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Independent living and romantic relations among young adults born preterm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261212
Source
Pediatrics. 2015 Feb;135(2):290-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Tuija Männistö
Marja Vääräsmäki
Marika Sipola-Leppänen
Marjaana Tikanmäki
Hanna-Maria Matinolli
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Katri Räikkönen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Petteri Hovi
Eero Kajantie
Source
Pediatrics. 2015 Feb;135(2):290-7
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beauty
Body Image
Body mass index
Coitus - psychology
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Love
Male
Self Concept
Sexual Partners - psychology
Social Adjustment
Young Adult
Abstract
Young adults born preterm at very low birth weight start families later. Whether less severe immaturity affects adult social outcomes is poorly known.
The study "Preterm birth and early life programming of adult health and disease" (ESTER, 2009-2011) identified adults born early preterm (
PubMed ID
25624386 View in PubMed
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Number of teeth and selected cardiovascular risk factors among elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148959
Source
Gerodontology. 2010 Sep;27(3):189-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Anna-Maija Hannele Syrjälä
Pekka Ylöstalo
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Matti Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. Anna-Maija.Syrjala@oulu.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2010 Sep;27(3):189-92
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Dentition
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology
Leukocyte Count
Marital status
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Xerostomia - epidemiology
Abstract
To produce evidence on an association between the number of teeth and selected cardiovascular risk factors among an elderly population.
The study population comprised of 523 community-living elderly people who participated in the population-based Kuopio 75+ study. The data for each subject were collected using a structured clinical health examination, an interview and laboratory tests. Linear regression models were used to estimate adjusted mean values and confidence limits.
Edentulous persons and persons with a small number of teeth had lower serum HDL cholesterol and higher triglyceride, leucocyte and blood glucose levels and a higher body mass index (BMI) compared with subjects to a large number of teeth.
The study showed that, in the Finnish home-dwelling population aged 75 years or older, those with a large number of teeth were less likely to have cardiovascular risk factors such as a low serum HDL cholesterol level, a high triglyceride level and a high BMI than did subjects with a small number of teeth or who were edentulous.
PubMed ID
19702670 View in PubMed
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Obese very old women have low relative hangrip strength, poor physical function, and difficulties in daily living.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266901
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2015 Jan;19(1):20-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
H-J Dong
J. Marcusson
E. Wressle
M. Unosson
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2015 Jan;19(1):20-5
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Obesity - physiopathology
Overweight - physiopathology
Skinfold thickness
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To investigate whether anthropometric and body composition variables and handgrip strength (HS) were associated with physical function and independent daily living in 88-year-old Swedish women.
A cross-sectional analysis of 83 community-dwelling women aged 88 years who were of normal weight (n=30), overweight (n=29), and obese (n=24) was performed.
Body weight (Wt), height, waist circumference (WC), and arm circumference were assessed using an electronic scale and a measuring tape. Tricep skinfold thickness was measured using a skinfold calliper. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis, and HS was recorded with an electronic grip force instrument. Linear regression was used to determine the contributions of parameters as a single predictor or as a ratio of HS to physical function (Short Form-36, SF-36PF) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL).
Obese women had greater absolute FM and FFM and lower HS corrected for FFM and HS-based ratios (i.e., HS/Wt, HS/body mass index [BMI]) than their normal weight and overweight counterparts. After adjusting for physical activity levels and the number of chronic diseases, HS-based ratios explained more variance in SF-36PF scoring (R2, 0.52-0.54) than single anthropometric and body composition variables (R2, 0.45-0.51). WC, HS, and HS-based ratios (HS/Wt and HS/FFM) were also associated with independence in IADL.
Obese very old women have a high WC but their HS is relatively low in relation to their Wt and FFM. These parameters are better than BMI for predicting physical function and independent daily living.
PubMed ID
25560812 View in PubMed
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Objective measurements of daily physical activity patterns and sedentary behaviour in older adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119275
Source
Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):222-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Annemarie Koster
Dane R Van Domelen
Robert J Brychta
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna Eyrun Sverrisdottir
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Erlingur Johannsson
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Author Affiliation
Research Center of Movement Science, University of Iceland, Stapi v/Hringbraut, Reykjavík 101, Iceland. nya@hi.is
Source
Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):222-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - genetics
Body mass index
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Iceland
Independent living
Longevity
Male
Motor Activity
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Swimming
Time Factors
Abstract
objectively measured population physical activity (PA) data from older persons is lacking. The aim of this study was to describe free-living PA patterns and sedentary behaviours in Icelandic older men and women using accelerometer.
from April 2009 to June 2010, 579 AGESII-study participants aged 73-98 years wore an accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X) at the right hip for one complete week in the free-living settings.
in all subjects, sedentary time was the largest component of the total wear time, 75%, followed by low-light PA, 21%. Moderate-vigorous PA (MVPA) was
Notes
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PubMed ID
23117467 View in PubMed
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