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Nutritional treatment of aged individuals with Alzheimer disease living at home with their spouses: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124098
Source
Trials. 2012;13:66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Satu K Jyvakorpi
Taija Puranen
Kaisu H Pitkala
Merja H Suominen
Author Affiliation
Society for Memory Disorders Expertise in Finland, Fredriksberginkatu 2, 00240 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Trials. 2012;13:66
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Body Weight
Caregivers - psychology
Cognition
Counseling
Depression - etiology
Dietary Supplements
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Hand Strength
Humans
Independent living
Malnutrition - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control - psychology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Therapy
Nutritional Status
Quality of Life
Research Design
Spouses - psychology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Nutritional status often deteriorates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Less is known about whether nutritional care reverses malnutrition and its harmful consequences in AD. The aim of this study is to examine whether individualized nutritional care has an effect on weight, nutrition, health, physical functioning, and quality of life in older individuals with AD and their spouses living at home.
AD patients and their spouses (aged > 65?years) living at home (n?=?202, 102?AD patients) were recruited using central AD registers in Finland. The couples were randomized into intervention and control groups. A trained nutritionist visited intervention couples 4-8 times at their homes and the couples received tailored nutritional care. When necessary, the couples were given protein and nutrient-enriched complementary drinks. All intervention couples were advised to take vitamin D 20?µg/day. The intervention lasted for one year. The couples of the control group received a written guide on nutrition of older people. Participants in the intervention group were assessed every three months. The primary outcome measure is weight change. Secondary measures are the intake of energy, protein, and other nutrients, nutritional status, cognition, caregiver's burden, depression, health related quality of life and grip strength.
This study provides data on whether tailored nutritional care is beneficial to home-dwelling AD patients and their spouses.
ACTRN 12611000018910.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22624652 View in PubMed
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Obese very old women have low relative hangrip strength, poor physical function, and difficulties in daily living.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266901
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2015 Jan;19(1):20-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
H-J Dong
J. Marcusson
E. Wressle
M. Unosson
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2015 Jan;19(1):20-5
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Obesity - physiopathology
Overweight - physiopathology
Skinfold thickness
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To investigate whether anthropometric and body composition variables and handgrip strength (HS) were associated with physical function and independent daily living in 88-year-old Swedish women.
A cross-sectional analysis of 83 community-dwelling women aged 88 years who were of normal weight (n=30), overweight (n=29), and obese (n=24) was performed.
Body weight (Wt), height, waist circumference (WC), and arm circumference were assessed using an electronic scale and a measuring tape. Tricep skinfold thickness was measured using a skinfold calliper. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis, and HS was recorded with an electronic grip force instrument. Linear regression was used to determine the contributions of parameters as a single predictor or as a ratio of HS to physical function (Short Form-36, SF-36PF) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL).
Obese women had greater absolute FM and FFM and lower HS corrected for FFM and HS-based ratios (i.e., HS/Wt, HS/body mass index [BMI]) than their normal weight and overweight counterparts. After adjusting for physical activity levels and the number of chronic diseases, HS-based ratios explained more variance in SF-36PF scoring (R2, 0.52-0.54) than single anthropometric and body composition variables (R2, 0.45-0.51). WC, HS, and HS-based ratios (HS/Wt and HS/FFM) were also associated with independence in IADL.
Obese very old women have a high WC but their HS is relatively low in relation to their Wt and FFM. These parameters are better than BMI for predicting physical function and independent daily living.
PubMed ID
25560812 View in PubMed
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