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Aging in rural Canada: a retrospective and review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132883
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Norah Keating
Jennifer Swindle
Stephanie Fletcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta. Norah.keating@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Family
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities
Research
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Social Participation
Social Support
Work
Abstract
Research on rural aging has developed considerably since publication of the book Aging in Rural Canada (Butterworths, 1991). The purpose of this article is twofold: to provide a retrospective on issues in rural aging from this book, and to review Canadian literature on rural aging since its publication. The review highlights new directions in conceptual definitions of rural, and in issues of social engagement, independence, family and social networks, and rural services and health. Two main research lenses are evident. The marginalization lens focuses on rural seniors with health problems, but has not included those marginalized by poverty or gender. The aging-well lens focuses on contributions and engagement, but has omitted research on social relationships and quality of family interaction. The report includes a call for interrogation about interaction between people and place, and for understanding issues of rural diversity and processes of rural aging.
PubMed ID
21767464 View in PubMed
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How much are we willing to pay to prevent a fall? Cost-effectiveness of a multifactorial falls prevention program for community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124120
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Jun;31(2):121-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Krista Bray Jenkyn
Jeffrey S Hoch
Mark Speechley
Author Affiliation
Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph's Health Care, Parkwood Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada. krista.brayjenkyn@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Jun;31(2):121-37
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - economics - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Policy - economics
Humans
Independent Living - economics
Male
Public Health - economics
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
This study examined the cost-effectiveness of a multifactorial falls prevention program and estimated the trade-off between the extra costs of such a program and the additional reduction of unintentional falls. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated using the traditional incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and the net benefit regression framework (NBRF). Using the NBRF, decision making was formalized by incorporating values of willingness to pay (WTP) a priori. The results failed to provide evidence that a multifactorial falls prevention program was cost-effective. Participant adherence to recommendations ranged from low (41.3%), to moderate (21.1%), to high (37.6%). A future challenge is to understand more clearly the relationship between the community-dwelling older adult, potentially modifiable risks for falls, adherence to multifactorial risk factor recommendations, costs, and resulting effects of falls prevention practices. Future economic evaluations of falls prevention interventions remain necessary and should consider the NBRF so that regression tools can facilitate cost-effectiveness analysis.
PubMed ID
22621837 View in PubMed
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[Management of immobilization in the elderly. A program of mobility and walking adapted for the elderly in the Cité-de-la-Santé of Laval].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127435
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 Jan-Feb;9(1):37
Publication Type
Article

Peer-centered practice: a theoretical framework for intervention with young people in and from care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117695
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):75-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kim Snow
Varda Mann-Feder
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):75-93
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Foster Home Care
Group Homes
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Mentors
Peer Group
Social Welfare
Transition to Adult Care
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper puts forward a conceptual framework for engaging peers as central to transitional services for care-leavers. The situation of youth exiting care is examined and an evidence-informed approach to supporting care-leavers is presented. Exploring the social networks of youth leaving care provides a mechanism for both supporting the maintenance of ties and fostering the development of weak tie connections that facilitate opportunities for social mobility.
PubMed ID
24851476 View in PubMed
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Provinces call for improved senior care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106826
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Nov 5;185(16):E752
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-5-2013

Reliability and validity of the French-Canadian Late Life Function and Disability Instrument in community-living wheelchair-users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112880
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 Sep;20(5):365-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Brodie M Sakakibara
François Routhier
Marie-Pier Lavoie
William C Miller
Author Affiliation
Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 Sep;20(5):365-73
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Independent living
Language
Lower Extremity - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Participation
Upper Extremity - physiology
Wheelchairs
Abstract
To examine the test-retest reliability, standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, construct validity, and ceiling and floor effects in the French-Canadian Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI-F).
