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Attitudes to ageing among older Norwegian adults living in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283443
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-02-2017
Author
Mary H Kalfoss
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2017 May 02;22(5):238-245
Date
May-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Independent living
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Attitudes toward ageing have powerful influences and impact older adults' own perception of health, quality of life and utilisation of health and social care services. This study describes attitudes to ageing among 490 Norwegian older adults living in the community who responded to The Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire. Results showed that in spite of physical changes and psychological losses, the attitudes of older adults support life acceptance with gained wisdom in feeling that there were many pleasant things about growing older and that their identity was not defined by their age. They demonstrated the ability to incorporate age-related changes within their identities and at the same time maintain a positive view of self. Although they acknowledged that old age represented a time of loss with decreasing physical independence, they meant that their lives had made a difference, they wanted to give a good example to younger persons and felt it was a privilege to grow old.
PubMed ID
28467243 View in PubMed
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Choosing a measure of support need: implications for research and policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148267
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):949-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
H K Brown
H. Ouellette-Kuntz
I. Bielska
D. Elliott
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Community Health & Epidemiology, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):949-54
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Independent living
Intellectual Disability - rehabilitation
Male
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
The paradigm surrounding the delivery of care for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) is shifting from a deficit-based approach to a support-based approach. However, it is unclear whether measures of support act as a proxy for adaptive functioning.
A sample of 40 staff or family members of individuals with ID completed the Supports Intensity Scale and the Scales of Independent Behavior-Revised, Short Form. Correlations were used to examine the relationship between these scales.
The subscales of the Supports Intensity Scale as well as the overall support needs index were highly correlated with both the Broad Independence W score and the support score (which reflects both maladaptive and adaptive behaviours) of the Scales of Independent Behavior-Revised.
The strong correlations between these two scales confirm previous findings that current measures of support and measures of adaptive behaviour tap into the same underlying construct. These findings have implications for the development, use and interpretation of research and planning tools.
PubMed ID
19793387 View in PubMed
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Dietary resilience as described by older community-dwelling adults from the NuAge study "if there is a will -there is a way!".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128482
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Elisabeth Vesnaver
Heather H Keller
Hélène Payette
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
University of Guelph, Department of Family Relations and Applied Human Nutrition, Macdonald Institute, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):730-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Diet
Eating - physiology
Female
Food - economics
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Many older adults experience age-related changes that can have negative consequences for food intake. Some older adults continue to eat well despite these challenges showing dietary resilience. We aimed to describe the strategies used by older adults to overcome dietary obstacles and to explore the key themes of dietary resilience. The sample was drawn from the five-year Québec Longitudinal Study "NuAge". It included 30 participants (80% female) aged 73-87 years; 10 with decreased diet quality and 20 with steady or increased diet quality; all had faced key barriers to eating well. Semi-structured interviews explored how age-related changes affected participants' experiences with eating. Thematic analysis revealed strategies used to overcome eating, shopping, and meal preparation difficulties. Key themes of dietary resilience were: prioritizing eating well, doing whatever it takes to keep eating well, being able to do it yourself, getting help when you need it. Implications for health professionals are discussed.
PubMed ID
22200412 View in PubMed
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Distribution and evaluation of sense of coherence among older immigrants before and after a health promotion intervention - results from the RCT study promoting aging migrants' capability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297835
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2018; 13:2317-2328
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
2018
Author
L A Arola
E Barenfeld
S Dahlin-Ivanoff
G Häggblom-Kronlöf
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Section for Health and Rehabilitation, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, annikki.arola@arcada.fi.
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2018; 13:2317-2328
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Balkan Peninsula - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Finland - ethnology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Independent living
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Sense of Coherence
Sweden
Abstract
The migration process can be a threat to a person's sense of coherence (SOC) and to their ability to experience life as comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful. Seen from a salutogenic perspective, this may have a negative impact on the experience of health.
We describe the distribution of SOC and its components among older persons with an immigrant background now aging in Sweden. In addition, we evaluated whether a group-based health promotion program with a person-centered approach could support the SOC among older persons in this group.
