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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics and mortality risk in relation to obstructive and central sleep apnoea in community-dwelling elderly individuals: a 7-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125918
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Peter Johansson
Urban Alehagen
Eva Svanborg
Ulf Dahlström
Anders Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linkoping University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sleep
Sleep Apnea, Central - mortality - physiopathology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - mortality - physiopathology
Stroke Volume
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Time Factors
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
little is known about demographic and clinical characteristics associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) or central sleep apnoea (CSA) in community-dwelling elderly. We also examined these (OSA and CSA) associations to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality.
a total of 331 community-dwelling elderly aged 71-87 years underwent a clinical examination and one-night polygraphic recordings in their homes. Mortality data were collected after seven years.
a total of 55% had SDB, 38% had OSA and 17% had CSA. Compared with those with no SDB and OSA, more participants with CSA had a left ventricular ejection fraction 75 years does not appear to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease or mortality, whereas CSA might be a pathological marker of CVD and impaired systolic function associated with higher mortality.
PubMed ID
22440587 View in PubMed
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Combined resistance and balance-jumping exercise reduces older women's injurious falls and fractures: 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273603
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Saija Karinkanta
Pekka Kannus
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Muscle strength
Odds Ratio
Postural Balance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Resistance Training
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
previously, a randomised controlled exercise intervention study (RCT) showed that combined resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB) improved physical functioning and bone strength. The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess whether this exercise intervention had long-lasting effects in reducing injurious falls and fractures.
five-year health-care register-based follow-up study after a 1-year, four-arm RCT.
community-dwelling older women in Finland.
one hundred and forty-five of the original 149 RCT participants; women aged 70-78 years at the beginning.
participants' health-care visits were collected from computerised patient register. An injurious fall was defined as an event in which the subject contacted the health-care professionals or was taken to a hospital, due to a fall. The rate of injured fallers was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, HR), and the rate of injurious falls and fractures by Poisson regression (risk ratio, RR).
eighty-one injurious falls including 26 fractures occurred during the follow-up. The rate of injured fallers was 62% lower in COMB group compared with the controls (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85). In addition, COMB group had 51% less injurious falls (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.98) and 74% less fractures (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.97).
home-dwelling older women who participated in a 12-month intensive multi-component exercise training showed a reduced incidence for injurious falls during 5-year post-intervention period. Reduction in fractures was also evident. These long-term effects need to be confirmed in future studies.
PubMed ID
25990940 View in PubMed
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Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years--a prospective long-term follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264015
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Petra Pohl
Ellinor Nordin
Anders Lundquist
Ulrica Bergström
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Fall-related injuries in older people are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Self-reported fall events in the last year is often used to estimate fall risk in older people. However, it remains to be investigated if the fall frequency and the consequences of the falls have an impact on the risk for subsequent injurious falls in the long term. The objective of this study was to investigate if a history of one single non-injurious fall, at least two non-injurious falls, or at least one injurious fall within 12 months increases the risk of sustaining future injurious falls.
Community-dwelling individuals 75-93 years of age (n = 230) were initially followed prospectively with monthly calendars reporting falls over a period of 12 months. The participants were classified into four groups based on the number and type of falls (0, 1, =2 non-injurious falls, and =1 injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to a hospital emergency department). The participants were then followed for several years (mean time 5.0 years ±1.1) regarding injurious falls requiring a visit to the emergency department. The Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of injurious falls.
During the long-term follow-up period, thirty per cent of the participants suffered from at least one injurious fall. Those with a self-reported history of at least one injurious fall during the initial 12 months follow-up period showed a significantly higher risk for sustaining subsequent injurious falls in the long term (hazard ratio 2.78; 95% CI, 1.40-5.50) compared to those with no falls. No other group showed an increased risk.
