Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Active living among older Canadians: a time-use perspective over 3 decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116266
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jamie E L Spinney
Hugh Millward
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Geography, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Demography
Energy Metabolism
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Exertion
Prevalence
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This research uses four nationally representative samples of time diary data, spanning almost 30 yr, that are fused with energy expenditure information to enumerate the median daily duration of moderate or vigorous effort activity, quantify the prevalence of Canadians age 65 yr and older who are meeting recommended daily levels of physical activity, and explore the factors affecting rates of active living. Results indicate that 41.1% of older Canadians met recommended levels of physical activity in 1992, 40.6% in 1998, 43.5% in 2005, and 39.6% in 2010. Both rates of active living and daily duration of aerobic activity exhibit significant differences among sociodemographic groups, with age, sex, activity limitation, urban-rural, and season exhibiting the most significant influences. This study illustrates the potential for time diary data to provide detailed surveillance of physical activity patterns, active aging research, and program development, as well.
PubMed ID
23416414 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of seizures on morbidity and mortality after stroke: a Canadian multi-centre cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149085
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2010 Jan;17(1):52-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
J G Burneo
J. Fang
G. Saposnik
Author Affiliation
Epilepsy Programme, Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. jburneo2@uwo.ca
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2010 Jan;17(1):52-8
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay
Male
Mortality
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Quality of Life
Seizures - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Abstract
Limited information is available about the impact of seizures on stroke outcome, health care delivery and resource utilization.
To determine whether the presence of seizures after stroke increases disability, mortality and health care utilization (length of hospital stay, ICU admission, consults, discharge to a long-term care facility).
This cohort study included consecutive patients with acute stroke between July 2003 and June 2005 from the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network (RCSN), the largest clinical database of patients in Canada with acute stroke seen at selected acute care hospitals. We compared clinical characteristics and outcomes amongst patients experiencing stroke without and with seizures occurring during inpatient stay. Main outcome measures included: case-fatality, disability at discharge, length-of-stay, and discharge disposition. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine whether the presence of seizures was associated with poor stroke outcomes.
Amongst 5027 patients included in the study; seizures occurred in 138 (2.7%) patients with stroke. Patients with seizures had a higher mortality at 30-day (36.2% vs. 16.8%, P
PubMed ID
19686350 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of social vulnerability on the survival of the fittest older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127519
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):161-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Melissa K Andrew
Arnold Mitnitski
Susan A Kirkland
Kenneth Rockwood
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. mandrew@dal.ca
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):161-5
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Physical Fitness
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
even older adults who are fit experience adverse health outcomes; understanding their risks for adverse outcomes may offer insight into ambient population health. Here, we evaluated mortality risk in relation to social vulnerability among the fittest older adults in a representative community-dwelling sample of older Canadians.
in this secondary analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, participants (n = 5,703) were aged 70+ years at baseline. A frailty index was used to grade relative levels of fitness/frailty, using 31 self-reported health deficits. The analysis was limited to the fittest people (those reporting 0-1 health deficit). Social vulnerability was trichotomised from a social vulnerability scale, which consisted of 40 self-reported social deficits.
five hundred and eighty-four individuals had 0-1 health deficit. Among them, absolute mortality risk rose with increasing social vulnerability. In those with the lowest level of social vulnerability, 5-year mortality was 10.8%, compared with 32.5% for those with the highest social vulnerability (adjusted hazard ratio 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5-4.3, P = 0.001).
a 22% absolute mortality difference in the fittest older adults is of considerable clinical and public health importance. Routine assessment of social vulnerability by clinicians could have value in predicting the risk of adverse health outcomes in older adults.
PubMed ID
22287038 View in PubMed
Less detail