A randomized controlled trial with postintervention follow-ups at 6 and 12 months was conducted with 131 independently living persons aged =70 years from Finland and the Balkan Peninsula. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention group (4 weeks of group intervention and one follow-up home visit) and a control group (no intervention but access to ordinary health care services). The outcome measure was the SOC measured by SOC-13. Chi-square and ORs were calculated.
There was a significant improvement in total SOC scores for the intervention group at 6-month follow-up. Also, the ORs for the SOC components were higher in the person-centered intervention group. However, we found no significant between-group differences nor did the effect last until the 12-month follow-up.
Persons who have lived a long time in a host country after migration seem to have a SOC similar to native-born persons. Interventions with a person-centered approach could support the SOC by capturing individual life situations. Such interventions could support older persons by making everyday life more comprehensible and manageable and helping them to cope with challenges in daily life caused by aging.
PubMed ID
30532522 View in PubMed
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Family members' strategies when their elderly relatives consider relocation to a residential home--adapting, representing and avoiding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121097
Source
J Aging Stud. 2012 Dec;26(4):495-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Maria Söderberg
Agneta Ståhl
Ulla Melin Emilsson
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Lund University, Sweden. Maria.Soderberg@soch.lu.se
Source
J Aging Stud. 2012 Dec;26(4):495-503
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude
Caregivers - psychology
Communication
Decision Making
Denial (Psychology)
Disability Evaluation
Female
Guilt
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interview, Psychological
Judgment
Male
Nursing Homes
Parent-Child Relations
Patient Selection
Personal Autonomy
Professional-Family Relations
Social Responsibility
Social Values
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this article is to reveal how family members act, react and reason when their elderly relative considers relocation to a residential home. Since family members are usually involved in the logistics of their elderly relative's relocation, yet simultaneously expected not to influence the decision, the focus is on how family members experience participation in the relocation process in a Swedish context. 17 family members are included in 27 open, semi-structured interviews and follow-up contacts. Prominent features in the findings are firstly the family members' ambition to tone down their personal opinions, even though in their minds their personal preferences are clear, and secondly, the family members' ambivalence about continuity and change in their everyday lives. Family members are found to apply the adapting, the representing, or the avoiding strategy, indirectly also influencing their interaction with the care manager. Siblings applied the adapting strategy, spouses the representing strategy, while family members in the younger generation at times switched between the strategies.
PubMed ID
22939546 View in PubMed
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Heterogeneity of Characteristics among Housing Adaptation Clients in Sweden--Relationship to Participation and Self-Rated Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275389
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Björg Thordardottir
Carlos Chiatti
Lisa Ekstam
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the paper was to explore the heterogeneity among housing adaptation clients. Cluster analysis was performed using baseline data from applicants in three Swedish municipalities. The analysis identified six main groups: "adults at risk of disability", "young old with disabilities", "well-functioning older adults", "frail older adults", "frail older with moderate cognitive impairments" and "resilient oldest old". The clusters differed significantly in terms of participation frequency and satisfaction in and outside the home as well as in terms of self-rated health. The identification of clusters in a heterogeneous sample served the purpose of finding groups with different characteristics, including participation and self-rated health which could be used to facilitate targeted home-based interventions. The findings indicate that housing adaptions should take person/environment/activity specific characteristics into consideration so that they may fully serve the purpose of facilitating independent living, as well as enhancing participation and health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26729145 View in PubMed
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Living alone with dementia: an interpretive phenomenological study with older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142787
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1698-707
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Lorna de Witt
Jenny Ploeg
Margaret Black
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. ladewitt@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1698-707
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Dementia - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Marital status
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Qualitative Research
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study of the meaning of living alone from the perspective of older people with dementia.
Risks and problems experienced by older women living alone have been investigated mostly through quantitative research. Balancing their safety and autonomy is a serious international community care dilemma. Older people's perspectives have been muted in qualitative research on living alone with dementia.
Using an interpretive phenomenological approach and van Manen's method, 14 interviews were conducted in Ontario, Canada from January 2004 to April 2005 with eight older women diagnosed with Alzheimer disease or a related dementia.
The theme holding back time expressed the temporal meaning of living alone. Pharmacological treatments represented stored time, offering the opportunity to hold back future dreaded time. Past experience with others with dementia was a context for holding on to now and facing some risks of living alone with memory loss. The women acknowledged the limited time remaining for, and identified endpoints to, living alone.
