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Long-term use of benzodiazepines and related drugs among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270647
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jul;30(4):202-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cognition - drug effects
Comorbidity
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Prevalence
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use, especially long-term use, and associated factors among community-dwelling individuals with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). We utilized data from the MEDALZ-2005 cohort, which includes all community-dwelling individuals diagnosed with AD in Finland at the end of 2005 and matched comparison individuals without AD. Register-based data included prescription drug purchases, comorbidities, and hospital discharge diagnoses. In this study, 24,966 individuals with AD and 24,985 individuals without AD were included. During the 4-year follow-up, we found that 45% (N = 11,312) of individuals with AD and 38% (N = 9534) of individuals without AD used BZDRs. The prevalence of long-term (= 180 days) BZDR use was more common among individuals with AD (30%) than individuals without AD (26%). The median durations of the first long-term use periods of BZDRs were 1.5 and 2 years for individuals with and without AD, respectively. Factors associated with long-term BZDR use included female sex, AD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, coronary artery disease, and asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The high prevalence of long-term BZDR use among individuals with AD is especially a cause for concern because long-term use may further impair cognition and may be associated with serious adverse events.
PubMed ID
26011780 View in PubMed
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Use of antidepressants among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease: a nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268450
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2015 Apr;27(4):669-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Marja-Liisa Laitinen
Eija Lönnroos
J Simon Bell
Piia Lavikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2015 Apr;27(4):669-72
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - drug therapy - psychology
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Depression - drug therapy - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Sex Factors
Abstract
Antidepressants are used to treat depression and behavioral symptoms in Alzheimer's disease (AD), although their effectiveness has been questioned and evidence about the risks is accumulating. The objective of this study was to compare antidepressant use among persons with and without AD in Finland.
The Social Insurance Institution of Finland (SII) identified all persons with a verified diagnosis of AD in Finland on December 31, 2005. For each person with AD a comparison person matched for age, sex and region of residence was also identified. Data on reimbursed drug purchases in 2005 were extracted from the Finnish National Prescription Register (FNPR). Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for antidepressant use.
The study sample comprised of 28,089 matched pairs of persons with and without AD (mean age 80.0 SD 6.8, 32.2% men).The prevalence of antidepressant use was higher among persons with AD than without AD (29.4% vs. 10.7%, OR = 3.54; 95% CI: 3.38, 3.70). Among the persons with AD, the prevalence of antidepressant use increased with time since AD diagnosis but not with age. Overall, 90.4% of antidepressant users with AD were co-dispensed anti-dementia drugs.
The antidepressant use was three times more prevalent among persons with AD compared to those without. Though the antidepressant selection was largely consistent with clinical practice guidelines, the high prevalence of use warrants further investigation given the uncertain effectiveness and adverse events related to these drugs.
PubMed ID
25412711 View in PubMed
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