In community-dwelling people over 75 years of age, a history of at least one self-reported injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to the emergency department within a period of 12 months implies an increased risk of sustaining future injurious falls. Our results support the recommendations to offer a multifactorial fall-risk assessment coupled with adequate interventions to community-dwelling people over 75 years who present to the ED due to an injurious fall.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25407714 View in PubMed
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The effect of comprehensive geriatric assessment on anticholinergic exposure assessed by four ranked anticholinergic lists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283602
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2017 Jan - Feb;68:195-201
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pasi Lampela
Heidi Taipale
Piia Lavikainen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2017 Jan - Feb;68:195-201
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
Older people often use multiple drugs, and some of them have anticholinergic activity. Anticholinergic drugs may cause adverse reactions, and therefore their use should be limited. To identify anticholinergic load, several ranked lists with different drugs and scoring systems have been developed and used widely in research. We investigated, if a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) decreased the anticholinergic drug score in a 4-year period. We used four different anticholinergic ranked lists to determine the anticholinergic score and to describe how the results differ depending on the list used.
We analyzed data from population-based intervention study, in which a random sample of 1000 persons aged =75 years were randomized to either an intervention group or a control group. Those in the intervention group underwent CGA including medication assessment annually between 2004 and 2007. Current medication use was assessed annually. The anticholinergic load was calculated by using four ranked lists of anticholinergic drugs (Boustani's, Carnahan's, Chew's and Rudolph's) for each person and for each year.
CGA had no statistically significant effect on anticholinergic exposure during the 4-year follow-up, but improvements towards more appropriate medication use were observed especially in the intervention group. However, age, gender and functional comorbidity index were associated to higher anticholinergic exposure, depending on the list used.
Repeated CGAs may result as more appropriate anticholinergic medication use. The selection of the list may affect the results and therefore the selection of the list is important.
PubMed ID
27837709 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of the Finnish Alzheimer disease exercise trial (FINALEX): a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114708
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2013
Author
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Minna M Pöysti
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Niina Savikko
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of Primary Health Care, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@helsinki.fi
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):894-901
Date
May-27-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - economics - therapy
Caregivers
Day Care - economics - organization & administration
Exercise Therapy - economics - methods - organization & administration
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
House Calls - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Physical Therapists
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Few rigorous clinical trials have investigated the effectiveness of exercise on the physical functioning of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD).
To investigate the effects of intense and long-term exercise on the physical functioning and mobility of home-dwelling patients with AD and to explore its effects on the use and costs of health and social services.
A randomized controlled trial.
A total of 210 home-dwelling patients with AD living with their spousal caregiver.
The 3 trial arms included (1) group-based exercise (GE; 4-hour sessions with approximately 1-hour training) and (2) tailored home-based exercise (HE; 1-hour training), both twice a week for 1 year, and (3) a control group (CG) receiving the usual community care.
The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Short Physical Performance Battery, and information on the use and costs of social and health care services.
All groups deteriorated in functioning during the year after randomization, but deterioration was significantly faster in the CG than in the HE or GE group at 6 (P = .003) and 12 (P = .015) months. The FIM changes at 12 months were -7.1 (95% CI, -3.7 to -10.5), -10.3 (95% CI, -6.7 to -13.9), and -14.4 (95% CI, -10.9 to -18.0) in the HE group, GE group, and CG, respectively. The HE and GE groups had significantly fewer falls than the CG during the follow-up year. The total costs of health and social services for the HE patient-caregiver dyads (in US dollars per dyad per year) were $25,112 (95% CI, $17,642 to $32,581) (P = .13 for comparison with the CG), $22,066 in the GE group ($15,931 to $28,199; P = .03 vs CG), and $34,121 ($24,559 to $43,681) in the CG.
An intensive and long-term exercise program had beneficial effects on the physical functioning of patients with AD without increasing the total costs of health and social services or causing any significant adverse effects.
anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2013 Aug 20;159(4):JC1024026274
Comment In: MMW Fortschr Med. 2013 Nov 7;155(19):3224475662
Comment In: JAMA Intern Med. 2013 May 27;173(10):901-223588877
PubMed ID
23589097 View in PubMed
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Modifiable midlife risk factors, independent aging, and survival in older men: report on long-term follow-up of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265380
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 May;63(5):877-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Kristin Franzon
Björn Zethelius
Tommy Cederholm
Lena Kilander
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 May;63(5):877-85
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Independent living
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine relationships between modifiable midlife factors, aging, and physical and cognitive function (independent aging) and survival in very old age.
Prospective cohort.
Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, Uppsala, Sweden.
Swedish men investigated in 1970-74 (aged 48.6-51.1) and followed up for four decades (N=2,293).