The LLFDI-F is a measure of activity (i.e. physical functioning of upper and lower extremities), and participation (i.e. frequency of and limitations with). The measure was administered over the telephone to a sample of community-living wheelchair-users, who were 50 years of age and older, in this 10-day retest methodological study. The sample (n = 40) was mostly male (70%), had a mean age of 62.2 years, and mean experience with using a wheelchair of 20.2 years. Sixty-five percent used a manual wheelchair.
The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) for the participation component ranged from 0.68 to 0.90 and from 0.74 to 0.97 for the activity component. Minimal detectable changes ranged from 7.18 to 22.56 in the participation component and from 4.71 to 16.19 in the activity component. Mann-Whitney U-tests revealed significant differences between manual and power wheelchair-users in the personal and instrumental role domains, and all areas in the activity component.
There is support for the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the LLFDI-F in community-living wheelchair-users, 50 years of age and older. However, because the majority of items in the lower-extremity domains of the activity component do not account for assistive device use, they are not recommended for use with individuals who have little or no use of their lower-extremities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23786550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sustained economic benefits of resistance training in community-dwelling senior women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133301
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Jul;59(7):1232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jennifer C Davis
Carlo A Marra
M Clare Robertson
Mehdi Najafzadeh
Teresa Liu-Ambrose
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. jcdavis@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Jul;59(7):1232-7
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cognition Disorders - economics - prevention & control
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Independent living
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Resistance Training - economics
Abstract
To determine whether the health and cost benefits of resistance training were sustained 12 months after formal cessation of the intervention.
Cost-utility analysis conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial.
Community-dwelling women aged 65 to 75 living in Vancouver, British Columbia.
One hundred twenty-three of the 155 community-dwelling women aged 65 to 75 years who originally were randomly allocated to once-weekly resistance training (n=54), twice-weekly resistance training (n=52), or twice-weekly balance and tone exercises (control group; n=49) participated in the 12-month follow-up study. Of these, 98 took part in the economic evaluation (twice-weekly balance and tone exercises, n=28; once-weekly resistance training, n=35; twice-weekly resistance training, n=35).
The primary outcome measure was incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Healthcare resource utilization was assessed over 21 months (2009 prices); health status was assessed using the EuroQol-5D to calculate QALYs using a 21-month time horizon.
Once- and twice-weekly resistance training were less costly than balance and tone classes, with incremental mean healthcare costs of Canadian dollars (CAD$)1,857 and CAD$1,077, respectively. The incremental QALYs for once- and twice-weekly resistance training were -0.051 and -0.081, respectively, compared with balance and tone exercises.
The cost benefits of participating in a 12-month resistance training intervention were sustained for the once- and twice-weekly resistance training group, whereas the health benefits were not.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21718265 View in PubMed
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Theorizing accommodation in supportive home care for older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117676
Source
J Aging Stud. 2013 Jan;27(1):30-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Christine Ceci
Mary Ellen Purkis
Kristin Björnsdóttir
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405 87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. christine.ceci@ualberta.ca
Source
J Aging Stud. 2013 Jan;27(1):30-7
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Frail Elderly
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Iceland
Independent living
Models, Theoretical
Needs Assessment
Abstract
This paper examines the issue of what thinking is necessary in order to advance a notion of accommodation in the organization and provision of supportive home care for older people. Accommodation in this context is understood as responsiveness to the singularity of older adults, and we consider how this idea might be used to support opportunities for (independent) living for elders as they age and become frailer. To elaborate the question we draw on examples from our empirical work - ethnographic studies of home care practice undertaken in Canada and Iceland - and consider these examples in light of critical philosophical and social theory, particularly Agamben's (1993) work, The Coming Community. This is a relevant frame through which to consider the potential for the accommodation of the unique needs of older adults in home care because it helps us to problematize the systems through which care is accomplished and the current, dominant terms of relations between individuals and collectives. We argue that giving substance to a notion of accommodation contributes an important dimension to aligned ideas, such as patient-centeredness in care, by working to shift the intentionality of these practices. That is, accommodation, as an orientation to care practices, contests the organizational impulse to carry on in the usual way.
PubMed ID
23273554 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.