Insight into the impact of past experience with others with dementia could inform nursing assessment and advocacy for health/social services that are sensitive to the potential emotional impact of mixing people with varied levels of dementia in the same programme.
Notes
Comment In: J Adv Nurs. 2010 Sep;66(9):213820740711
PubMed ID
20557395 View in PubMed
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Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer living at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281720
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Jan;24(1):57-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Hanne Peoples
Åse Brandt
Eva E Wæhrens
Karen la Cour
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Jan;24(1):57-64
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Occupational therapy
Occupations
Qualitative Research
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
People with advanced cancer are able to live for extended periods of time. Advanced cancer can cause functional limitations influencing the ability to manage occupations. Although studies have shown that people with advanced cancer experience occupational difficulties, there is only limited research that specifically explores how these occupational difficulties are managed.
To describe and explore how people with advanced cancer manage occupations when living at home.
A sub-sample of 73 participants from a larger occupational therapy project took part in the study. The participants were consecutively recruited from a Danish university hospital. Qualitative interviews were performed at the homes of the participants. Content analysis was applied to the data.
Managing occupations were manifested in two main categories; (1) Conditions influencing occupations in everyday life and (2) Self-developed strategies to manage occupations.
The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer should be supported to a greater extent in finding ways to manage familiar as well as new and more personally meaningful occupations to enhance quality of life.
PubMed ID
27578556 View in PubMed
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Older men's lay definitions of successful aging over time: the Manitoba follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108708
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2013;76(4):297-322
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Robert B Tate
Audrey U Swift
Dennis J Bayomi
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Robert.Tate@med.umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2013;76(4):297-322
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Gender Identity
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Population Dynamics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Retirement
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
The concept of "successful aging" has become widely accepted in gerontology, yet continues to have no common underlying definition. Researchers have increasingly looked to older individuals for their lay definitions of successful aging. The present analysis is based on responses to five questionnaires administered to surviving participants of the male Manitoba Follow-up Study cohort (www.mfus.ca) in 1996, 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006 (n = 2,043 men were alive at a mean age of 78 years in 1996). One question on each survey asked: "What is YOUR definition of successful aging?" Applying content analysis to the 5,898 narratives received over the 11 years, we developed a coding system encompassing 21 main themes and 86 sub-themes defining successful aging. We quantitatively analyzed trends in prevalence of themes of successful aging prospectively over time. Our findings empirically support colleagues' past suggestions to shift from defining successful aging in primarily biomedical terms, by taking lay views into account.
PubMed ID
23855184 View in PubMed
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Residential normalcy and environmental experiences of very old people: changes in residential reasoning over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104667
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Marianne Granbom
Ines Himmelsbach
Maria Haak
Charlotte Löfqvist
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: marianne.granbom@med.lu.se.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:9-19
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Attitude to Health
Environment Design
Female
Germany
Homeless Persons - psychology
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Memory, Long-Term
Object Attachment
Patient Safety
Privacy - psychology
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Social Distance
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
The decision to relocate in old age is intricately linked to thoughts and desires to stay put. However, most research focuses either on strategies that allow people to age in place or on their reasons for relocation. There is a need for more knowledge on very old peoples' residential reasoning, including thoughts about aging in place and thoughts about relocation as one intertwined process evolving in everyday life. The aim of this study was to explore what we refer to as the process of residential reasoning and how it changes over time among very old people, and to contribute to the theoretical development regarding aging in place and relocation. Taking a longitudinal perspective, data stem from the ENABLE-AGE In-depth Study, with interviews conducted in 2003 followed up in interviews in 2011. The 16 participants of the present study were 80-89years at the time of the first interview. During analysis the Theoretical Model of Residential Normalcy by Golant and the Life Course Model of Environmental Experience by Rowles & Watkins were used as sensitizing concepts. The findings revealed changes in the process of residential reasoning that related to a wide variety of issues. Such issues included the way very old people use their environmental experience, their striving to build upon or dismiss attachment to place, and their attempts to maintain or regain residential normalcy during years of declining health and loss of independence. In addition, the changes in reasoning were related to end-of-life issues. The findings contribute to the theoretical discussion on aging in place, relocation as a coping strategy, and reattachment after moving in very old age.
PubMed ID
24655669 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.