt, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
J Appl Gerontol. 2017 08; 36(8):971-992
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The study aimed to explore how home help service staff described their role in improving the abilities of older people, in particular, older women with chronic pain who are dependent on formal care, to perform everyday activities. Three focus group interviews were conducted, and a qualitative inductive thematic content analysis was used. The analysis resulted in one theme: struggling to improve the care recipients' opportunities for independence but being inhibited by complex environmental factors. By encouraging the care recipients to perform everyday activities, the staff perceived themselves to both maintain and improve their care recipients' independence and quality of life. An important goal for society and health care professionals is to improve older people's abilities to "age in place" and to enable them to age independently while maintaining their quality of life. A key resource is home help service staff, and this resource should be utilized in the best possible way.
PubMed ID
26209706 View in PubMed
Less detail

Landlords' experiences of housing tenants suffering from severe mental illness: a Swedish empirical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256602
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2014 Jan;50(1):111-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
A. Bengtsson-Tops
L. Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Kristianstad University, 291 88, Kristianstad, Sweden, anita.bengtsson_tops@hkr.se.
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2014 Jan;50(1):111-9
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Community Mental Health Services
Cooperative Behavior
Crisis Intervention
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Housing
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Ownership
Private Sector
Psychotic Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Public Housing
Qualitative Research
Social Desirability
Social Responsibility
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this Swedish study was to describe landlords' experiences of having tenants suffering from severe mental illness. Sixteen landlords working in private and public housing agencies participated in open in-depth interviews. Data were subjected to a thematic latent content analysis. The results showed that having tenants with severe mental illness entails being confronted with various difficult circumstances, ranging from mismanagement of apartments to sensitivity among neighbours as well as issues regarding provocative behaviour. It involved providing assistance that was far beyond their professional obligations and to be neglected by the community-based psychiatric service system when in need of help. In order to support landlords and to prevent evictions of individuals with severe mental illness, community-based psychiatric services need to be more pro-active in their attempts to achieve collaboration with the parties at hand.
PubMed ID
23361470 View in PubMed
Less detail

Leisure-time physical activity and diet quality are not associated in people with chronic spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141511
Source
Spinal Cord. 2011 Mar;49(3):381-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
K H Knight
A C Buchholz
K A Martin Ginis
R E Goy
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2011 Mar;49(3):381-5
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Guideline Adherence - trends
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Spinal Cord Injuries - diet therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cross-sectional.
To determine the association between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and adherence to Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide (CFG) in community-dwelling adults with chronic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).
Ontario, Canada.
Participants were recruited as part of the Study of Health and Activity in People with SCI (SHAPE-SCI). Dietary data were collected using 24-h recalls and analysed for adherence to CFG recommendations by age group and gender. LTPA was assessed using the Physical Activity Recall Assessment for Persons with SCI. Statistical analysis comprised correlations, multiple regression and ?(2).
We studied 75 adults (n=61 M; 42.4±11.8 years; 25.5±5.2?kg?m(-2)) with chronic (=1-year post-injury) SCI. Of these, 37% of participants were inactive, 29% were low-active and 33% were high-active. Fewer than 5% of participants were 100% adherent with CFG; 85% were adherent to =50%. Activity level and overall adherence to CFG were not correlated (r=-0.052, P=0.666). Although there were no associations between LTPA and vegetables and fruit, grain products, milk and alternatives, or other foods (all P>0.05), high activity was associated with consuming less than the minimum number of recommended servings of meat and alternatives (f=-0.258, P=0.026).
Clinicians need to be aware of the poor diet quality, and low levels of physical activity, of people with chronic SCI. They should not assume that those who are more active consume better quality diets than those who are low active or inactive.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
PubMed ID
20714337 View in PubMed
Less detail

Life habits performance of individuals with brain injury in different living environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116565
Source
Brain Inj. 2013;27(2):135-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Marie-Eve Lamontagne
Frederique Poncet
Emmanuelle Careau
Marie-Josée Sirois
Normand Boucher
Author Affiliation
Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration (CIRRIS), Québec, Canada. lamontagne_marie@hotmail.com
Source
Brain Inj. 2013;27(2):135-44
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Adjustment
Social Participation
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Little is known about variations in social participation among individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) living in different environments.
To examine the social participation of individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI across various living arrangements.
One hundred and thirty-six individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI, living either in natural settings (e.g. home), intermediate settings (e.g. group homes or foster families) or structured settings (e.g. nursing home or long-term care facilities) and requiring daily assistance, were interviewed using the LIFE-H tool, which measures the level of difficulty and the assistance required to carry out life habits and resulting social participation. Participation in six categories of life habits pertaining to Activities of Daily Living and five categories pertaining to Social Roles were examined.
The level of difficulty and the assistance required to carry out the life habits and the overall level of social participation were associated with living arrangements. Participation scores in Activities of Daily Living varied across living arrangements while Social Roles scores did not.
Living arrangements (such as intermediate settings) may better support social participation in individuals with TBI. There is a need to further study the issue of living arrangements as they seem to facilitate the performance of life habits, which impacts the social participation of individuals with TBI.
PubMed ID
23384212 View in PubMed
Less detail

17 records – page 1 of 2.