Conventional cardiovascular risk factors, body mass index (BMI), and dietary biomarkers were measured, and a questionnaire was used to gather information on lifestyle variables at age 50. Four hundred seventy-two men were reinvestigated in 2008-09 (aged 84.8-88.9). Independent aging was defined as survival to age 85, Mini-Mental State Examination score of 25 or greater, not living in an institution, independent in personal care and hygiene, able to walk outdoors without personal help, and no diagnosis of dementia. The National Swedish Death Registry provided survival data.
Thirty-eight percent of the cohort survived to age 85. Seventy-four percent of the participants in 2008-09 were aging independently. In univariable analyses, high leisure-time physical activity predicted survival but not independent aging. Low work-time physical activity was associated more strongly with independent aging (odds ratio (OR)=1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.18-2.88) than with survival (OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.05-1.52). In multivariable analyses, midlife BMI was negatively associated (OR=0.80/SD, 95% CI=0.65-0.99/SD), and never or former smoking was positively associated (OR=1.66, 95% CI=1.07-2.59), with independent aging. As expected, conventional cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors were associated with mortality.
A normal midlife BMI and not smoking were associated with independent aging close to four decades later, indicating that normal weight at midlife has the potential not only to increase survival, but also to preserve independence with aging.
PubMed ID
25919442 View in PubMed
Less detail

Older women's personal goals and exercise activity: an 8-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103083
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Milla Saajanaho
Anne Viljanen
Sanna Read
Merja Rantakokko
Li-Tang Tsai
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Dept. of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):386-92
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Goals
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent living
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Report
Abstract
This study investigated the associations of personal goals with exercise activity, as well as the relationships between exercise-related and other personal goals, among older women. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used with a sample of 308 women ages 66-79 at baseline. Women who reported exercise-related personal goals were 4 times as likely to report high exercise activity at baseline than those who did not report exercise-related goals. Longitudinal results were parallel. Goals related to cultural activities, as well as to busying oneself around the home, coincided with exercise-related goals, whereas goals related to own and other people's health and independent living lowered the odds of having exercise-related goals. Helping older adults to set realistic exercise-related goals that are compatible with their other life goals may yield an increase in their exercise activity, but this should be evaluated in a controlled trial.
PubMed ID
23945665 View in PubMed
Less detail

Physical activity correlates with arterial stiffness in community-dwelling individuals with stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257030
Source
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2014 Feb;23(2):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ada Tang
Janice J Eng
Penelope M Brasher
Kenneth M Madden
Azam Mohammadi
Andrei V Krassioukov
Teresa S M Tsang
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre, Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2014 Feb;23(2):259-66
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Multivariate Analysis
Oxygen consumption
Prognosis
Pulse Wave Analysis
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Stroke - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Vascular Stiffness
Abstract
Physical inactivity contributes to atherosclerotic processes, which manifest as increased arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is associated with myocardial demand and coronary perfusion and is a risk factor for stroke and other adverse cardiac outcomes. Poststroke mobility limitations often lead to physical inactivity and sedentary behaviors. This exploratory study aimed to identify functional correlates, reflective of daily physical activity levels, with arterial stiffness in community-dwelling individuals >1 year poststroke.
Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was measured in 35 participants (65% men; mean ± SD age 66.9 ± 6.9 years; median time poststroke 3.7 years). Multivariable regression analyses examined the relationships between cfPWV and factors associated with daily physical activity: aerobic capacity (VO2 peak), gait speed, and balance ability (Berg Balance Scale). Age and the use of antihypertensive medications, known to be associated with pulse wave velocity, were also included in the model.
Mean cfPWV was 11.2 ± 2.4 m/s. VO2 peak and age were correlated with cfPWV (r = -0.45 [P = .006] and r = 0.46 [P = .004], respectively). In the multivariable regression analyses, age and the use of antihypertensive medication accounted for 20.4% of the variance of cfPWV, and the addition of VO2 peak explained an additional 4.5% of the variance (R2 = 0.249).
We found that arterial stiffness is elevated in community-dwelling, ambulatory individuals with stroke relative to healthy people. Multivariable regression analysis suggests that aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) may contribute to the variance of cfPWV after accounting for the effects of age and medication use. Whether intense risk modification and augmented physical activity will improve arterial stiffness in this population remains to be determined.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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